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Birds and Nature
6:00 am
Mon August 26, 2013

What You Didn't Know About Crows, Steve Earle And Patti Smith

Flickr Photo/Lucina M

The Crow: A Common, Uncommon Bird

They’re big, noisy and everywhere. But crows are much more than cackling flocks. They recognize people, they mate for life and they pant like dogs when they’re hot. A commonly seen bird, maybe – but crows are not common in their abilities. Steve Scher talks with John M. Marzluff, professor of Wildlife Science at the University of Washington, and Tony Angell, a freelance artist and writer about their collaborative book, “In the Company of Crows and Ravens” and the wonders of these mysterious birds.

Steve Earle Makes Protest Music With A 21st Century Twang

Musician Steve Earle was raised in Texas. Earle’s music isn’t afraid to take on politics, and it does so with a 21st century attitude. Steve Earle joined us in 2007.

Punk Rock Founder: Patti Smith

Two young twenty-somethings with no money and a lot of ambition moved to New York City. They wanted to be artists, but they weren't sure what kind. She was his muse. He was hers. She was Patti Smith. She went on to become one of the founders of punk rock. He was Robert Mapplethorpe. He became a famous photographer. He died of AIDS in 1989. Patti Smith tells the story of their 20-year relationship in her new book "Just Kids." Steve Scher talked with Patti Smith in 2010.

Sporting Diplomacy
12:45 am
Mon August 26, 2013

For Pakistan And Afghanistan, Soccer As Reconciliation

Afghanistan and Pakistan, countries that have a history of tense relations, played their first soccer match in nearly 40 years when they met Aug. 20 in Kabul. Afghanistan (in red) won 3-0.
Omar Sobhani Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 2:03 am

Afghanistan and Pakistan are better known for their verbal fights and occasional border clashes, but for the first time since 1976, they battled on a soccer field in Kabul.

Some 6,000 rabid Afghan fans cheered on their team, clad in red uniforms. There were horns, flags, and face paint. It looked like any soccer game in the world, except for all the riot police, snipers, and Blackhawk helicopters passing overhead periodically.

Ahmad Mirwais, a 27-year-old tailor, was one of those lucky enough to score a ticket.

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Your Take On The News
1:28 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Ballmer Exits MSFT, Businesses Go Gun-Free, And Russell Wilson Hits GQ

It’s Friday — time to talk over the week’s news with Joni Balter, Eli Sanders and Knute Berger. Steve Ballmer says he's stepping down. What lies ahead for Microsoft? Washington Ceasefire and Mayor Mike McGinn ask Seattle businesses to go gun-free. Will it work? Plus: arena backer Chris Hansen fesses up to an awkward political donation, state Republicans get ready to pick a new party chair and the debate over a $15-an-hour minimum wage picks up steam.

We talk about those stories and more with our panel of journalists. What stories were you following this week? What wasn’t covered enough? What’s your take on the news?

Community Discussions
9:37 am
Fri August 23, 2013

A Place To Talk About Death And Dying, Cake And Tea Served

Death cafes offer an opportunity to ask, how do you want to live your life? How do you want to die?
Flickr Photo/Piermario

Death is one of those subjects considered taboo in polite company. But recently a group of strangers gave up a sunny afternoon to meet in a Seattle coffee shop to talk about just that.

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Amazing Individuals
6:00 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Best Of The Conversation: Feature Interviews

The Nancy Pearl action figure.
KUOW Photo

We talk to a lot of fascinating people on The Conversation: comedians, journalists, politicians, ex-felons, librarians, writers and even pirates. Today, we rebroadcast three interviews with some amazing individuals who have overcome hard times to pursue their dreams.

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Author Event
8:00 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

"Faith And Madness On The Alaska Frontier" With Tom Kizzia

Tom Kizzia's book "Pilgrim's Wilderness."

Alaska journalist Tom Kizzia spent a decade following the Pilgrims, a modern-day Alaska pioneer family. With his wife and fifteen children, Papa Pilgrim masqueraded as a homespun Christian family man. Over time, however, Kizzia reveals that this father was actually a sociopath.

Kizzia spoke at the Elliott Bay Book Company on August 8.

Sex Education
6:00 am
Thu August 22, 2013

Gloria Steinem, Gang Violence And Talking To Kids About Sex

Flickr Photo/Ali Haines

Gloria Steinem: The Next 30 Years

Gloria Steinem, founder of Ms. Magazine, leader of the women’s movement and journalist, visited KUOW in 2006. Steve Scher talked with Steinem about what modern feminism means and her goals for the next 30 years.

Gang Violence In Seattle And Tacoma

In 2006, Seattle and Tacoma saw a sudden surge in gang violence. Rival gangs were battling over street corners and engaging in drive-by shootings. Steve Scher talked with Lt. Eric Sano of the Seattle Police Department, Gabriel Morales who trains law enforcement officials to prevent gang violence, and Dennis Turner, a former gang-member-turned prevention specialist in Pierce County. Steve asks why these gangs were proliferating, what can be do to prevent them and we hear personal stories of gang life.

Talking To Kids About Sex

It may well be the subject every parent dreads: the sex talk. But Amy Lang, founder of Birds + Bees + Kids, is here to make it easier. Marcie Sillman talked with Lang back in 2006 about strategies to talk to kids about sex.

Rockin' Rollin' Seattle
1:00 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Remembering The Beatles Seattle Invasion In The Summer Of '64

Paul McCartney and John Lennon on stage at the Coliseum.
copyright © Timothy Eagan

The first wave of the British Invasion hit the shores of the Pacific Northwest with the arrival of The Beatles on August 21, 1964.

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Remembering The Big Game
12:11 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

1982 Little League Team Brings World Championship To Kirkland

12–year–old Cody Webster, hero of the Kirkland Little League team, and his teammates are cheered by fans in Kirkland, Wash. The team won the world championship by beating Taiwan 6–0 in 1982.
Credit AP Photo

In the summer of 1982, Kirkland, Wash., was a quiet bedroom community. That was, until the local underdog Little League team made it to the World Championship game and became a part of sports history.

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Human Interest
9:36 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Northwest Chimps Compete In National Art Contest

Courtesy of Chimpanzee Sanctuary NW

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 12:30 pm

Two chimpanzees living in the Northwest are competing in a national art contest.  The chimps and their caretakers are trying to win a $10,000 first prize for their respective sanctuaries. 

The abstract artwork entered by Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest in Cle Elum, Washington was created using children's finger paint enhanced with sunflower seed shells. "It's kind of a mixed media piece," says sanctuary outreach director Diana Goodrich. She says the chimp artist is a retired biomedical study subject named Jamie.

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Live Surgery
6:00 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Steve Allen, Live Surgery, And Salman Rushdie

Flickr Photo/Army Medicine

Steve Allen: On Television And Performing

Steve Allen was an American television personality, musician, composer, comedian and writer. He was the first host of “The Tonight Show,” and one New York Times article dubbed him "The Father of All Talk-Show Hosts."  Allen passed away in 2000. Steve Scher talked with Allen in 1993 about television, creativity and making people laugh.

Behind The Scenes: Surgery

As part of Weekday’s How-To series, Steve Scher sat down with two surgeons: Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, chairman of neurological surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and Dr. Eric Froines, then-chief of general surgery at Capitol Hill Specialty Center Group Health Permanente. Scher asked what the life of a surgeon is like and what it feels like to repair human brains, and took a field trip to a live surgery.

Salman Rushdie On Starting The Iraq War

In late 2002, the prospect of a war in Iraq was looming. British-Indian author and essayist Salman Rushdie sat down with Steve Scher. Rushdie discusses his concerns about the potential of a war in Iraq and his thoughts on terrorism.

Imaginary Friends
6:00 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Imaginary Friends, Ruth Reichl, And Robert Olen Butler

Flickr Photo/Jared Eberhardt

Imaginary Friends: Can’t Live With 'Em, Can’t Live Without 'Em

Most of us have fond memories of our childhood friends, but what about our friends that weren’t real? Imaginary friends come in many shapes and sizes, and they often provide handy scapegoats. Steve Scher talked with Marjorie Taylor, professor and head of psychology at the University of Oregon and author of "Imaginary Companions." He also talked to Stephanie Carlson, professor of child development at the University of Minnesota, about where our imaginary friends come from and why they leave.

Ruth Reichl On How And What Americans Eat

At the end of 2009, legendary Gourmet Magazine printed its last issue. Steve Scher talked with then-editor and author Ruth Reichl just four days before the announcement of the magazine’s end about how and what Americans are eating.

Robert Olen Butler On Vietnamese Expat Communities

Robert Olen Butler is the author of “A Good Scent from a Stranger Mountain,” a collection of short stories about Vietnamese expats. In his book, Butler recalls many stories from Vietnamese expats around the world and the often, as he deems them, temperamental dynamics of these communities. Steve Scher talked with Butler back in 1992.

Seattle Music
6:00 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Seattle Rocks: The Conversation Takes A Look At Seattle Music

Rapper Macklemore on tour for his most recent album, "The Heist."
Flickr Photo/thecomeupshow

Seattle music is more than just grunge. The city is the birth place to a diverse scene and an eclectic group of musicians. From jazz to rap to indie to funk, Seattle has nurtured generations of bands and musicians. The Conversation explores the many sounds of the city’s musical history from Seattleite turned rock star, Duff McKagan, to current chart-toppers Macklemore & Ryan Lewis.

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E-Books
11:37 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Is Seattle The Next "New York" In Publishing?

Flickr Photo/Andrew Masson

When it comes to publishing authors’ works, Seattle may be the next New York City. Amazon and other tech companies have transformed publishing with e-readers, social media and new financial models, making the old New York book publishing house less relevant, according to tech reporter Emily Parkhurst.

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Life And Culture
10:00 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Girls Gone Mild, Surfing, And Fantasy Fiction

Cold water and threatening currents don't keep avid surfers away from the waves in the Pacific Northwest.
Flickr Photo/daisydoubleoh

Girls Gone Mild: Demands For Modest Fashion

In 2004, an 11-year-old girl in Redmond wrote a letter to Nordstrom complaining that the choice of clothing available to her was too revealing; midriff shirts, low-riding pants. Today many still worry about the revealing clothing options for young girls. KUOW’s Steve Scher talked with Dr. Pepper Schwartz, professor of sociology at the University of Washington, and Laura Portolese Dias, an instructor of business administration now at Central Washington University, about where these trends come from and where to find modest clothing for children.

Surfing: Pacific Northwest Style

Frankie Avalon surfed in every beach party movie he made while Annette Funicello looked on lovingly. The movie "Blue Crush" profiled a bunch of girls who surfed competitively. Even Elvis surfed in one of his movies. But none of them surfed in the Pacific Northwest, which has the best swells in the world according to a study by legendary explorer Jacques Cousteau. The Pacific Northwest also has notoriously cold water, but that's not the worst of a surfer's worries compared to the strong currents and undertows. Marcie Sillman talked with Bobby Arzadon, owner and founder of the Perfect Wave Shop in Kirkland, and Eric Fleming, then middle school art teacher and longboard surfer, about surfin’ in the PNW.

The Allure Of Fantasy

Authors Terry Brooks and Greg Keyes have sold millions of copies of books. Both writers have legions of fans around the nation and the world, and both are part of a parallel universe of fantasy and science fiction: "Star Wars," "Star Trek," "The Lord of the Rings;" the list could go on and on. In 2004, Steve Scher talked with Brooks and Keyes about writing, working with George Lucas and the lasting allure of fantasy.

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