This photo at the Nordic Heritage Museum exhibit shows Ivar Haglund 'surrounded by acres of clams,' a reference to his resaturant theme song.
Courtesy of Ivar’s

Think of a simpler Seattle in 1938: No Jeff Bezos, no Bill Gates, no dawn to dusk traffic jams. Instead there was Ivar Haglund, restaurateur and showman with a penchant for the preposterous.

Knute Berger told KUOW’s David Hyde that a new exhibit at the Nordic Heritage Museum tells Ivar’s story. It’s “part of that Northwest sensibility that leads you to grunge, leads you to … who wants to be New York? You know, we came here for other reasons,” Berger said. “And he really got that.”

People apply for jobs at Coca-Cola at a jobs fair hosted by the Congressional Black Caucus in Miami, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011.
AP Photo/Lynne Sladky

Blacks – especially black women – working in the public sector were disproportionately laid off during the recession, according to a new study by the University of Washington.

The study is being presented this week at a conference of the American Sociological Association. It found that white workers appear to have been better protected from financial shocks to government budgets.

Led by an 8.5 percent drop in China's Shanghai composite index, U.S. and global stock markets took a dive Monday. Shortly after opening, the Dow Jones index fell by more than 1,000 points, or 5 percent. The Dow then zigzagged to close at 15,871, losing about 3.6 percent of its value.

The ACLU placed a full-page ad in the Seattle TImes.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Friday's Seattle Times newspaper contains a full-page ad from the American Civil Liberties Union. It’s an open letter to Amazon employees, offering to help sue the company if they believe their rights have been violated.  

The Portland Development Commission this week launched a $3 million fund to invest in startups founded by women and minorities.

File photo of softball and mitt
Flickr Photo/Hillarie (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Why should the rest of us care whether Amazon employees love or hate their jobs? How can we make wildfires less destructive? What are we teaching our kids when we tell them to throw a little league game to win a tournament?

Bill Radke debates the week’s news with New York Times writer David Streitfeld, Geekwire's Todd Bishop, former GOP leader Bill Finkbeiner, state Senator Michael Baumgartner, former firefighter Kyle Dickman and journalist Erica C. Barnett.

A recent New York Times article about harsh workplace culture at Amazon called attention to how the online retailer handles evaluations: Any co-worker can critique another any time, anonymously. Less exhaustive versions of the peer performance review — or 360 review as they're often known — have been popular for several years.

Liban Ahmed handles baggage at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. He says he'll use the extra money to buy a car, save for college and visit his mom in Mogadishu, who he has not seen in 15 years.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

About 4,700 workers at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport are about to get a big raise. The Washington Supreme Court has ruled that the city of SeaTac’s $15 an hour minimum wage applies to airport employees.

Lovincer from Uganda works managing her fresh banana business to support her family.
Facebook Photo/Kiva

Jessica Jackley was a liberal arts major who stumbled her way into the Stanford MBA program.

Philosophy and business came together for her in 2005 when she helped start Kiva, the world’s first person- to-person microlending website. Kiva facilitates lending to poor and underserved entrepreneurs and students in 83 countries.

If you watch the news shows on Sunday mornings, or cable news at night, you've probably seen that ad where parents are dropping off their daughter at college. And then they start to fret about, well, something involving access to investment advice.

The ad ends by urging you to "Tell Congress: Fix this now."

The "steady upward climb" in job creation around the Northwest continues this summer.

Ross Reynolds talks with Kelly McBride, media ethicist at the Poynter Institute, about the backlash from the New York Times' story "Inside Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace." The paper's public editor Margaret Sullivan has weighed in, saying the story was "driven less by irrefutable proof than by generalization and anecdote." Was the story fair? 

Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Former and current employees are getting a letter from Microsoft this week.

It says no more Microsoft stock will be bought for the company’s 401k plan. The question is why.

Why Does Amazon Think It's A Startup?

Aug 18, 2015

Ross Reynolds talks with Chris Devore, managing director of Techstars, about how Amazon can act like a startup even though it's really not one.

Michael McCabe knows what it's like to be surrounded by zombies.

Zombie houses, that is.

McCabe still lives in the neighborhood where he grew up, Woodbury Heights, N.J., a middle-class suburb of Philadelphia. He knows which houses are in foreclosure and which have been abandoned. The latest seems to be right behind his own.