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Supporter Chants
3:49 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Keeping It Clean At Seattle Sounders Games

From Emerald City Supporters' Facebook page.

Seattle Sounders soccer fans are loud. The problem is some of their chants using nasty language are leaking into the broadcast booth and over the air during games. We’ll ask  Keith Hodo, co-president of Emerald City Supporters, if they’ll clean it up.

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Water Quality
11:33 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Boat Sewage In The Puget Sound? The Department Of Ecology Says No More

Flickr Photo/JPChamberland

It's not something you want to think about: excrement floating in our lovely oceans. Some boaters release their sewage into the water, but Washington's Department of Ecology is trying to change that. They are drafting a petition to the Environmental Protection Agency to classify the Puget Sound as a "no discharge zone." If approved, it would prohibit boaters from releasing any sewage — treated or untreated — in the Sound. Ross Reynolds talks with Department of Ecology supervisor Mark Henley.

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Employer Reaction
9:38 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Check-Up On Seattle's Mandatory Sick Leave

Flickr Photo/ghindo

It has been one year since the city of Seattle implemented its mandatory sick leave law. The ordinance is meant to establish standards for paid sick days and ensure that employers provide a minimum amount of paid time off for employees. So how is the law working out for employers? The Seattle City Council has commissioned a University of Washington study to evaluate the law.

Jennifer Romich, an associate professor in the school of social work at UW has been leading the research, she just released the results from a series of interviews conducted with 24 employer and spoke with David Hyde about her findings.

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October's GeekGirlCon
9:26 am
Fri September 27, 2013

What Is A Geek Girl?

A cinema event hosted by GeekGirlCon.
Flickr Photo/GeekGirlCon

On October 19, downtown Seattle will be invaded by geek girls. That’s when the 3rd annual GeekGirlCon kicks off at the Washington State Convention Center. Maybe you’re wondering, what exactly is a geek girl?  And why does she need her own convention?

Amy Peloff has the answers.  She’s assistant director of the University of Washington’s comparative history of ideas program. She teaches classes in gender, sexuality and women’s studies.  She told Marcie Sillman that defining geek girls is a bit like defining pornography. You may not be able to pin down the specifics, but you know it when you see it.

PNB Premier
8:46 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Twyla Tharp Creates New Work For Pacific Northwest Ballet

PNB dancers rehearse Twyla Tharp's "Waiting at the Station."
Pacific Northwest Ballet Photo/Lindsay Thomas

Pacific Northwest Ballet's Studio C is a big rehearsal hall, with the same dimensions as the stage at nearby McCaw Hall where PNB performs. Despite its size, on this afternoon the room feels packed to the gills.

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Baseball
3:24 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Jamie Moyer On Getting From Fail To Win

Steve Scher interviews former Mariners pitcher Jamie Moyer.
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

At the time of his last game, Jamie Moyer had the most wins, losses and strikeouts of any active major league pitcher. He'd won a World Series championship with the Philadelphia Phillies in 2008. And at age 49, he became the oldest pitcher to record a win in the history of the majors.

But at age 30, Moyer thought he’d washed up in baseball. He’d been drummed out of two teams, he couldn’t throw a pitch anymore. He was nervous and upset and he wasn’t having any fun.

Then he spent a few days with the late sports psychologist Harvey Dorfman who taught Moyer ideas that he used for the next 20 years of his career. His new book with Larry Platt is “Just Tell Me I Can’t: How Jamie Moyer Defeated the Radar Gun and Defied Time.” He talked with Steve Scher at Safeco Field.

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Pop Culture
12:56 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

The '80s: More Complicated Than They Appear On TV

From "Happy Days" to "That '70s Show," TV writers love to tap into viewer nostalgia. This week ABC premieres "The Goldbergs" about a middle-class family living "in a simpler time called the '80s."

But Princeton University history professor Julian Zelizer says that suburban America during the Reagan years was anything but simple. He talks with David Hyde about the political changes that took place outside the home and continue to shape us today.

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Creative Ways To Use Greens
9:00 am
Thu September 26, 2013

Kale: It's Not Just For Salads Anymore

Sara Dickerman and Marcie Sillman explore Kale juice as a delicious way to consume the tough greens.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

When you think of kale, do you conjure visions of raw greens, a little tough and chewy?  Sometimes they're hard to eat, but you dutifully swallow them down because you know they're good for you.

Actually, foodwriter and former professional chef Sara Dickerman begs to differ. Dickerman says one way to consume your vitamins and enjoy them at the same time is to think outside the box when it comes to healthy foods. Take kale, for example.

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1:00 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

The Invention Of "Jaywalking"

Lead in text: 
The show "99% Invisible" explores how the auto industry promoted the word "jaywalking" in order to shift the blame for traffic accidents on irresponsible pedestrians.
On the streets of early 20th Century America, nothing moved faster than 10 miles per hour. Responsible parents would tell their children, "Go outside, and play in the streets. All day." And then the automobile happened. And then automobiles began killing thousands of children, every year.
Robots In The Military
11:37 am
Wed September 25, 2013

Do We Love Robots Too Much?

Technicians from a Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit use a robot to disarm a mine during a training mission.
Flickr Photo/Marion Doss

You don't have to look further than the film industry to see evidence that humans find robots cute or even lovable (think "WALL-E" or R2D2 from "Star Wars"). That affection for robots is what got University of Washington researcher Julie Carpenter interested in attachment to robots in the battlefield.

Carpenter interviewed an Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit, a group of highly trained soldiers who use robots to disarm explosives. David Hyde talks with Carpenter about her findings and how human-robot attachment could affect battlefield decisions.

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Emerging From Recession
10:56 am
Wed September 25, 2013

Luke Timmerman On Finding Biotech Work

Flickr Photo/World Bank Photo Collection

The biotech industry took a big hit during the recession, and it can still be difficult in this area to find and keep work in that field. But for those looking to enter the industry there are a few things you should keep in mind. Luke Timmerman, the national biotech editor at Xconomy, an online business and technology blog, explains what you should consider before taking a job in biotech and the challenges of the industry.

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Local Nonprofit
5:41 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Seattle Businesswoman Helps Syrian Refugees

Rita Zawaideh brings help to Syrian refugees in Jordan.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

There are now more than two million Syrian refugees and some local nonprofits are working to help them. Rita Zawaideh is a Seattle businesswoman who travels to Jordan every other month to bring refugees medical supplies. She started the nonprofit Salaam Cultural Museum in Seattle in 1996.

She recently returned from one of those trips. She and other volunteers saw thousands of patients and handed out hundreds of pounds of medicine.

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Critic's Choice
4:35 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Fall TV: Three New Shows Worth Checking Out

Showtime's new show "Masters of Sex."
"Masters of Sex'" Facebook page.

Even in the age of Hulu, Netflix and movies on your phone, fall still means new shows on television. IMDb TV editor Melanie McFarland recommends three new shows in the fall schedule worth checking out.

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Album Re-Release
12:17 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Nirvana's "In Utero" Turns 20

Nirvana's album "In Utero."

It’s the 20th anniversary of Nirvana’s final record, "In Utero," released  in September 1993. Kurt Cobain wanted the album to sound less like a pop record so the band brought in producer Steve Albini.

But the record company thought the results were too harsh. Another producer did the final mix. To mark the anniversary, there’s new deluxe edition of the album out that includes the rougher original mixes. Ross Reynolds and music writer Charles Cross discuss the impact and influence of "In Untero."

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International Diplomacy
12:03 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Family Reunion Program Postponed By North Korea

The border fence between North Korea and South Korea in the demilitarized zone.
Flickr Photo/CJ_Supreme

The Korean War ended 60 years ago. It caused many hardships, including the separation of  family members between the North and the South. To this day, there is no official contact between citizens of the two countries. No phone calls. No letters.

But finally in 2000, North and South Korea agreed to hold family reunions. The last one took place in 2010. Another reunion was scheduled to take place today at a North Korean resort, but it was abruptly postponed over the weekend by the North Korean government.

Why did this happen? And what does it mean for diplomacy between the two countries? Charles Armstrong is professor of Korean studies at Columbia University. He talked with Ross Reynolds.

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