Education

From The Past To The Present In Our Communties

Aug 6, 2014
KUOW Photo / Jenny Asarnow

What are the amazing stories in our community that get looked over? Nia Price-Nascimento learns about West Coast jazz by starting in her sub-basement, and Ahlaam Ibraahim shares how computer science has a huge affect on one girl's life.  

RadioActive is KUOW's program for high school students. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook.

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

When it comes to brain development, time in the classroom may be less important than time on the playground.

Why Drowning Is A 'Cultural Condition'

Aug 5, 2014
KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

Public health researchers have struggled with a leading cause of death in young children: drowning.

Black children face the highest risk – even when they're supervised. The most recent data for Washington state shows black children have more than 3.5 times the drowning risk of children of any other race.

When Kids Start Playing To Win

Aug 5, 2014

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

It's a playful word that's developed something of a bad reputation: "competition." The fear among some parents is that, once children start playing to win, at around 5 years old, losing isn't just hard. It's devastating.

Brains At Play

Aug 4, 2014

This week at NPR Ed, our series Playing To Learn will explore questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

I'm joined now by my colleague on the NPR Ed Team, Cory Turner. He's done most of our Common Core reporting, and he edited this postcard series. Cory, thanks for coming in.

CORY TURNER, BYLINE: Thanks for having me, Eric.

Months after a girl took the company to task for its female toy figures, Lego has released the Research Institute, a play set created by a "real-life geophysicist, Ellen Kooijman," the company says.

Common App Advice From A College Counselor

Aug 1, 2014

Today, high school seniors can begin to apply to colleges online through the Common Application. This resource allows students to apply to many colleges at the same time, and in some cases even use the same essay.

But the Common App had major glitches last year and a majority of colleges were unable to download application information. This year, there is new software and hope that the problems are resolved.

The Common App is considered a tool for students, but both parents and applicants have lots of question about the best way to use it.

Flickr Photo/Barnaby Wasson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The backers of an initiative to increase pay and training for child care workers in Seattle have filed suit against the city for the way the measure will appear on the fall ballot.

KUOW’s Ann Dornfeld reports.

Getting The Look: Northwest Student Athletes Vie For Scholarships

Jul 29, 2014
Courtesy of Chris Grant

Getting recognized by any college is a high school athlete's dream. Today, Ahlaam Ibraahim and Angela Nguyen talk to Northwest athletes regarding their goals, experiences, and words of wisdom about how to get exposure -- and how to fulfill the dream of a Division I college scholarship.

Oregon is waiting to hear whether its application for a continued federal waiver from the No Child Left Behind law will be approved.

It's hot out. The usual midday thunderstorm has just passed, and the few kids hanging out on bleachers around the pool at Miami's Ransom Everglades School finally get the go-ahead to jump in and cool off.

Eight-year-old Gary Kendrick and the others are all here for swim lessons.

"They told us to hold on to the wall and kick our feet and, like, move our arms," Kendrick says. "When I had to swim to one of the counselors, I was really swimming. I ain't even know I was moving."

A Tale Of Two High Schools

Jul 24, 2014
KUOW Photo / Jenny Asarnow

Is high school truly filled with stereotypes? Ahlaam Ibraahim and Esa Tilija investigate the stereotypes of their schools: Rainier Beach High School, a public school in south Seattle, and University Prep, a private school in north Seattle.

Many people are intensely interested in how publicly funded charter schools affect children, and that includes not just their academic achievement but their health.

Researchers from UCLA and the Rand Corp. wanted to know whether attending a high-performing charter school reduced the rates of risky health behaviors among low-income minority teenagers.

(July 24, 2014: See the editor's note at the bottom of this page for an explanation of the story's new headline.)

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

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