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International Diplomacy
12:03 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Family Reunion Program Postponed By North Korea

The border fence between North Korea and South Korea in the demilitarized zone.
Flickr Photo/CJ_Supreme

The Korean War ended 60 years ago. It caused many hardships, including the separation of  family members between the North and the South. To this day, there is no official contact between citizens of the two countries. No phone calls. No letters.

But finally in 2000, North and South Korea agreed to hold family reunions. The last one took place in 2010. Another reunion was scheduled to take place today at a North Korean resort, but it was abruptly postponed over the weekend by the North Korean government.

Why did this happen? And what does it mean for diplomacy between the two countries? Charles Armstrong is professor of Korean studies at Columbia University. He talked with Ross Reynolds.

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Career Advice
11:35 am
Tue September 24, 2013

How To Get A Raise

Flickr Photo/401 (K) 2013

Referred to as one of the most awkward conversations outside of a first date, asking for a raise is no walk in the park. There's an art to it. And in this economic climate where rent is skyrocketing and wages are stagnating, knowing how to ask for more money is a good skill to have. President of Career-Horizons, Matt Youngquist, teaches Ross Reynolds the art of salary negotiation.

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Diner en Blanc
12:59 am
Tue September 24, 2013

This Elegant, Whimsical Pop-Up Dinner Party Had 4,000 Guests

At Diner en Blanc ("Dinner in White"), people arrive dressed all in white. They bring their own food and, fittingly,” white wine.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 8:15 am

On a gorgeous night, some 4,000 people, dressed all in white, have come to dine in a public, yet secret place in New York's Bryant Park.

They have come for Diner en Blanc, an unusual pop-up event that takes place in 20 countries. The guests eat in splendor at a location they only learn about minutes before they arrive. The thousands wave white napkins to signal the beginning of the event.

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Farming Seafood
2:25 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Raising Tastier Sea Urchins For Foodies And The Environment

Sea urchins are considered a culinary delicacy, but supply can't keep up with demand.
Aizat Faiz Flickr

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 4:09 pm

Sea urchins are considered a culinary delicacy in many parts of the world, including Japan and the United States. The market for this "foie gras of the sea" is growing rapidly — so fast that supply can't keep up with demand.

But a scientist in Birmingham, Ala., says he's found a solution: He's built a sea urchin farm in his lab and has even developed a food for them to make them taste better. Now, he wants to take his tasty urchins out of his farm and into restaurants across the country.

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Nightlife Advocate
1:05 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Dave Meinert On Seattle's Changing Nightlife Scene

Credit Flickr Photo/Michael Holden

Dave Meinert manages bands like the Hey Marseilles and the Lumineers. He’s involved with the 5 Point Café, and he started Seattle’s other big music festival: the Capitol Hill Block Party. He's also been a driving political force for the last few decades, helping shape the culture and nightlife of this city.

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Sound of the Day
11:26 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Sounds Of The Day, 9.16.13 - 9.20.13

Riders at the Fiestas Patrias in South Park in 2008.
Flickr Photo/amdogirl56

Each day on The Record we play the sound of your day. Listeners record 30 seconds of a sound they find interesting, write a short story and send it to The Record.

Monday, September 16


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Religion and Mental Health
3:06 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Public Safety, Pope's Call For Balance, And Other Stories Of The Week

Pope Francis is Brazil in July.
Flickr Photo/Semilla Luz

It’s Friday — time to talk over the week’s news with Joni Balter of the Seattle Times, Crosscut's Knute Berger and Eli Sanders of The Stranger. 

A shooting at the Navy Yard in DC and a fatal stabbing in Seattle's Pioneer Square again raise questions about public safety and mental health care. Seattle's race for mayor sees a new round of polling and endorsements. Plus, Pope Francis says Catholics need to find "a new balance" on issues like abortion and homosexuality.  What stories were you following this week?

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Author Interview
11:26 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Jonathan Lethem's "Dissident Gardens"

Jonathan Lethem's book "Dissident Gardens."

Jonathan Lethem is one of America’s finest novelists. His critically acclaimed books include "Motherless Brooklyn," which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction, "Fortress of Solitude" and “Chronic City."

Lethem’s nonfiction work includes a long interview with Bob Dylan and a marvelous profile of James Brown, both for Rolling Stone magazine. Lethem’s latest novel "Dissident Gardens" is about American Communists and leftists. 

The human impulse to throw yourself into history with an attitude that it could matter, that you can change things and that you'll sacrifice for this, is very universal. It's an impulse that becomes misused or betrayed or conflicted in so many different ways, and this book becomes a catalog of all those different kinds of disappointment. — Lethem

Ross Reynolds talks to Lethem about his latest novel, writing, politics and music.

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Tech Industry
1:00 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Seattle Is The Wild West Of Game Design

A sculpture inside DigiPen beckoning viewers to the interactive media industry.
KUOW Photo/Jamala Henderson

One reason the Puget Sound region stayed stronger than some surrounding areas during the economic downturn is because of its tech industry. A particular bright spot is the computer gaming and interactive media industry.

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Food's Future
8:00 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

The Future Of Food With Vandana Shiva

Flickr Photo/Elevate Festival

What is the future of food? How can it sustain us? Vandana Shiva is an environmental and anti-globalization activist. Throughout her career, she’s fought for changes in agriculture practices, among other causes. Her latest book is called “Making Peace with the Earth.” She spoke at Town Hall on September 12, 2013, in a talk sponsored by YES! Magazine.

Seattle Sounders FC
2:20 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Kasey Keller Talks Sounders Past And Future

Former Seattle Sounders FC goalie turned broadcaster Kasey Keller.
Flickr Photo/Noelle Noble

Those who have been following the US and Seattle soccer scene for a while are familiar with Olympia-born Kasey Keller. He has been to the World Cup four times as a goalkeeper for the United States Men's National Team and played extensively in international leagues.

Back in 2008, Keller returned to where he started to play for the Seattle Sounders. He is now one of the voices of the Sounders, announcing games with Ross Fletcher. Keller joins us to talk soccer and the Sounders' performance this year.

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Recession Recovery
2:04 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

"Statistically Insignificant" Wage And Poverty Numbers Tell A Larger Story

A view of Smith Tower from Yesler Terrace, circa 1960.
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives

The US Census Bureau released numbers this week looking at poverty rates and wages across the US in 2012. Our local numbers reflect what’s happening around the country: the number of people living in poverty has stagnated and wages have stayed about the same.

At first glance, this may seem like good news, or even non-news. But the census numbers reveal a larger picture of what’s happening in the wake of the recession: that people in low and middle income brackets aren’t really experiencing a recovery.

Jennifer Romich is the director of the West Coast Poverty Center and an associate professor at the UW School of Social Work. She told KUOW's Marcie Sillman the "statistically insignificant" numbers from the Census Bureau paint a concerning picture of many people that are unable to get ahead financially.

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Business Of Sports
11:12 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Seattle Mariners Owner Dies, Could The Team Be Sold?

Mariners' majority owner Hiroshi Yamauchi.
AP Photo/Katsumi Kasahara

The majority owner of the Seattle Mariners, Hiroshi Yamauchi has died in Japan at the age of 85. The former Nintendo President never watched a Mariners game in person, but he’s credited by many for saving baseball in Seattle when he purchased the team in 1992.

What’s his legacy? And what does his death mean for the Mariners organization moving forward? Geoff Baker covers the Mariners for The Seattle Times. He talked with Marcie Sillman.

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Violence In Gaming
10:36 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Does The Gaming World Welcome Women?

A contestant at Paris Games Week 2012.
Flickr Photo/James Cao

One of the most successful video games in history, Grand Theft Auto, released their latest version on Tuesday. It made $800 million in 24 hours. Grand Theft Auto is known for heavy violence, drugs and sex - beating up women prostitutes is regular part of the game. And this latest release, Grand Theft Auto V, is just as raunchy as expected. But this time, some female gamers aren't buying. Jezebel's night editor, Laura Beck, is one of them. Ross Reynolds talks with Beck about why she won't play Grand Theft Auto V.

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Gaming
10:24 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Grand Theft Auto V: The Last Big Console Release?

Credit Rock Star Games/Grand Theft Auto

Grand Theft Auto released its latest version on Tuesday. It made $800 million in one day. But even though this release is causing a frenzy, console games are facing tough times. The rise of tablet and mobile gaming has brought fierce competition. Ross Reynolds talks with Bloomberg Businessweek writer, Joshua Brustein about the future of console gaming.

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