Education

Steven Pinker's book "The Sense of Style."

Ross Reynolds speaks with cognitive scientist Steven Pinker, who is both a fan and critic of writing style guides. He’s now written his own: “The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century!” He says many authors of style guides don’t understand the cognitive biases that lead to us write poorly.

A group in the Boise area is in the midst of fundraising for a new attraction in the Northwest. It'll be called the Northwest Science Museum.

Schools often struggle to investigate cases of sexual assault, and even more so when they occur between people of the same gender.

But a new law aimed at college campuses — which takes effect today — expands the definition of sexual violence to include dating violence and stalking and to clarify that same-sex assaults are covered, too.

John Kelly, a senior at Tufts University in Medford, Mass., helped make those new rules.

AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File

Most of us heard poetry as babies — nursery rhymes, lullabies, that sort of thing. By the time we reach adulthood, though, poetry is no longer part of our every day lives.

Former U.S. Poet Laureate Ted Kooser says poetry has become something scary. Kooser traces that fear  back to the early 20th century, when modernist poets like T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound were popular.

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

At the Alaska Airlines ticket counter at Sea-Tac Airport, parents Ron and Christine Vega wait for their boarding passes.

Their son, Gibson, 5, carries a blue backpack that has essentials for a mock airplane trip: snacks, things to keep him preoccupied and a white cloth towel that helps him deal with stress.

The walls are lined with robots and movie posters for Star Wars and Back to the Future. But this is no 1980s nerd den. It's the technology lab at Westside Neighborhood School in Los Angeles, and the domain of its ed-tech coordinator, Don Fitz-Roy.

"So we're gonna be talking about digital citizenship today."

Opening arguments began today in the trial of 12 Atlanta educators charged in an alleged cheating conspiracy that came to light in 2009.

Prosecutors claim there was widespread cheating on state tests throughout the city's public schools, affecting thousands of students.

The case has brought national attention to the issue, raising questions about whether the pressures to improve scores have driven a few educators to fudge the numbers, but also about broader consequences.

We've known for a long time that inequality and systemic educational barriers are holding back many young African-Americans. President Obama has led an initiative to help close the opportunity gap for young black men.

In many communities, the local school district is the largest food provider, filling thousands of hungry bellies every day. But trying to feed healthful food to some of the pickiest eaters can result in mountains of wasted food.

Now, many schools are finding that giving kids a say in what they eat can cut down on what ends up in the trash.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Seattle Public Schools Interim Superintendent Larry Nyland about the challenges ahead as he takes charge of Seattle Public Schools.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Jillian Smith, a student at Seattle Pacific University, recently returned to the building where a fatal shooting had taken place months before.

How To Make The Most Of Your 10 Minutes With Teacher

Sep 18, 2014

So you finally get the chance to meet one on one with your child's teacher — now what?

Like a good Boy Scout, be prepared: Educators agree that doing your homework before a parent-teacher conference can make a big difference.

British Columbia's Teacher Strike Nears End

Sep 17, 2014
Credit Flickr Photo/Bryan Jackson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the tentative deal reached to end British Columbia's longest school strike. In addition, he compares British Columbia's court battle over education to the one in Washington state. 
Flickr Photo/Thomas Hawk

  Ross Reynolds talks with Sandra Stotsky, University of Arkansas education professor emerita, about Bill Gates' push to bring a new model of teaching history to classrooms around the world. 

How much would you pay a counselor to help your child get into a top college? And what if that fee came with a guarantee, or your money back?

If your child works with Steven Ma, owner and founder of Think Tank Learning, the starting fee for guaranteed admission is about $40,000. But some kids, with special contracts, pay between $600,000 and $1,000,0000.

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