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11:08 am
Tue August 6, 2013

What Should Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos Do With The Washington Post?

Flickr Photo/Adam Glanzman

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced plans to buy the Washington Post for $250 million yesterday. The news came as a shock to most of the media. But former journalist-turned-Silicon-Valley-CEO Alan Mutter says it may be the best move for an ailing industry. Ross Reynolds asks Alan why.

Changing Media Landscape
5:58 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Jeff Bezos Brings Entrepreneurial Mindset To Washington Post Purchase

Jeff Bezos is illuminated by a display screen at the introduction of the new Amazon Kindle Fire HD and Kindle Paperwhite in Santa Monica, Calif., Sept. 6, 2012.
AP Photo/Reed Saxon

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has purchased the Washington Post for $250 million, and that has a lot of people wondering what's next for the legacy media company.

Brad Stone, senior writer for Bloomberg Businessweek, has written a book about the mega-entrepreneur. It's called, "The Everything Store,” due out in October. He said the sale was a surprise for many, but in keeping with the way Bezos thinks.

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Nonprofit Management
12:04 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

The Business Model Of Foreign Aid

Seattle’s Gates Foundation has lead the charge to push foreign aid organizations to be more efficient and effective — more like businesses. But critics say that when it comes to helping poor people, a return on investment can’t be the only measure of success. 

So how is the push to become more business-like changing the world of aid, development and philanthropy?  Ross Reynolds hears from Tom Paulson, the founder and editor of the news blog Humanosphere. He writes regularly about global development and aid.

Labor Movement
12:31 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

The Future Of Labor Movements In America

Fast food workers around the country are agitating for higher wages and better working conditions. Here in Seattle, workers are trying to get fast food restaurant managers arrested for the crime of wage theft. Ross Reynolds hears from New York Times labor reporter Steven Greenhouse about what these protests say about the state of labor in America. Greenhouse recently reported on the fast food strikes in the New York Times.

Entrepreneurship
7:57 am
Thu August 1, 2013

'Hackerspaces' Double As Private Incubators For Entrepreneurship

Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 10:17 am

"Hackerspaces" are popping up all over the Northwest. But these aren't dens of computer infiltrators.

What we're talking about are community workshops for tinkering, machine tooling, 3-D printing and any other hands-on creativity you can think of. Some market themselves under the more benign-sounding label of "maker space." These workshops are now drawing attention as private incubators for entrepreneurship.

But let's straighten out this name business.

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Amazing People
2:13 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

How A Blind Person Can "See" Using Echolocation

Bats use echolocation to "see." So does Brian Bushway.
Credit Flickr Photo/rogerwshaw

Brian Bushway is blind, but he says he can "see" just as well as anyone else using a technique called echolocation. Like a bat, he makes sounds with his mouth to locate and identify cars, bushes, walls and chain link fences. He can even ride a bicycle.

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, July 30:

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Pot Investment
11:27 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Potreprenuers Get Ready For A New Kind Of Drug Deal

Flickr Photo/Benoit Deniaud

With recreational pot legal in Washington state, the marijuana business is moving from back alleys to storefronts. Former Silicon Valley banker Brendan Kennedy wants to lead the way in the new pot economy. He is CEO of Privateer Holdings, a cannabis-focused venture capital fund. He’ll explain to Ross Reynolds why he sees it as a $50 billion legal business.

Mining Asteroids
11:30 am
Fri July 26, 2013

What Happens In Outer Space, Might Not Stay In Outer Space

Chris Lewicki, president and chief engineer of Planetary Resources.
Courtesy of Chris Lewicki

Last week the President’s plan to fund a mission to land on an asteroid was thwarted when the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology authorized a bill that will specifically prohibit the space agency from moving forward with the plan.

As arguments stall, funding for our government’s space programs in the private sector moves forward. Bellevue, Wash. is the home to one company that plans to not just land on an asteroid but to mine it for resources. Planetary Resources' president and chief engineer is Chris Lewicki. Ross Reynolds sits down with Lewicki to discuss his plans.

Raising The Minimum Wage
9:28 am
Fri July 26, 2013

SeaTac City Council Signs Off On “Good Jobs Initiative"

A food court at Sea-Tac airport. The initiative would cover about 6,500 workers, including those who work at airport restaurants.
Flickr Photo/Matt Biddolph

People in the City of SeaTac could vote this November on an initiative that would create a $15 an hour hour minimum wage for thousands of workers at Sea-Tac airport and other places. The so-called “Good Jobs Initiative” would apply to about 6,500 workers in transportation and hospitality jobs in the City of SeaTac. Tuesday night, the SeaTac City Council decided to allow the measure to go before voters.

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Wage Disparity
2:09 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

200 Berry Pickers Resume Strike In Skagit Valley

Workers have once again walked off the job at Sakuma Brothers Farms in Burlington protesting wages.
From Sakuma Market Stands' Facebook page.

For the second time in 10 days, workers at Sakuma Brothers Farms have gone on strike. More than 200 berry pickers have walked off the job at the farm near Burlington, saying they want the farm to pay more for each box of blueberries and strawberries they harvest.

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Hedreen Development
11:21 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Union Tries To Block Downtown Hotel Deal

Hotel development on the site of Seattle's Greyhound station is getting pushback from a union.
Flickr Photo/Matthew Rutledge

There are plans in the works to build a huge convention hotel on the site of Seattle’s Greyhound bus station. But the developer behind the hotel is threatening to cancel the project unless a union trying to block the project at city hall relents.

The union says the hotel would bring too many low-wage jobs to downtown Seattle. Ross Reynolds talks to Mark Stiles, a reporter at the Puget Sound Business Journal, who has been covering the story.

Environment And Business
8:00 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Environmental Debt With Amy Larkin

How can business and the natural world successfully coexist?
Flickr Photo/rlpporch

Environmental debt — global warming, extreme weather, pollution — is weakening the global economy. Amy Larkin, formerly of Greenpeace, discusses how the natural world and business can coexist. She spoke at the Elliott Bay Book Company on July 1.

Listener Call-In
11:39 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Is The Minimum Wage Too Low?

Correction 7/24/13:  In the original broadcast of this interview we misstated that Seattle City Council candidate Kshama Sawant advocates a minimum wage of $21.72 an hour. According to her campaign representative Devin Matthews, Sawant is calling for a $15.00 dollar minimum wage. 

A recent economic survey showed it costs over $52,000  for a one parent and one child family to live a modest lifestyle in Seattle. Would raising the minimum wage to $15.00 an hour bring more people closer to earning a living wage? Or would a $15.00 minimum wage just discourage employers from hiring? Ross Reynolds talks to Felix Salmon, financial reporter for Reuters, about the case for each side, and callers share their opinions on if we should raise the minimum wage.

GMO Bounce-Back
10:08 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Northwest Wheat Farmers Look Forward To Restored Market

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 12:57 pm

  The first bushels of Northwest wheat are coming off honey-colored fields in southeast Washington.

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Dreamliner Fires
11:11 am
Fri July 12, 2013

More Problems On 787s Mean Turbulence For Boeing Stock

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:40 am

A Boeing 787 caught fire on the tarmac at London's Heathrow Airport on Friday, followed hours later by a technical problem aboard another 'Dreamliner' that forced the plane to turn back from a trans-Atlantic flight. The incidents sent Boeing's stock down more than 7 percent at one point.

The first incident involved an Ethiopian Airlines plane with no passengers aboard. The second occurred aboard a Thomson Airways flight en route from Manchester, England to Sanford, Fla.

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