Education

Ross Reynolds interviews James Redford, director of the documentary "Paper Tigers" that debuted at the Seattle International Film Festival.

The films tells the story of how Lincoln Alternative High School in Walla Walla, Washington, was plagued with unrest until they adopted a new trauma sensitive approach program. It’s had spectacular results with keeping kids in school and raising graduation rates.

The film includes footage shot by the high school students at the school. Redford is the co-founder with his actor father Robert Redford of the Redford Center.

I started off wondering whether I might be able to spell a few of the words right. I ended up realizing that most of them I had never even heard of before.

Iridocyclitis. Cibarial. Pyrrhuloxia. And so on.

It was one of the many surprises of an evening spent watching the finals of the Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday night near Washington.

Another big surprise was how much I thoroughly enjoyed it.

I had expected to see a bunch of highly trained kids who've spent months and years memorizing the dictionary, essentially regurgitating that information.

RadioActive Tests The Issues

May 28, 2015
Scantron test
Flickr Photo/biologycorner (CC-BY-NC-ND)

This month RadioActive is taking issues on the minds of many Seattleites. We’ll hear about standardized testing in the Seattle school district, diversity issues in the Tukwila school district and a profile of the first Islamophobia Awareness Day. Plus we'll hear about one woman’s experience as a reporter during the Sri Lankan civil war.

RadioActive is KUOW's program for youth age 16-20ish. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter.

The Solar Pioneer protest barge in Elliot Bay with the Shell oil drilling rig in the background.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Shell’s Arctic oil drilling plans, Seattle’s waterfront tunnel, the $15 minimum wage movement – are they all unstoppable? And if Washington state’s drought is unstoppableon the east side of the mountains and we have plenty of water on the west side, should you take as long a shower as you want?

Bill Radke debates the week’s news with LiveWire’s Luke Burbank, Republican Chris Vance and political blogger Erica C. Barnett.

Last month, a Chinese government think tank bashed history professors from Harvard, Georgetown and other leading American universities regarding things they wrote — at least 15 years ago — about events that occurred more than two centuries ago.

"This was a uniquely vitriolic attack," says Georgetown's Jim Millward. The article calls him as "arrogant," "overbearing" and an "imperialist," and dismisses Millward's and his colleagues' scholarship as "academically absurd."

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Teachers marched in the streets of Seattle Tuesday. It was part of a one-day walkout. They were protesting what they call the state Legislature’s failure to fully fund education. 

Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Many of them ended up at Seattle Center.

Our story last week about the connection between ADHD, movement and thinking struck a nerve with readers. We reported on a small study in which students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder performed better on memory tasks when they were allowed to spin and move around in a swiveling chair.

At schools that offer comprehensive sex education, students tend to get the biology and the basics — they'll learn about sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy, how to put a condom on a banana and the like.

But some public health researchers and educators are saying that's not enough. They're making the case that sex ed should include discussion about relationships, gender and power dynamics.

Protesters hold signs around a table populated by UW Regents.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds talks to Taylor Kuykendall, a coal reporter for SNL Energy, about the University of Washington's decision to divest from thermal coal.  

On a sunny spring day at MIT in Cambridge, Mass., students line up at a table grabbing ice cream sundaes, milk and cookies, and, if they're interested, a hug from MIT parents including Sonal Patel.

"Yes!" Patel says, "giving away ice cream and now hugs."

"Oh, I want a hug," a student says, "that will be good."

The event — billed as "Stress Less Day" — is sponsored by the student mental health awareness group Active Minds. Volunteers are handing out fliers listing mental health facts and campus resources.

Sophomore Matt Ossa gets his ice cream and rushes on.

"How well do today's schools prepare for tomorrow's world?"

That's the question in a new report from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. This group administers the Program for International Student Assessment to 15-year-olds in 75 countries. The goal is to find out whether they can use their math and science knowledge to answer a series of questions that measure skills needed for young people to make a contribution to the economy.

Student activists Angela Feng, Sarra Tekola and Alex Lenferna of Divest UW appear before the UW Board of Regents on March 12, 2015 to urge the university to get rid of its coal investments.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

David Hyde speaks with Vox.com writer David Roberts who says student activists at the UW and elsewhere are changing the debate about climate change by making it a moral issue.

If you've followed education in the news or at the book store in the past couple of years, chances are you've heard of "grit." It's often defined as the ability to persevere when times get tough, or to delay gratification in pursuit of a goal.

Gov. Jay Inslee signs a bill expanding the College Bound program. Behind him, middle schoolers from Mill Creek Middle School in Kent. At far left is Sen. David Frockt, who wrote the bill.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill into law Tuesday that expands the College Bound Scholarship program. The program places students from low-income families onto a college prep track as they're wrapping up middle school, and it helps pay their college tuition when they graduate from high school.

Christian Cultee, a student at the Northwest Indian College, with a rocket that broke the sound barrier.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

It started out as a joke. 

The students at Northwest Indian College on the Lummi Reservation near Bellingham were launching little rockets made from recycled water bottles as a way to do some hands-on science.

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