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Estate Planning
12:21 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Why You Need A Will

Twitter Photo

You might not think you need a will or estate plan, but consider that chaos that follows when there isn’t one. We’ll ask estate planner and attorney Tim Burkart questions about taking care of your final arrangements. Ross Reynolds also takes questions from callers.

Tribal Buy-Back
12:17 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Controversial US Government Plan To Buy Back Tribal Land

Flickr Photo/indigenous1

The US government is trying to make amends for historical mismanagement of tribal land by buying back land for tribal governments. It plans to spend $1.9 billion for 10 million acres of land by 2022. Ross Reynolds talks to Gabriel Galanda, a Seattle lawyer and a member of the Round Valley Indian Tribes of Mendocino County, California, about the program and what it could mean for Native Americans.

Jazz Legend
10:19 am
Mon August 5, 2013

The Pizzarelli Patriarch Still Swings At 87

Jazz musician Bucky Pizzarelli.
Flickr Photo/Eduardo Loureiro

Bucky Pizzarelli is the patriarch of one of America’s great jazz families.  His talented offspring include guitarist and singer John Pizzarelli and bassist Martin Pizzarelli.  The Pizzarellis often perform standards from the Great American Songbook together at jazz clubs and music festivals around the world. 

Prior to a weekend of performances with the family band at Jazz Alley in Seattle last weekend, Bucky Pizzarelli brought in his signature seven-string guitar and played live music in the KUOW Performance Studio.

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Book Recommendations
10:00 am
Mon August 5, 2013

News From D.C., And Nancy Pearl

Librarian Nancy Pearl action figure.
KUOW Photo

News From D.C.
Washington, D.C., is on recess. What didn’t get done before they left? CBS News Capitol Hill producer Jill Jackson.

Nancy Pearl On Armchair Travel
If you don’t have the time or money to travel this summer, you can still get away.  Nancy Pearl takes us on an armchair travel adventure with her recommendations of worldly books to read this summer.  Two titles she loves: “The Saddest Pleasure” by Moritz Thomsen and “Travels in a Thin Country” by Sara Wheeler.

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Literary History
9:42 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Former Steinbeck Boat Waits In Port Townsend Dry-Dock Limbo

Anne Shaffer Coastal Watershed Institute

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 4:39 pm


The Port of Port Townsend, Wash., is providing a temporary home to a piece of literary history. But the dry-docked sardine fishing boat once chartered by the writer John Steinbeck faces an uncertain fate. 


The 76-foot boat's original name was the Western Flyer. In 1940, John Steinbeck and marine biologist Ed Ricketts (who later inspired the character Doc in "Cannery Row") chartered the wood vessel for a cruise around Baja California.

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Ask Your Housing Questions
9:00 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Clint Dempsey, Diplomatic Relations Between Russia And US, And Housing Questions Answered

Clint Dempsey Joins The Sounders
Fans of Seattle soccer were treated to a welcome surprise at the start of Saturday's game against Dallas. Clint Dempsey, captain of the US Men's National Team and player for Tottenham in England announced he would be joining the Seattle Sounders. We talk with Steve Clare, president of the North American Soccer Reporters and editor of Prost Amerika Soccer about what this means for the MLS and the Sounders.

Understanding US-Russian Relations
The diplomatic relationship between Russia and the United States was strained long before President Vladimir Putin granted a one year asylum to NSA whistle blower Edward Snowden. Dr. Stephen Cohen, professor emeritus of Russian studies at New York University, explains the long history and current conflict between the two nations.

Your Housing Questions Answered
Puget Sound housing prices are on the rise. Mortgage rates continue to be historically low. What does that mean when it comes to your living situation. Should you buy a house? Should you sell your house? Should you refinance? When is it wiser to stay renting? Two housing experts are on hand to answer your specific questions.  Call us at 206.543.5869 or 1.800.289.5869.

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The Two-Way
4:14 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Baseball Suspends Alex Rodriguez For 211 Games

He's waiting to hear his fate: New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez.
John Angelillo UPI /Landov

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 3:49 pm

(We most recently updated this post at 6:48 p.m. ET.)

New York Yankees' slugger Alex Rodriguez, one of baseball's brightest stars and its highest-paid player, will be suspended through the 2014 regular season because he violated parts of baseball's Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program, the league said today.

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Culture
12:01 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Le Shocking: France Is One Of The Most Productive Countries In The World

Just look at this productive Parisian. He is probably getting off work early, he was so productive.
Flickr Photo/Darcy Moore

A recent study found that even though the French work 16 percent fewer hours than the rest of the world, they can still afford a high standard of living. So what pays for all that bread, cheese and wine? Increased productivity in the workplace.

Ross Reynolds talks to economist Dean Baker about what makes France one of the most productive countries in the world.

RadioActive Youth Media
11:41 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Is Your Family Growing Mold?

Amina Ibrahim has four siblings, while her co-host Rachel Lam has two.
KUOW Photo/Lila Kitaeff

Siblings: the most common adversaries since the beginning of time. From Cain and Abel all the way up to today's hosts, Rachel Lam and Amina Ibrahim, and their siblings. Bickering is a skill perfected in the sister-brother business, yet underneath all the fighting is a permanent foundation of love.

Rachel and Amina explore complicated sibling dynamics through the streets of Fremont, their own sisters and brothers, and fellow RadioActivian Maddie Ewbank's young cousins.

Warning: this podcast may dredge up half-buried battles and prickly memories.

News And Analysis
10:00 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Your Take On The News

It's Friday: time to talk over the week's news with Seattle Times assistant political editor Joni Balter, Crosscut writer Knute Berger and Q13 Fox political analyst C.R. Douglas.

Primary election ballots are due on Tuesday. We'll tackle the very latest in the mayor's race as the candidates head towards the homestretch. Kirby Wilbur stepped down this week as chair of the Washington State Republican Party. Who's in line to take the job? What stories caught your attention? Share your thoughts by writing to Weekday.

Creative Leftovers
9:00 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Biotech News, And What's In The Fridge?

The Chef in the Hat and KUOW foodie Ruby de Luna share a laugh.
KUOW Photo/Carmen Santos

Biotech News
What's happening in the world of biotech? Journalist Luke Timmerman from Xconomy tells us about the region’s big stories.

What’s In The Fridge?
“The Chef in the Hat” Thierry Rautureau joins us to make new recipes from the leftovers in your fridge. Have a look inside and tell us what ingredients you have. We'll help you make a delicious dinner without a trip to the store. Call us at 800.289.5869 or email Weekday.  

Weekend Weather Forecast
State climatologist Nick Bond gives us a weather forecast for the weekend.

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Obituary
6:04 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Toby Saks, Founder Of Seattle Chamber Music Society, Dead At 71

The Seattle classical music community lost one of its most respected leaders Thursday. Toby Saks was a cellist, music professor at the University of Washington and the founder of the Seattle Chamber Music Society. Her death at age 71 from pancreatic cancer came just after the completion of the annual summer festival that she has overseen for more than 30 years.

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Eating Off The Land
4:57 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Urban Food Foraging Goes Mainstream In Seattle

Melany Vorass Herrera harvests stinging nettles from Seattle's Golden Gardens Park. It's technically illegal, but like many other cities, Seattle is starting to promote careful urban foraging.
KUOW

Urban Foraging Goes Mainstream In Seattle

Cities like Seattle are really good at certain things. Like making widgets and designing spacecraft. Activities that take up a lot of space, like farming, are left to the farmers. For the most part, our food is trucked in from the Skagit Valley, shipped in from Florida, flown in from Chile -- places where land and labor are cheaper. But that divorce – between cities and farms – leaves cities vulnerable. All that movement of food between cities and farms relies on infrastructure. And infrastructure can fail, sometimes catastrophically.

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Musical Invention
1:44 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

A Symphony Of Sirens

Avraamov conducting the "Symphony of Sirens" in Moscow, November 7, 1923.
Andrey Smirnov, courtesy of PRX

What is the sound of Seattle? Metro buses? Drum circles? Every city has distinctive sounds, and collectively, they form a kind of soundtrack beneath the "movie" of your life.

Arseny Avraamov was interested in the sounds of his hometown Moscow. He thought of those sounds as instruments, and he used those instruments to conduct a live symphony called “The Symphony of Sirens.

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, August 1:

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Behind The Scenes
12:49 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Seattle Opera Creates Backstage Magic For "Ring Cycle"

Seattle Opera technical director Robert Schaub is the backstage mastermind behind staging the epic "Ring Cycle."
Credit KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

If a Hollywood filmmaker decided to make a movie version of composer Richard Wagner's epic "Ring Cycle," he would probably have the latest computer wizardry at his fingertips. But the "Ring" is performed live onstage, featuring more than 15 hours of music spread out over four nights of opera.

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