Elections | KUOW News and Information

Elections

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

One of Mayor Mike McGinn’s campaign promises when he ran in 2009 was to extend high-speed Internet in Seattle. Now the city is partnering with  Gigabit Squared to extend high-speed service that, while initially limited to a few neighborhoods, could compete favorably with Comcast.

How We Averted A Shutdown At RadioActive, AKA Our Coverage Of Election 2013

Nov 1, 2013
Courtesy of Real Change News/Wes Sauer

In this month’s RadioActive podcast, hosts Isaac Noren and Nina Tran narrowly avert a beverage-related shutdown of podcast production. Plus, RadioActive youth reporters bring you coverage of the local election:

  • Kendra Hanna finds that people on the street in the University District support Initiative 522 to label genetically modified food.
  • Halle Bills goes to one of the coolest candidate forums ever: Washington Bus' Candidate Survivor. Hear Seattle’s mayoral candidates make up haiku. They’re not so bad!
  • Last but not least, Yafiet Bezabih fills you in on Seattle’s mayoral election, including an exclusive interview with one of the candidates, State Sen. Ed Murray.

Find more KUOW coverage at our Elections 2013 page.

Thank you to Real Change for sharing the photo of Ed Murray and Yafiet Bezabih. Check out their coverage of the Seattle mayoral race here.

RadioActive is KUOW's youth radio program, and all the stories here are produced by young people age 16-21. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

It’s Friday — time to talk over the week's news with The Stranger's Eli Sanders, Joni Balter of the Seattle Times and Crosscut's Knute Berger.

Questions over who knew what and when about the latest NSA spying revelations and troubles with the Affordable Care Act rollout dominate Washington, D.C. The panel weighs in on those stories and takes one last look at state and local races before Tuesday's election. Plus, we get post-Halloween action items from Live Wire host Luke Burbank.

Attn. General Says I-522 Donor Violated Campaign Finance Laws

Oct 31, 2013

Steve Scher talks with Attorney General Bob Ferguson about the lawsuit that finds No on I-522 donor, the Grocery Manufacturers Association, in violation of campaign finance laws. Penalties are expected after the election is over.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

A self-declared Socialist candidate for Seattle City Council is making waves among the city’s Democratic Party establishment.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

It’s down to the wire in the hotly contested Seattle mayor’s race.

With the public debates and forums now largely over, the campaigns have shifted to what is called the “ground game”—phone calling, doorbelling, sign waving.

Volunteers for incumbent Mayor Mike McGinn have knocked on more than 20,000 doors and made more than 150,000 phone calls so far, according to the campaign. Even though the mayor is behind in recent polls, the campaign has long claimed that it runs the superior field operation, and will make up the difference in the final days of the election.

Flickr Photo/John Boren (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington state has the nation’s highest minimum wage at $9.19 an hour. If voters in the City of SeaTac approve Proposition 1 next Tuesday, the city would boast the highest minimum wage in the country.

Opponents of the proposition say that although the purpose of the proposition is to provide higher-paying jobs, its real consequence would be fewer jobs and more competition from workers from nearby cities.

Washington state Senator Ed Murray
Flickr Photo/Matt Westervelt

Sen. Ed Murray sat down with The Record's Marcie Sillman ahead of the Seattle's mayoral election to discuss a range of topics, from public safety, transportation and development.

Produced by David Hyde.

Mayor Mike McGinn
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Mayor Mike McGinn sat down with The Record's Marcie Sillman to discuss a range of topics, from public safety, transportation and development.

Produced by David Hyde.

Flickr Photo/John Boren (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It’s Friday — time to talk over the week's news with Joni Balter of the Seattle Times, Crosscut's Knute Berger, and C.R. Douglas of Q13 FOX News.

The City of SeaTac is debating whether to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Seattle is considering two proposals that would impact City Council races and we take another look at the Seattle mayoral race with less than two weeks to go before Election Day.

Plus, we talk over the Affordable Care Act's glitchy start and check in with Live Wire host Luke Burbank.

Flickr Photo/Canadian Pacific

This election, Seattle residents have the opportunity to change the way they are represented by the city government.  Charter Amendment 19 on the ballot would change the look of the City Council – instead of all nine members being elected at large to represent the whole city, voters would elect seven of those members by the districts they live in.  The two remaining seats would continue to be elected by a citywide vote.

The Record’s Marcie Sillman sat down with an advocate from each side of the issue: Marjorie Rhodes from Choices, Not Districts; and Eugene Wasserman from Seattle Districts Now.

Flickr Photo/Alan Turkus

Suwanee Pringle, a worker at a shop at Sea-Tac International Airport, lights up at the mention of Proposition 1, which would raise her wage to $15 an hour.

"I’m really going to be happy, " Pringle said. "So I can afford to pay all my bills. Now I cannot afford to eat. I eat a cup of noodles even though I work so hard."

Flickr Photo/Angelo Carosio

When you fill out your ballot in the coming days, you should know that the people you elect to the Seattle City Council might just stay there for a long time.

That’s because Seattle City Council incumbents rarely lose. In fact, only five incumbents have lost in the last 20 years. And three of those were elected in the wake of a 2003 scandal in which strip club operators illegally gave campaign money to council members.

Live Debate On I-517: The Initiative On Initiatives

Oct 24, 2013
Flickr Photo/Vox Efx (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Initiative 517 is an initiative on initiatives, designed to make it easier to qualify initiatives for the ballot. I-517 would expand the time allotted to gather signatures for initiatives, as well as increase the areas where gatherers can go. It would also make it a crime to interfere, inhibit or restrict gatherers and require a public vote on any local initiative that qualifies — even if there is a legal challenge.

Steve Scher talks with both sides of the initiative in a live debate: Kai Huschke, an organizer for the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund, and Representative Marko Liias from Washington’s 21st district.

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

If voters here approve Initiative 522, a measure to require producers to label foods made with genetically modified ingredients, Washington will join two other states that recently enacted similar laws.

Flickr Photo/Canadian Pacific

This November voters in the city of Seattle will have a chance to decide whether or not City Council races should be publicly funded. Proposition 1 would create a program that funnels public money to candidates who decide to opt in to the program. To qualify, prospective candidates have to receive donations of at least $10 from 600 voters. If they do, they will receive six public dollars for every one dollar they raise up to $210,000 dollars.

Courtesy of the mayoral campaigns

The 2013 Seattle mayoral race has been rife with finger pointing, questions about leadership style and the source of campaign contributions. For the average voter, the debate may not include enough substantive conversation about the meat and potato issues that face Seattle citizens: How do we pay to fix our roadways? Where do we funnel new density? Are we as safe as possible in our homes and in public venues?

In the food business, everything comes down to that moment when a shopper studies a label and decides whether to buy or move on. That’s why food producers have a big interest in Washington’s Initiative 522 on the ballot next month.

Attorney General Bob Ferguson has gotten his wish: A list of donors to a political action committee created to fight Initiative 522, which, if passed, would require the labeling of foods containing genetically modified products.

The Grocery Manufacturers Association established its PAC on Thursday, the day after Ferguson filed suit against the association for failing to release its donor list. 

Flickr Photo/Lady_Fox

Washington could become the first state to require mandatory GMO labels if voters approve Initiative 522.  But some voters are still confused about the role GMOs play in our food system and in the environment. The Record's Steve Scher gets the facts from Seattle Times reporter Sandi Doughton.

Agribusiness and the food industry have pumped a record $17 million into Washington state so far to defeat Initiative 522.

What's The Future Of The King County Council?

Oct 21, 2013
KUOW/Kara McDermott

Seattle Times political reporter Emily Hefter tells The Record's Steve Scher what's hot (and what's not) in this year's three contested races for King County Council. 

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Two new polls in the Seattle mayor’s race show State Senator Ed Murray leading incumbent mayor Mike McGinn.

But the polls,which came out Monday, differ on the extent of Murray’s lead.

Flickr Photo/Alex Baden-Meyer

This election, the labeling of GMOs, or genetically modified foods, is one of the most hotly contested initiatives on the ballot. Big industries, led by Monsanto and the Grocery Manufacturers Association, have poured millions of dollars into fighting against a labeling requirement. Proponents have mounted vigorous and emotional debates in favor.

So what’s the root of the debate?

The state of Washington grows about 300 types of crops -- from the lush valleys north of Seattle, to the orchards of the Columbia Basin, to the rolling fields between Spokane and Walla Walla. And if you ask any of those farmers about Washington’s Initiative 522 and you’ll get every kind of answer.

Courtesy of Washington State University

It’s Friday — time to talk over the week's news with Crosscut's Knute BergerEli Sanders of The Stranger and KIRO 7's Essex Porter.

Congress reached a deal to reopen the government and avoid defaulting on the national debt. Have we turned the page or will things be right back where they started come January?

Also, we remember Eastern Washington Congressman and former Speaker of the House Tom Foley, who passed away today at 84. 

The panel checks in on Seattle's mayoral race and one state legislative contest that's drawing big money, and Live Wire host Luke Burbank joins us from Los Angeles.

Week In Review Web Extra

We look at a new study that finds Washington state is doing better than most when it comes to the cost of doing business.

Candidate Websites

Seattle school board candidate Suzanne Dale Estey and her supporters are poised to raise more money than any other school board candidate in state history – even though a Washington state law passed last year put a cap on campaign contributions in school board races.

Flickr Photo/Ryan Sitzman

UPDATE: 10/18/13, 2:30 p.m. PT.

This story does not reflect recent donations of approximately $150,000 made to a political action committee that supports Whatcom County Council candidates believed to be sympathetic to the proposed coal terminal in Bellingham, Wash. Donations were made to Save Whatcom, a conservative PAC.

Original Post:

A relatively small county council election in Washington state’s far northwest corner could play a major role in the future of the US coal industry.

The Whatcom County council could end up casting the deciding votes to permit the controversial dock for the Gateway Pacific Terminal, which would transfer coal from trains onto ships bound for Asia. It would be the largest coal export terminal on the West Coast.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The TV ad wars have begun in the Seattle mayor’s race.

This week, supporters of state Senator Ed Murray are running an ad that has some women’s advocates up in arms.

Photo courtesy of Jan Angel and Nathan Schlicher

A California billionaire has pumped $400,000 into the race for a single seat in the Washington state senate. Out-of-state businesses and political groups have poured tens of thousands into the election as well.

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