Arts & Life

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Movie Reviews
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

It's Either Art Or A Fire Hose, And We're Calling It The Latter

James (James Franco) is a retired actor who may or may not be suffering from a degenerative mental illness in Maladies, an art film from New York painter, sculptor and filmmaker Carter.
Tribeca Films

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 3:10 pm

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Movie Interviews
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

From Action Hero To Teenage Nerd, Shailene Woodley Has Range

Shailene Woodley, pictured at this year's Independent Spirit Awards, stars in the forthcoming Divergent, a big-screen adaptation of the first book in Veronica Roth's dystopian trilogy.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 4:45 am

"I'm sorry you have to see my pancake face."

Those are among Shailene Woodley's first words as she opens the door to a suite in the Beverly Wilshire Hotel. She's got a publicists' luncheon later in the day — otherwise, she explains, under absolutely no condition would she have worn makeup for an interview.

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StoryCorps
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Animal Rescuers Create Joy Amid Chaos After Exxon Valdez Spill

Suzanne Bishop (left) and LJ Evans met while volunteering at an animal rescue center in Alaska after the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 9:21 am

It's been 25 years since the Exxon Valdez ran aground off the coast of Alaska, spilling millions of gallons of oil into Prince William Sound.

The impact on wildlife was devastating. Cleanup crews poured into the nearby port town, also called Valdez, where an animal rescue center was set up.

"The chaos is incredibly difficult to describe or even imagine," says LJ Evans, a local resident who volunteered to help. "Somebody came back with the first bird — the reporters were so frantic, somebody got in a fight trying to take a picture of this poor little oiled bird."

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Preoccupation With Safety
7:39 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Kids These Days: Growing Up Too Fast Or Never At All?

Hanna Rosin says when kids do things that feel risky on a playground, it allows them to conquer a fear and gain independence.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 3:20 pm

On the cover of the April issue of The Atlantic there's a picture of a boy who could be 6 or 7. He's looking to the right toward an adult, whose hand he's holding. He's also wearing a helmet and knee pads. And — for further protection — he has a pillow strapped to his torso.

The cover art is for Hanna Rosin's article, "Hey Parents: Leave Those Kids Alone," about the overprotected child.

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Science & Technology
3:20 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Seattle Mini Maker Faire To Showcase Wacky Inventions

Seattle Mini Maker Faire in 2013.
Flickr Photo/majorbonnet (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Christin Boyd, founder and organizer of the Seattle Mini Maker Faire, about the "Maker Movement" and what we can expect to see this weekend at the the third annual event.

The Seattle Mini Maker Faire takes place at the EMP Museum from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on March 22-23.

Author Interview
3:15 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

How Private Funding For Science Is A Dangerous Trend

Philip Mirowski's book, "Science Mart."

David Hyde talks with Philip Mirowski, author of "Science Mart: Privatizing American Science," about why he thinks the move to privately funded science is undermining the quality of the research.

"The types of science that are being done are changing, and the way in which science is being done is changing," Mirowski said. "In fact, the quality of some of the science is being affected by it too."

Java History
3:08 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

How Coffee Sobered Up The Modern World

Mark Pendergrast's book, "Uncommon Grounds."

Ross Reynolds talks with Mark Pendergrast, author of "Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How It Transformed Our World," about early coffee houses and why some leaders wanted to ban the popular caffeinated drink.

Festival Of Colors
1:18 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Holi Festivals To Brighten Spring Around Seattle

Flickr Photo/Rajesh_India (CC BY-NC-ND)

Once upon a time there was a king who thought himself a god. The king’s son did not treat his father like a god. This made the king angry. The angry king persuaded his sister to kill the boy with her fireproof cloak. She put the boy on her lap and sat on a bonfire.

But as the flames roared, the cloak flew off her and covered him. And the king’s sister died, and the boy was saved. And the king who fancied himself a god was killed by a real god.

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Personal Identity
10:21 am
Thu March 20, 2014

‘The Science Of Self’ With Jennifer Ouellette

Jennifer Ouellette's book, "Me, Myself, and Why."

What defines us? What determines our identity?

Jennifer Ouellette explores how eye color, likes and dislikes, and even hatred of cilantro construct our individual identities. She underwent personality tests and genome sequencing to determine the slight variations that set us all apart.

Ouellette is a blogger for "Scientific American" and the author of “Me, Myself, and Why: Searching for the Science of Self.” She spoke at Town Hall on February 25, 2014.

Music Interviews
10:03 am
Thu March 20, 2014

From Preacher To Grass Cutter To Earth-Shaking Soul Singer

St. Paul and The Broken Bones is led by singer Paul Janeway (front).
David McClister Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:08 am

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Performing Arts
9:39 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Why Oscar Wilde Still Works: 'People Will Always Have Secrets!'

Kate Wisniewski, Connor Toms, Emily Grogan, and Kimberly King in Seattle Shakespeare Company’s 2014 production of “The Importance of Being Earnest.”
Credit Courtesy of Seattle Shakespeare Company/John Ulman

Oscar Wilde is one of those people: You've heard of him, even if you've never read his novels or seen one of his plays.

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Northwest Wildlife
4:15 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Conservationists Work To Restore Wolf Population In Western Washington

Gray wolf
Flickr Photo/Bethany Weeks (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde speaks with Jay Kehne of Conservation Northwest about efforts to restore the gray wolf population in the western regions of Washington State.

Higher Education
3:19 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

How To Make A $10K College Degree

Flickr Photo/SalFalko (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with author Anya Kamenetz about her book, "DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education," and her proposal for a bachelor's degree that costs a total of $10,000.

Book Interview
3:08 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

The Science And Art Of Receiving Feedback

Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen's book. "Thanks for The Feedback."

Ross Reynolds speaks with Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen, lecturers on law at Harvard Law School, about their new book, "Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well." In the course of writing their previous best-seller, "Difficult Conversations," Stone and Heen found that getting feedback, at work or at home, often creates the most difficult conversations.

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Mancini Lives!
1:26 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

'Swing Years' Theme Song Explained

The most frequently asked question of The Swing Years and Beyond is “What is your theme?”

Played at the top of each Swing Years show, it’s "Royal Blue" from "The Pink Panther" soundtrack. The film came out in 1963 and the album was released in 1964, featuring lounge and lush instrumentals by Henri Pancini … er, Mancini!

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