Best Of The Record

We've selected some of our favorite pieces from The Record's archives to enjoy again.

Pages

Vision Of Hope
1:19 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Wounded In Afghanistan, But Still Running

Edward Lychik was kind enough to lend a leg to Marcie.
Credit KUOW Photo/Matthew Streib

On Edward Lychik's 21st birthday, his fellow troops gave him a gift.

The Army combat engineer normally rode in the first truck in his convoy. Lychik's job was to ensure the road his battalion traveled in Afghanistan was bomb-free.

To celebrate Lychik's big day, his comrades let him ride in the rear — the convoy's last truck.

Read more
Online Privacy
2:42 pm
Fri June 20, 2014

Is It Possible To Change What Google Reveals About You?

Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington professor Joe Janes about online reputation management.

Seattle History
3:40 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

When Gay Kids Had To Sneak Around For Counseling

Representatives for Seattle Counseling Services at a Seattle gay pride event.
Flickr Photo/Derrick Coetzee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Ann McGettigan, executive director of Seattle Counseling Service, about the history of the organization and her role in the LGBT community. The program was founded in 1969, when its founder noticed that there were runaways in Pioneer Square -- many of them had been kicked out of their homes. 

Feature Interview
3:11 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

'I Am Home Now,' Says Gerald Hankerson, Former Lifer

Gerald Hankerson
Seattle.gov

Marcie Sillman talks with Gerald Hankerson, director at Main Street Alliance, president of the local NAACP and former lifer at the Washington state penitentiary.

Activism
3:24 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Geoffrey McGrath: The Inadvertent Spokesman For Gay Rights

Geoffrey McGrath delivers a petition bearing more than 125,000 signatures, urging Amazon to stop donating money to the Boy Scouts on May 21.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattleite Geoffrey McGrath about his path from a hiking/biking software engineer  to international spokesperson for gay rights after his membership from the Boy Scouts of America was revoked for his sexual orientation.

Music History
3:02 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Jimi Hendrix, Seattle And Race In Post-War American Culture

The Jimi Hendrix statue across the street from Seattle Central Community College on Capitol Hill.
Credit Flickr Photo/Charlie Brooks (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde speaks with cultural historian, musician and writer Peter Bacon Hales about Jimi Hendrix's cover of Bob Dylan's "All Along The Watchtower," which is the subject of a chapter in his new book, "Outside The Gates Of Eden: The Dream Of America From Hiroshima To Now."

One Survivor's Story
4:18 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Jennifer Hopper Reclaims Her Identity With Love And Honesty

Jennifer Hopper in KUOW's green room.
Credit KUOW Photo/Akiko Oda

A life can change in a moment.

For Jennifer Hopper, that moment was July 19, 2009, the night Isaiah Kalebu broke into the South Park home that Hopper shared with her fiancée Teresa Butz. The man repeatedly stabbed and raped the two women. Butz died on the street in front of her home.

Read more
Born To Dance
3:13 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Peter Boal: From Dancer To Mentor

Pacific Northwest Ballet Artistic Director Peter Boal teaching a company class.
Credit Pacific Northwest Ballet/Jerry Davis

When Pacific Northwest Ballet artistic director Peter Boal arrived in Seattle in 2005, he was ready to lead Seattle's premier dance company into the 21st century. It was a challenge that excited him, but becoming the head of his own company meant that Boal had to leave behind his own long and celebrated career with New York City Ballet.

Read more
Justice
2:11 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

An Eye For An Eye: Did It Make The World Blind?

Credit Thane Rosenbaum's book, "Payback."

Steve Scher talks with Thane Rosenbaum, author of "Payback: The Case For Revenge," about how we view the phrase "an eye for an eye" and the role of revenge in our current justice system.

Read more
Gender Equality
11:11 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Jimmy Carter's Call To Action On Women's Rights In Seattle

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter.
Credit KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

David Hyde speaks with former President Jimmy Carter about growing up in Georgia, politics and his new book, "A Call To Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power."

Seattle Comics Author
2:58 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Making A Superhero From Scratch: A Writer’s Origin Story

G. Willow Wilson writes the comic series, Ms. Marvel, featuring Marvel's first Muslim superhero.
Credit Courtesy Photo/Amber French

Marcie Sillman talks with writer G. Willow Wilson about her new Ms. Marvel series featuring a teenage Muslim superhero named Kamala Khan.

G. Willow Wilson’s origin story, in a matter of speaking, started in New Jersey on about 3 acres of land surrounded by old-growth woods, where her parents raised rabbits and chickens and grew corn, blackberries and sweet potatoes.

Read more
Marijuana Legalization
2:07 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

All In The Family: Bringing Cannabis Business To Port Townsend

Flickr Photo/Patrick Nelson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Port Townsend father-son duo, Martin Gay and Dakota Sandoval, eagerly anticipate the fate of their marijuana business as Washington State Liquor Board starts issuing licenses next month.

Gay and Sandoval’s business, Jefferson County Cannabis Company, was among more than 7,000 applications that were submitted in December to legally grow pot in the state.

Read more
Controversial Literature
12:24 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Salman Rushdie And The Heroism Of Ordinary People

Salman Rushdie's new memoir, "Joseph Anton."

It was Valentine’s Day 1989 when Salman Rushdie got a call from a BBC reporter. She asked him how it felt to be sentenced to death by the Ayatollah Khomeini. He thought, “I’m a dead man.”

Starting at the age of 41, Rushdie spent almost 10 years living under the threat of murder because of a book he’d written, "The Satanic Verses."

Read more
Pedestrian Signals
1:13 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Seattle’s Crosswalk ‘Chirps’ Being Killed Off By ‘Rapid Ticks’

The small speakers at certain intersections in Seattle emit a tone to signal when it is safe to cross for the blind or visually impaired.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Of the nearly 1,050 traffic signals in Seattle, about 100 have audible traffic signals. Pedestrians who have gotten used to the chirps and cuckoo sounds are contending with a new tone. So far, multiple people have described the new “rapid ticks” as jarring, according to the Seattle Department of Transportation.

Read more
Politics
3:46 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Susan Hutchison: 'The Republicans Have Been Too Weak For Too Long'

Washington State Republican Party Chair Susan Hutchison.
Courtesy of Susan Hutchison

Ross Reynolds checks in with Washington State Republican Party Chair Susan Hutchison to talk about the state of the GOP in Washington and her plans for leading the party into the future.

Pages