People form a greeting line as Chinese President Xi Jinping and his wife step out of a Boeing 747 at Everett's Paine Field.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The tech and business leaders meeting with President Xi Jinping in Seattle this week know a lot about doing business in China — the risks as well as the opportunities.

Solar company REC Silicon Tuesday warned of big layoffs at a factory in central Washington if a trade dispute between the U.S. and China drags on much longer.

Sunlight Toy Factory, Tangxia, China taken in 2010.
Flickr Photo/Chris (CC BY NC)/

David Hyde speaks with University of Washington philosophy professor Michael Blake about the moral responsibilities of business leaders who meet with China's President Xi Jinping during his visit to Seattle.

Washington’s second largest industry, agriculture, is looking for a place at the negotiation table Tuesday with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

Ross Reynolds talks to Porter Erisman, a former vice president at Alibaba -- the biggest e-commerce site on the Web -- about his new book, "Alibaba's World: How A Remarkable Chinese Company is Changing the Face of Global Business."

Chinese President Xi Jinping visits Bali, Indonesia for the 2013  Applied Power Electronics Conference.
Flickr Photo/APEC 2013 (CC BY 2.0)/

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Todd Bishop, co-founder and editor of technology news site GeekWire, about why Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit to Seattle is putting U.S. tech leaders on the spot. Bishop wrote a FAQ on President Xi's visit for GeekWire.

Jeannie Yandel talks to Luke Timmerman of the Timmerman Report about Chris Rivera's tenure as President of the Washington Biotechnology And Biomedical Association. 

Chinese President Xi Jinping will meet with titans of Northwest commerce Tuesday and Wednesday on their home turf: Think Boeing, Starbucks, Microsoft and Amazon.

The container yard at the Port of Lewiston, Idaho, looks forgotten. A tall crane next to the Clearwater River sits parked and unused.

Off in the distance, two orange metal shipping containers lie side-by-side, surrounded by asphalt in every direction.

"Last year, there would've been probably 250 containers here," says David Doeringsfeld, the port's general manager.

The state unemployment rate in Washington and Oregon was falling at a steady pace in recent years. But lately it's stuck.

Cyberthieves steal hundreds of millions of dollars a year from the bank accounts of U.S. businesses. And many business owners are surprised to find out their bank is not obliged to make them whole.

Dr. David Krier's Volunteer Voyages is one of the victims. Krier says he lost over $14,000 through fraudulent withdrawals from his business account, and he says his bank "refused to cover any of my losses."

China President Xi Jinping.
Flickr Photo/Global Panorama (Michel Temer) (CC BY SA 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jon Talton about the economic connections between Washington state and China, and how they might play out in Chinese President Xi Jinping's upcoming visit.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle has become the latest landing place for a wave of Chinese investments – much of it coming through a controversial investor visa program called EB-5.

EB-5 is bringing construction money and jobs to the Seattle economy. But it may also have brought spies, fraudsters and absconders to our region. Now the fate of the program is just as murky, as it could expire at the end of the month.

Thornton Place Apartments in Seattle's Northgate neighborhood has 56 apartments (out of 278) set aside for low wage earners. In exchange for keeping rents for those units low for 12 years, the developer got a tax break.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

When it comes to creating affordable housing, Seattle voters can thank themselves.

Most rent-controlled units built in the last 30 years have relied on a property tax, Seattle's affordable housing levy, first approved by Seattleites in the early 1980s. That's when federal money for affordable housing was cut dramatically under President Ronald Reagan.

In what is the first major policy announcement by U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch, the Justice Department has asked civil and criminal investigators to focus on individuals instead of corporations when looking into white-collar crime.

In prepared remarks obtained by NPR's Carrie Johnson, Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates will say later today that a "crime is crime."