Government

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Although the tunnel boring machine known as “Bertha” is at a standstill, work is still underway to replace Seattle’s Alaskan Way Viaduct.

Flickr Photo/Ian Pattison (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with David Ward, an attorney at Legal Voice,  and Mary Ellen Stone, executive director of King County Sexual Assault Resource Center, about a movement to shift sexual consent from "no means no" to "yes means yes." 

Ross Reynolds talks with democratic political consultant Christian Sinderman about King County Councilmember Reagan Dunn's confession of a recent DUI and his drinking problem. 

Ross Reynolds talks with Elizabeth Smith, assistant director of fraud prevention and labor standards at the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries, about how the state is working to address worker misclassification and other types of wage fraud.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Ross Reynolds talks with Jenny Durkan, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington, who announced that she will step down at the end of the month. She looks back at her role in Seattle Police Department reform, preventing cyber crime and shaping state marijuana laws.

The latest reading on unemployment in Washington state shows the rate holding steady in August at 5.6 percent. That's half a percentage point below the national rate according to a report from Washington's employment department Wednesday.

September is voter registration month, but inspiring Americans to register and vote isn't always easy. Especially with politicians held in such low esteem. So some groups — and a few election officials — are taking a page from the book of Mad Men's Don Draper to get voters to the polls. Who knew that voting could be this much fun?

Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Kevin Desmond, general manager of King County Metro, about the new county budget that found a way to save some of the projected cuts to the bus service.

Catholic and other religious hospitals and universities have been arguing in federal court for much of the past two years that they shouldn't have to offer or facilitate birth control as part of their employee health plans because it violates their religious beliefs.

But what happens when the insurance company is itself Catholic? It turns out that Catholic health plans have for years been arranging for outside firms to provide contraceptive coverage to their enrollees.

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

One of the public health clinics slated for closure got a reprieve today as King County Executive Dow Constantine announced a partnership that would keep the White Center Public Health Clenter at Greenbridge open through the 2016 fiscal year.

construction crane
Flickr Photo/sea turtle (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A construction boom and runaway hiring at Amazon are leading to stronger than expected tax revenues for the city of Seattle.

City budget officials say they expect to collect about $7 million more in taxes for 2015 and 2016.

Flickr Photo/Miss USA Redneck (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton about Washington state's proposal to trim university budgets by as much as 15 percent.

Mine Pays For Environmental Projects As Part Of Fine

Sep 15, 2014

High tech weather sensors are now installed throughout the area scorched by the Carlton Complex wildfire. The hope is that they will warn residents of potential flash floods. The funding for the technology is coming from an unusual source.

In August, flash flooding swept through north central Washington. The area had earlier been burned by the Carlton Complex fire. The flooding took residents by surprise.

Now, new rain gauges that communicate via satellite will warn of future flash flooding in the area.

Millions of Americans are still grappling with debt they've accumulated since the recession hit. And new numbers out Monday show many are having a tougher time than you might think.

One in 10 working Americans between the ages of 35 and 44 are getting their wages garnished. That means their pay is being docked — often over an old credit card debt, medical bill or student loan.

That striking figure comes out of a collaboration between NPR and ProPublica. The reporting offers the first available national numbers on wage garnishment.

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