Business

Crabber Tom Petersen would rather have his crab pots on the floor of the Pacific, but a toxic algae bloom has prompted health officials to close the south Washington coast to commercial and recreational crabbing.
KUOW Photo/Ashley Ahearn

TOKELAND, Wash. – Tom Petersen’s 50-foot crab boat sits idly in the Port of Willapa Harbor, a tiny coastal inlet 40 or so miles north of the mouth of the Columbia River.

On a normal day in early summer, Petersen would be selling Dungeness crab to canneries, big-city buyers and even fresh off the back of his boat to locals and tourists.

Fireworks over Lake Union on July 4, 2014.
Flickr Photo/Scooter Lowrimore (CC BY 2.0)

When the rocket’s red glare of the Seafair Fourth of July fireworks go off Saturday night, the show will be the creation of Heather Gobet.

July 1 will be a big day in Oregon for adults who like to use marijuana. That's when the state's voter-approved legalization of recreational pot takes effect.

Seattle's Real Change Newspaper Impresses With Pay App

Jun 25, 2015
Robert Surles sells Real Change, Seattle's homeless paper, at First Avenue and Yesler Way.
KUOW Photo/Ashley Stewart

Robert Surles is out on First Avenue and Yesler Way every day.

He’s selling Real Change, Seattle’s homeless newspaper.

The Northwest’s mild winter and warm spring has been good for blueberries. And now Washington and Oregon are on-track to harvest record crops this year.

When it comes to online video, the world is glued to YouTube. People watch billions of videos on it every day. And that huge share of online eyeballs is why other companies are trying to chip away at its dominance and lure some of its biggest stars away from the service.

The production line at a Boeing facility.
Courtesy/Boeing Company

Ross Reynolds talks to Jon Ostrower, aerospace reporter for the Wall Street Journal, about the challenges facing Boeing's new CEO, Dennis Muilenburg. 

Washington Cherry Growers Grapple With Drought, Labor Issues

Jun 24, 2015
Stemilt Growers, a cherry packing facility in Wenatchee, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Jay Inslee (CC BY ND 2.0)

Kim Malcolm speaks with Northwest News Network's Anna King about Washington's cherry industry. Water restrictions and labor shortages have thrown up some hurdles for local producers, but this year's crop is still expected to produce about 15 million boxes of cherries.

The State Department says it is working around the clock on a computer problem that's having widespread impact on travel into the U.S. The glitch has practically shut down the visa application process.

Of the 50,000 visa applications received every day, only a handful of emergency visas are getting issued.

When you flip on a light switch, odds are, you're burning coal. But as the fracking boom continues to unleash huge quantities of natural gas, the nation's electric grid is changing. Power plants are increasingly turning to this low-cost, cleaner-burning fossil fuel.

Bill Pentak stands in the middle of a construction site, looking up at his company's latest project towering overhead — a new natural gas power plant.

Columbia Center Tower in downtown Seattle.
Flickr Photo/David Schott

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about the upside to Chinese investment in Seattle's real estate market.

Northwest sweet cherry experts are reporting that some orchards are having a hard time getting their fruit picked this year.

Oregon farmers could soon be more likely to use a mediator to help settle their disputes with neighboring farmers.

Cynthia Tee is the executive director of Ada Developers Academy, a coding school for women in Seattle.
Courtesy of Cynthia Tee

In a nondescript classroom in downtown Seattle, young women hunch over laptops, staring at lines of code.

These women, most of them in their 20s and 30s, are enrolled at Ada Developers Academy. This competitive program offers women free tuition and a stipend – all in the name of getting more women into the tech industry.

The marijuana industry has a pesticide problem. Many commercial cannabis growers use chemicals to control bugs and mold. But the plant's legal status is unresolved.

The grow room at Medical MJ Supply in Fort Collins, Colo., has all the trappings of a modern marijuana cultivation facility: glowing yellow lights, plastic irrigation tubes, and rows of knee-high cannabis plants.

"We're seeing a crop that's probably in it third or fourth week," says Nick Dice, the owner.

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