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Internet Security
2:51 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

What To Do Now That The Heartbleed Bug Exposed The Internet

The Heartbleed bug has exposed up to two-thirds of the Internet to a security vulnerability.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:27 am

With a name like Heartbleed, it's no surprise it's bad. A vulnerability in OpenSSL — the Internet's most commonly used cryptographic library — has been bleeding out information, 64 kilobytes at a time, since March 2012.

"I would classify it as possibly the top bug that has hit the Internet that I've encountered, because of it being so widespread, because it's so hard to detect," says Andy Grant, a security analyst at iSEC Partners.

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Justice
2:11 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

An Eye For An Eye: Did It Make The World Blind?

Credit Thane Rosenbaum's book, "Payback."

Steve Scher talks with Thane Rosenbaum, author of "Payback: The Case For Revenge," about how we view the phrase "an eye for an eye" and the role of revenge in our current justice system.

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Alcohol Branding
12:57 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Pop Stars Are Sippin' On Patron, And Teens Are Bingeing

Singer Ke$ha performs during the iHeartRadio Music Festival at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas in September.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 10:57 am

Ke$ha says that to start the day she'll brush her teeth with a bottle of Jack Daniel's whiskey. Nicki Minaj likes to "have a drink, have a clink" of Bud Light. And the party-rockin' hip-hop duo LMFAO like Ciroc, and they love Patron. "Shots, shots, shots, shots everybody!"

All that name-checking of alcohol brands encourages teens to drink, researchers say. Adolescents who liked songs like these were three times as likely to drink, and were twice as likely to binge than their peers who didn't like those songs.

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Membership Controversy
10:09 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Boy Scouts Of America's Policy On Gay Troop Members And Leaders

Credit Flickr Photo/torbakhopper (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Richard Ellis, the author of "Judging the Boy Scouts of America," about how and why the Boy Scouts of America developed its current policies on gay troop members and gay troop leaders.

Opera History
9:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Denied A Stage, She Sang For A Nation

Contralto Marian Anderson sang at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, April 9, 1939, to an estimated crowd of 75,000 people.
University of Pennsylvania

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 11:08 am

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Book Reviews
9:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

'Astonish Me' Is An Artful, Elegant Dance

Maggie Shipstead is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and the author of Seating Arrangements.
Alisha & Brook

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 6:46 am

"Etonnez-moi," Sergei Diaghilev, the founder of the Ballets Russes, used to say to his dancers. Astonish me. Maggie Shipstead's book of the same name does not astonish; rather, it charms. It is full of the kind of prose you want to curl up and nest in like a cat: seamless and full of small elegances.

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Good Reads
9:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Book News: Archie Comics Is Going To Kill Off Archie

Say It Ain't So: Archie Andrews meets his maker in Archie Comics' upcoming issue of Life with Archie.
AP

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:18 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Recipes
9:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Some Appetizing Nibbles For Pre-Seder Snacking

A spread of Passover snacks
Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 11:38 am

The Passover Seder is usually described as a ceremonial meal: Participants sit down to a set of ritualized foods and tell the story of the exodus from Egypt. But more than just tell it, Jews are bidden to relive it. We engage in ritual and discussion and debate, until each of us feels that we've made a journey ourselves. It's a singular, time-stopping evening. But it can take a very long time.

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Poetry
9:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Kima Jones, On Black Bodies And Being A Black Woman Who Writes

Kima Jones
Courtesy of Kima Jones

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 8:25 am

April is National Poetry Month — and at Code Switch, we like poems. We will be exploring a set of broad issues of race and ethnicity in modern poetry for the duration of the month.

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Heads Or Tales
8:29 am
Wed April 9, 2014

My Kingdom For A Horse-Head Squirrel Feeder

A squirrel partakes of a snack from the horse head feeder
Credit Archie McPhee

Seattle-based company Archie McPhee is getting national attention for putting a horse head on a squirrel.

To clarify, the company is selling a squirrel feeder shaped like a hollow horse head. You put the food up inside it and wait for a curious squirrel to stick its head in with hilarious consequences.

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Business And Housing
7:27 am
Wed April 9, 2014

The Ultimate Reuse: Shipping Containers For Buildings

Starbucks has been rolling out drive-through, walk-up locations made out of recycled shipping containers. This location is in Tukwila, Washington.
Flickr Photo/vmax137 (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The cost of housing in the city is making many people think small, to embrace the micro movement that loves to reuse and recycle. Enter the idea of a shipping container as a building — a natural in a port city like Seattle, which handles 1.6 million container units in a year.

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True Crime
3:04 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

How A Phony Rockefeller Fooled Walter Kirn

Credit Walter Kirn's book, "Blood Will Out."

Ross Reynolds speaks with novelist Walter Kirn, perhaps best known for book, “Up in the Air."

Kirn’s latest work reads like fiction, but it’s not. “Blood Will Out: The True Story of a Murder, a Mystery, and a Masquerade” is about Kirn's association with a man who called himself Clark Rockefeller and claimed to be a member of the Rockefeller family — one of the most powerful families in American history.

It turns out, Clark Rockefeller was not a Rockefeller nor an American. He was a murderer.

Rwanda Genocide
1:28 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Remembering Rwandans Who Followed Their Conscience

Godleaves Mukamunana, left, hid Domitil Mukakumuranga, in her house for weeks so that Hutu militias wouldn't kill her. "Seeing her alive is the best thing," Mukamunana says. "That kind of relationship we have is priceless. The fact that I don't have more like her --€” those who were killed — that's what's hurting."
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 2:24 am

Olive Mukankusi lives in a two-room house with mud walls and a dirt floor in a village called Igati, in eastern Rwanda's Rwamagana province. To get there, you have to drive about 30 minutes down a dirt road.

It's there, in her home, on a warm and sunny afternoon, that she tells a story that she's only told three times in 20 years: first to a local judge, then to an American genocide researcher — and now.

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Security Issues
1:19 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

The Security Bug That Affects Most Of The Internet, Explained

A screen grab from a Heartbleed test Tuesday morning showed Yahoo was vulnerable. The company has since fixed the vulnerability.
filippo.io/Heartbleed screengrab

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 2:45 pm

Editor's Note: A very serious bug with a scary name, Heartbleed, was discovered and disclosed this week. The bug affects OpenSSL, a popular cryptographic library that is used to secure a huge chunk of the Internet's traffic. Even if you have never heard of OpenSSL, chances are, it's helped secure your data in some way.

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Poetry
10:02 am
Tue April 8, 2014

A Poet's Response To World War I Facial Injury And Reconstruction

Ann Gerike's new book is part poetry collection, part medical history.
Credit Floating Bridge Press

Poet Ann Gerike combined years of research with an empathetic imagination to write "About Face: World War I Facial Injury and Reconstruction." Her poems bring to life the stories of terribly disfigured soldiers and surgeon Major Harold Gillies, whose wartime innovations helped restore their faces.

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