Updated 8:30 p.m. ET

The bill to fund the government through Dec. 11 has been signed into law by President Obama. That beats the midnight deadline for keeping government agencies operating.

Earlier in the day, the Senate and the House passed the bill, which does not strip funding from Planned Parenthood.

Remember, some House Republicans had insisted on no payments to Planned Parenthood before they would vote to extend funding for the whole government.

NPR's Ailsa Chang reported on the bill's progress for our Newscast unit:

Correctional facilities have to provide health services to people who are incarcerated, but that doesn't mean the care is free of charge. In most states, inmates may be on the hook for copayments ranging from a few dollars to as much as $100 for medical care, a recent study finds.

Twitter seems simple — just type in 140 characters and hit enter, right? But Twitter can be tough. Building an audience. Keeping that audience. Finding a voice. Cutting through all the chatter. It's a lot, especially if you're a busy elected official.

Well, elected officials, fear not! Twitter itself is here to help. NPR recently discovered that the social media giant has a very special handbook just for people running for elected office. And it's 136 pages long.

A Washington state lawmaker who has been trying to make paid family leave available to all workers said a new federal grant will be a big help. 

A massive multi-family apartment building with commercial retail spaces underneath. A train enters the photo in the foreground at the left of the frame.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds talks to King County Executive Dow Constantine about his new initiative to develop 700 units of affordable housing around transit centers. 

John Boehner, pictured here in 2012, announced his resignation from Congress on Sept. 25, 2015.
Flickr Photo/Speaker John Boehner (CC BY NC 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds talks with reporter Jeff Mapes of The Oregonian  about how John Boehner's resignation as Speaker of the House could affect Republican lawmakers in the Northwest.

Starting October 1, adults in Oregon will be able to walk into a medical marijuana dispensary and buy pot for recreational use. But not in dozens of communities across the state, where local officials have banned such sales.

Oregon lawmakers are returning to Salem Monday to take a look at issues they think can't wait until their next legislative session.

Citing a lack of confidence, Washington’s Utilities and Transportation Commission has taken emergency action to suspend Ride the Ducks tours in Seattle.

Oregon voters could see competing minimum-wage initiatives on their 2016 ballot. A group that favors a hike to $13.50 per hour kicked off their signature gathering campaign Monday.

Shell Oil's Polar Pioneer left the Port of Seattle for Alaska on the morning of June 15, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Brian Gregory

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about how Shell Oil's decision to stop off-shore arctic oil drilling might affect Western Washington. Also, they talk about how Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit to the Seattle area could affect the economy long-term.

Employees at Ike's Pot Shop in Seattle's Central District sell marijuana products on their opening day, Sept. 30, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

Ross Reynolds interviews Hal Snow, the head of cannabis practice at the law firm Garvey Schubert Barer. It’s legal to buy and sell marijuana in some states, but the legal picture is far from clear. Cannabis is still illegal under federal law, although tolerated by the attorney general as long as states follow certain rules. But that makes most bankers leery about providing financial services to marijuana businesses. Will a new president and Congress in January 2017 change the picture? 

An injured person is taken from the scene of the Aurora Bridge bus crash on Thursday.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Is the Aurora Bridge too narrow for six fast-moving lanes? Tim Eyman is in trouble again, and unrepentantly so. What did China’s president bring to Seattle besides traffic? Will Seattle’s tallest landmark be eclipsed by a long shot? And what if the Seahawks never win again?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with Knute Berger, Joni Balter and Bill Finkbeiner, plus KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph, Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins, Puget Sound Business Journal’s Emily Parkhurst  and Mike Pesca of Slate’s The Gist podcast.

Howard Lake, north of Stehekin in Washington's North Cascades.
Courtesy of Mike Annee

Fifty Washington lawmakers have made an impassioned plea to change the name of a North Cascades lake on federal maps to remove the possibility that it represents a racial slur.

(This post was last updated at 1:31 p.m. ET.)

House Speaker John Boehner will give up his seat in Congress at the end of October.

Boehner became the 53rd speaker of the House in 2011. The Ohio Republican's tenure has been marked by fierce confrontations with Democrats and sometimes with his own party. One of those fights led to a 16-day partial government shutdown in 2013.

Amid renewed conflict with more conservative members of his party, Boehner is once again facing the prospect of a government shutdown.