Business

Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)

Boeing announced quarterly earnings Wednesday morning that beat analysts' expectations. CEO Jim McNerney said part of the company's success story is the new economics of its labor force.

At a time when fast-food workers make an average of about $9 an hour, what are the chief executives bringing home?

According to a new report, YUM! (owner of KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut) compensated its CEO $22 million in 2013.

Chipotle's CEO took home $13.8 million in total compensation. And McDonald's CEO compensation totaled $7.7 million. (Compensation includes salary, bonus and the value of exercised options.)

Technically, consumers are supposed to pay taxes on things they buy online. In fact, few do.

Congress is considering a bill called the Marketplace Fairness Act that would force many online sellers to collect sales taxes for the first time.

In the meantime, some states have already enacted so-called Amazon taxes, forcing the giant online retailer to collect sales taxes the same way traditional brick-and-mortar stores do.

Flickr Photo/torbakhopper (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Taylor Hoang, owner of the Pho Cyclo Cafe, about the minimum wage debate in Seattle.

As an immigrant business owner, Hoang is in favor of a proposal that would implement a much lower minimum wage. The proposal would raise the minimum wage to $10.35 and gradually increase to $15 over the next 10 years.

Flickr Photo/Tax Credits (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about the growing income gap between CEOs and workers.

The Northwest’s budding marijuana industry means opportunity for pot consultants.

The encryption code unlocked by the Heartbleed bug last week provided vital security for some of the most widely used websites on the Internet. Fortune 1000 companies rely on the open source code for their core business. But it turns out no one is paying for it.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Today, some 30,000 people will converge in Denver, Colo. for the 5th annual Cannabis Cup, a marijuana festival and tradeshow. It's the first time the event is being held after legal marijuana sales went into effect January 1 of this year. To learn more about the event, we're joined by Ricardo Baca. He's the editor of "The Cannabist" blog at the Denver Post. Thanks so much for being with us, Ricardo.

RICARDO BACA: Hey. Thank you.

David Hyde talks with Seattle City Councilmember Nick Licata about why he's pushing for better enforcement of labor standards in Seattle.

Courtesy of Washington State Senate

As Washington state Senator Rodney Tom announced his decision to not seek re-election this week, how does his departure change the dynamic in the legislature.

Also, Boeing is shipping nearly 2,000 engineering and research jobs out of the state. After the big push for friendly tax breaks for the company, is this a betrayal? 

Steve Scher reviews these stories and more with news analyst Joni Balter, Crosscut's Knute Berger, Eli Sanders of The Stranger and Livewire host Luke Burbank.

The workplace has become a more understanding place for pregnant women or new moms these days. Many companies now have lactation rooms and offer more liberal maternity and paternity leave policies than in years past.

But for some women, pregnancy can still be a career liability.

Heather Myers was fresh out of high school and working at a Wal-Mart in Salina, Kan., in 2006 when she found out she was pregnant. She kept a water bottle with her on the sales floor, as her doctor recommended. Then, her supervisor intervened.

The American workforce might want to pay attention to all those brown trucks full of cardboard boxes. UPS is using technology in ways that may soon be common throughout the economy.

On the surface, UPS trucks look the same as they did more than 20 years ago, when Bill Earle started driving for the company in rural Pennsylvania.

But underneath the surface, Earle says, the job has changed a lot. The thing you sign your name on when the UPS guy gives you a package used to be a piece of paper. Now it's a computer that tells Earle everything he needs to know.

Flickr Photo/Andrew W. Sieber (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Times aerospace reporter Dominic Gates about Boeing moving engineering jobs out of Everett and Washington state.

As San Francisco experiences a historic economic boom, partly fueled by an influx of tech workers and companies, some activists say that not all city residents are reaping the benefits.

Google bus protests are becoming an increasingly regular occurrence in San Francisco, with activists targeting the bus that takes Google workers from San Francisco to Silicon Valley.

There was another protest on Friday, where protesters held signs with the name of a Google executive who is also a landlord. Activists say he’s unfairly evicting tenants.

Courtesy of WeWork

The millennial generation is taking control over how they work and how they live. The group, currently about 18 to 33 years old, is adopting technology that is disrupting old structures and writing the playbook on how to take advantage of technological change.

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