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This Not Just In
12:30 am
Fri July 26, 2013

President Harding's Last Public Speech At Husky Stadium

President Warren G. Harding.
Wikipedia

On July 27, 1923, Warren G. Harding spoke at Husky Stadium. It would be the last public speech the president would ever give.

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American History
8:00 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

How Benjamin Franklin Enlightened America With Jonathan Lyons

Founding Father Benjamin Franklin
From Wikipedia.

When Benjamin Franklin (and friends) brought the ideals of the Enlightenment to a nascent United States, he laid the foundation for the political revolution that would follow. Historian Jonathan Lyons spoke about the founding father and the country’s intellectual coming-of-age in this talk recorded at Town Hall on June 27.

Impaired Boating
4:21 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Tougher BUI Laws To Start On Sunday

Officer Sylvester is part of the Harbor Patrol Unit that patrols Lake Union, Lake Washington and the Puget Sound. Starting Sunday, the consequences for drunk boating will increase substantially.
KUOW Photo/Meghan Walker

On the weekends, a lot of boaters hit the water which means a lot of drinking off of dry land. But boating under the influence laws are about to get a lot tougher. This Sunday, a new state law will take effect that will make drunk boating as punishable as drunk driving.

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Spending Wisely
11:31 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Spent The Right Way, Can Money Buy Happiness?

Elizabeth Dunn's book "Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending"

Money may not buy happiness, but can spending your money wisely make you happier? Elizabeth Dunn, a psychology professor at the University of British Columbia, say yes. She talks with Ross Reynolds about the five principles of delightful spending and her new book "Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending."

Pot, Boeing And Art
9:00 am
Thu July 25, 2013

DEA Raids Pot Dispensaries, Art Of Our City, Boeing, Losing Art Collections

Seattle Art Museum's collection is privately owned, unlike the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. But it begs the question: What would Seattle look like without its cultural icons?
Flickr Photo/Alex Abboud and illustration by Kara McDermott

DEA Raids Puget Sound Pot Dispensaries
Federal drug enforcement agents raided marijuana dispensaries around Puget Sound on Wednesday afternoon. We’ll bring you the latest and speak with Alison Holcomb of the ACLU of Washington.

Art Of Our City: Precious Little
What are the limits of language? Sometimes we speak better when we communicate without traditional words or vocabularies. That’s one of the themes of Madeline George’s play “Precious Little.” It opens August 2 at Seattle’s Annex Theater. Director Katherine Karaus and cast members give us a taste of the play and talk about the role of language onstage and in life.

Update On Boeing
Boeing’s profit is up 13 percent, despite the troubles the company has been facing lately. The Boeing 787, 737 and 777 have all been in the headlines for fires and faulty landings. Boeing is looking for fixes to the problems as the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board continue to investigate the Asiana 214 crash in San Francisco, the 787 fire at Heathrow airport and the Southwest crash at LaGuardia. Christopher Drew, the Pentagon and aerospace reporter for the New York Times explains the latest news from Boeing.

What Does It Mean For A City To Lose Its Art Collection?
When the city of Detroit declared bankruptcy last week, creditors began to eye existing assets. One stood out: The art collection at the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. Appraisers put its value at roughly $2.5 billion. But is it that easy to sell off a cultural collection to pay off a city’s debt? And what does it mean to a city to lose that cultural collection? Seattle Art Museum Director Kimerly Rorshach explains some of the intangibles when it comes to valuing art.

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Gender Identity
11:59 am
Wed July 24, 2013

What Does It Mean To Be A Man?

What does it mean to be a woman? What does it mean to be a man? Those are two large questions with no right answers. Ross Reynolds sits down with former chair of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington, David Allen, for a discussion on gender, sexuality, identity and pressure while listeners share their definitions of what it means to be a man.

Yum!
11:42 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Getting Fresh With Ross And Sheryl: Converting Squash Skeptics

Squash the skepticism, squash rules!
Credit Sheryl Wiser

Correction 7/25/2013: Sheryl provided the following correction regarding her friend Zephyr Paquette's summer squash preparation: After grating the squash, add some herbs and salt, and let sit for 10 minutes, not seconds.

Summer squash doesn't necessarily incite delight at first glance but Sheryl Wiser of the Cascade Harvest Coalition joins Ross Reynolds to destroy the myth that squash is merely a vessel for other flavors. We hear squash recipes and find out how to pick the sweetest squash at the farmers markets. Plus! Did you know it is actually a fruit? 

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Famous Duos
10:00 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Canada, Culture, And Commerce

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, Hollywood's most famous dancing duo.
From Wikipedia.


Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Then, film critic Robert Horton looks at some of Hollywood's most famous duos. Finally, Geekwire's Todd Bishop wraps up the news from the world of tech.

Skyrocketing Rent
9:00 am
Wed July 24, 2013

America's Economy, Seattle's Rents, And Nancy Pearl's Picks

Flickr Photo/Rennett Stowe


President Obama On The Economy 
President Obama is at Knox College in Illinois today to deliver the first of six speeches on the country's economy, part of an “economic conversation with Americans” over the next two months. While no new sweeping proposals are expected, the President does hope to gain public support ahead of fiscal deadlines coming in the fall. We talk with Peter Coy of Bloomberg Businessweek about what we can expect to hear.

Nancy Pearl Recommends
Book commentator Nancy Pearl stops by to recommend summer reading. She says readers should check out, "Winner of the National Book Award," by Jincy Willett. Also by Jincy Willett, "Jenny and the Jaws of Life," and "Amy Falls Down." Nancy also recommends "Americanah" by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.   

What's Raising Rents In Seattle?
Seattle has added nearly 2,000 apartments this year, but rents have gone up. The average renter in King and Snohomish counties now pays $1,190 dollars a month, a 5.8 percent increase over the past year. So what’s driving the skyrocketing rent prices? We talk with Glenn Crellin of the University of Washington’s Runstad Center For Real Estate Studies.

Gender Identity
11:52 am
Tue July 23, 2013

What Does It Mean To Be A Woman?

What does it mean to be a woman? What does it mean to be a man? Those are two large questions with no right answers. Ross Reynolds sits down with University of Washington professor Amanda Swarr for a discussion on gender, sexuality, identity and pressure while listeners share their definitions of what it means to be a woman.

Income Mobility
11:43 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Seattleites Have An Easier Time On The Economic Ladder Than Others

It’s much easier to climb the economic ladder in Seattle than other affluent US cities such as Atlanta. That’s according to a new study by Harvard economists. So what makes Seattle a better place to grow up if you’re born into a low-income household? Ross Reynolds talks with co-author of the study, Nathan Hendren. 

The Vitamin Myth
10:00 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Understanding Vitamins, Composer Lawrence Dillion, And Greendays

Flickr Photo/Lindsey Turner

Understanding The Vitamin Myth
There is often contradictory information about the health benefits of vitamins and supplements: take them, don’t take them, low vitamin D is tied to aging, Omega-3 might cause cancer. So how do doctors and nutritionists cipher through the different information to provide the best advice to patients? Dr. Calvin Kwan, clinical resident at Bastyr Center for Natural Health, and Mary Purdy, a registered dietitian with Seattle Healing Arts Center, explain when vitamins are and are not effective.

Composer Lawrence Dillion
The Seattle Chamber Music Society Summer Festival wraps up its 32nd season of performances in Benaroya Hall this week. Since 2007 the Society has premiered new pieces of chamber music through the efforts of its commissioning club. Club members pool together money to support the creation of work by leading American composers. This year’s piece, by composer Lawrence Dillon, premiered at the summer festival in Seattle on July 8. The composition “Sanctuary” is a musical musing for piano, horn and strings on the many meanings of the word. Dillon earned a doctorate in composition  from Juilliard in 1985. He was the youngest composer in the school’s  history ever to do so.  Dillon speaks with KUOW's Dave Beck and we'll hear recorded excerpts  from the premiere of “Sanctuary.”

Greendays Gardening
Our gardening panel includes a flower expert, native plant expert, and vegetable gardening expert. They answer your gardening questions every Tuesday.   

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Seattle Sports
9:00 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Mariner's Mid-Season Report, And Living With Parkinson's

Flickr Photo/David Grant

The M’s Mid-Season Report
Halfway through the major league baseball season, the Seattle Mariners have taken their fans on quite the wild ride. Long losing streaks, winning streaks and a whole bunch of injuries. But recently, there have been some glimmers of hope. Young players like Nick Franklin and Brad Miller have ignited the M’s offense. And Raul Ibanez is on the verge of breaking the record of hitting the most home runs by a 41-year-old. So what’s in store for the M’s the rest of this season? Larry Stone, who covers major league baseball for the Seattle Times, is here to discuss the rest of the season.

Living Well With Parkinson's
Medicine is making great advancements in the fight against Parkinson’s disease, even though there is still no cure. Advancements in gene therapy and a unique brain surgery are extending lives. But, it’s not just technology that’s helping patients, holistic medicine is also playing a role. A leading neurological researcher and one of her patients join us to share their story.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

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Seattle Master Bike Plan
11:20 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Imagining Seattle's Bike Utopia

What does your Seattle bike utopia look like?
Flickr Photo/papahazama

How do you get to work: Do you drive? Do you take the bus? Perhaps you carpool. What would it take to get you to ride a bike to work? Would you ride a bike if there were more trails away from traffic? Perhaps the only thing stopping you from putting the clippy shoe on the pedal is all those pesky inclines. Ross Reynolds hears from listeners about what their bike utopia would look like and checks in with reporter Erica Barnett about what is in the Seattle Master Bike Plan (PDF)

Public Meeting
"Making the Seattle Bicycle Master Plan Work for Your Business," 4:00-6:00 p.m. at the Russell Investment Center (1301 Second Ave, floor 17). Host: Seattle Department of Transportation.

Book Publishing
11:12 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Who, What, When, Where And How To Get Published

Kerry Colburn and Jen Worick, book publishing gurus.
From The Business of Books' Facebook page

Later this week in Seattle, hundreds of authors, agents and publishers will gather as part of the Pacific Northwest Writers Conference and one of the most frequently asked questions will be, how do I get my book published? Ross Reynolds gets advice on what steps to take to get your book published from publishing consultants, authors and all around entertaining human beings Jen Worick and Kerry Colburn. They also blog at The Business of Books.

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