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Futebol
6:01 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Time For Kickoff: World's Attention Focused On World Cup

They are feeling it: Children kick around a soccer ball outside the Independencia Stadium in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on Wednesday.
Victor R. Caivano AP

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:41 pm

Update at 4:31 p.m. ET

And Brazil does recover, with a goal from star Neymar a few minutes later.

Update at 4:28 p.m. ET

The beautiful game is not so beautiful for Brazil in the early moments of the game: Croatia is ahead 1-0 after an own goal by the home team. It's early, though. Plenty of time for Brazil to recover.

[A tweet from NPR's Russell Lewis in Sao Paulo.]

Update at 10:25 a.m. ET

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Social Norms
3:13 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Washington Labeled Third 'Loosest' State In Union, Socially Speaking

How do you handle sneezing in public? That might determine the relative "tightness" of your state.
Flickr Photo/Jeff Werner (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with University of Maryland doctoral student and National Science Foundation research fellow Jesse Harrington about a new report analyzing the "tightness" and "looseness" of American states in regards to social norms such as sneezing and talking in public places.

RadioActive Youth Media
1:11 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

How Karate Helped Local Sensei Escape Abuse

Sensei Joni Sharrah at USA Karate, the dojo she founded in Shoreline.
Credit Courtesy of Joni Sharrah

Joni Sharrah runs a dojo in Shoreline, north of Seattle. A teacher for 30 years, she knows that karate transcends punching and kicking. That's because experience has taught her that karate can save a person’s life – physically and emotionally.

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Rebuilding A Life
10:01 am
Wed June 11, 2014

How To Survive, And Thrive, After 5 Years As A Hostage

Joe Cicippio was held in chains at 20 different locations in Lebanon. Some hostages have had trouble readjusting following their release. He says he focused on the good things in his life, including music, to get him through his captivity.
Greg Myre NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 12:57 pm

Joe Cicippio was held hostage by the Islamic group Hezbollah in Lebanon for five years, often chained to a radiator in a room with blacked-out windows, cut off entirely from the outside world. Within weeks of his release in 1991, he asked if he could go back to his old job as the comptroller at the American University of Beirut.

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Author Interview
3:15 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

'Big Little Man': Alex Tizon On Growing Up Asian-American In Seattle

Credit Alex Tizon's book "Big Little Man."

Marcie Sillman talks to journalist and author Alex Tizon about his memoir about coming of age as an Asian-American in Seattle and his search for self.

Crime Data
3:15 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Criminologist Says Murder Is Down, 'Only Thing Up Is Fear And Publicity'

Flowers are placed near a Seattle Pacific University sign following a shooting on campus last Thursday.
Credit KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marcie Sillman talks with Northeastern University criminologist James Alan Fox about crime data and why we are so quick to search for a trend in the midst of tragedy.

Trauma Coverage
2:19 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

How The Media Can Help Prevent Mass Shootings

Flickr Photo/Travis S.

Forensic psychologist Dr. Park Dietz worries the media has encouraged copycats of mass shootings. Recently, there have been two college shootings in as many weeks.

“The longer we continue the coverage, the more colorful, emotionally-arousing and biographical about the shooter that coverage is, the more imitators we’ll attract,” Dietz told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on The Record. Sillman spoke with Dietz on Friday, the day after a shooting at Seattle Pacific University left one dead and three wounded.

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Poetry
1:24 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Poet Christine Deavel On Being 'In Your Care'

Poet Christine Deavel
Credit Rebecca Hoogs

Poet Christine Deavel trains her empathetic eye on two familiar places: North Seattle's Thornton Creek ("In Your Care") and the grocery store checkout line ("Each Day on the Verge").  

As she transforms these places through unexpected language and imagery, she also holds open questions about what it means to be whole, to be a neighbor, to be in one another's care. 

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Foodie Culture
3:12 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

The Tastemakers: Why Some Foods Trend And Others Don't

Credit David Sax' book "Tastemakers."

Marcie Sillman talks with food writer David Sax about the evolution of food trends in North America. Sax has written the book, "The Tastemakers: Why We're Crazy for Cupcakes but Fed Up with Fondue," which answers such questions as: Why are kale salads on every restaurant menu? And why has bacon moved from a breakfast item to become part of every meal, even dessert?

Adoption
12:43 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Rep. Orwall Talks Expanded Birth Record Access For Washington Adoptees

Des Moines Representative Tina Orwall helped craft the new law that allows all Washington State adoptees access to their original birth records.

Knowing your medical history and where your parents are from are things you might take for granted – unless you are adopted.

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Code Switch
10:17 am
Mon June 9, 2014

What Is Your Race? For Millions Of Americans, A Shifting Answer

The race question on the census is constantly changing.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 4:22 pm

This post has been updated.

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Crisis Response
2:19 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

What Is The Best Action In The Face Of A Shooter?

Marcie Sillman talks to Greg Crane, president and founder of ALICE: Alert Lockdown Inform Counter Evacuate. He explains what he believes are the best practices are for responding to an active shooting situation.

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Author Interview
11:43 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Ms. Warren Goes to Washington: A Progressive Senator’s Life Story

Senator Elizabeth Warren.
Flickr Photo/Senate Democrats (CC-BY-NC-ND)

This week on Speakers Forum, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren tells the story of her life and her vision of a progressive America. Warren is known as an advocate for consumer protection. She was largely responsible for the hard-won establishment of the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

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Journalism
3:29 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

The Gutsy, Glamorous 'Dames Of D-Day'

Martha Gellhorn and her husband, far right, Ernest Hemingway. Gellhorn left to cover the Spanish civil war in the 1930s when she was 21. Although she wasn't allowed to cover D-Day, she smuggled herself onto a hospital ship.
Credit Credit Wikimedia Commons

When the Americans entered World War II in 1944, reporters joined their ranks. Women, however, were not allowed.

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New Yorker Cartoonist
3:28 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Roz Chast On Caring For Her Elderly Parents: 'Spoiler Alert! They Die'

Credit Roz Chast's book "Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?"

Marcie Sillman speaks with Roz Chast, a featured cartoonist in the New Yorker, about her latest work of art is about taking care of her very elderly parents.

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