Arts & Life

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Author Interview
2:12 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

The Norwegian Author You Might Start Hearing More About

Credit Jo Nesbo's book, "Police."

Marcie Sillman interviews Norwegian author Jo Nesbo about the newest book in his crime series about the character Harry Hole called, "Police." It has just been published in English and one of his earlier books is being adapted for film.

This interview originally aired on November 7, 2013.

Operatic Firsts
1:45 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Two Leads, Two Deaths In 18 Hours

Kristine Opolais made her Madama Butterfly debut as Cio-Cio-San, only to get a last-minute call to play Mimi in La Boheme.
Marty Sohl Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

Over the weekend, soprano Kristine Opolais sang her heart out — and died twice.

Friday evening she had sung the lead in Puccini's Madama Butterfly. It was her debut in that role at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. It was a big deal. Opolais was so excited about it that she stayed up until five the next morning.

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Traveling With Ivory
1:44 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Musicians, Take Note: Your Instrument May Be Contraband

Antique bows were often made with a small piece of ivory that clamps the bow hairs onto the wood.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

New Obama administration rules aimed at protecting African elephants are causing widespread anxiety in the music world. From country to classical, working musicians say the policy will make them think twice about touring abroad.

The proposed regulations would place a near-total ban on anything made with ivory moving in and out of the U.S.

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Layers Of Meaning
1:03 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

In New Exhibit, Running Shoes Are Potent Symbol Of Boston Bombing

A pair of running shoes left at the Boston Marathon memorial last year.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

In the wake of most tragedies, makeshift memorials fill up with flowers and teddy bears. After the Boston Marathon bombings last April, running shoes became potent symbols in the vast memorial there.

Now, after months in storage at the cavernous City Archives, a group of objects left at the site are in a new exhibition at the Boston Public Library.

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Comforting Traditions
7:25 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Funeral Dinners Help Darrington Cope With Losses

Darrington Community Center hosted a meal for librarian Linda McPherson as part of the community's long-running tradition.
Credit KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The first wave of memorial services honoring the victims who perished in the Oso landslide took place this weekend.

In Darrington, residents gathered to remember Linda McPherson, a longtime resident and librarian. After the service, the community gathered for a meal together. It's a special tradition that goes back many decades in this small community.

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The Week In Review
4:02 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Slow SPD Reform, Health Care Milestone, And The Mariners Start Strong

The Seattle Mariners kicked off their season on March 31.
Credit Flickr Photo/Dinur Blum (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher recaps the news of the week with Knute Berger of Crosscut and Seattle Magazine, political analyst C.R. Douglas for Q13 Fox News and associate editor Eli Sanders of The Stranger.

Bloopers
3:43 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Whoops! Getting It Wrong On 'The Record'

KUOW's Steve Scher and Marcie Sillman have some fun while pitching on Friday.
Credit KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

As KUOW wraps up another successful spring pledge drive, we take a moment to reflect on our not-so-finest moments of public radio — it's The Record's blooper reel.

History
3:10 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Gary Heyde On Martin Luther King Jr.'s Assassination

Martin Luther King Jr.
Credit Flickr Photo/Digital Collections, UIC Library (CC BY-NC-ND)

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated 46 years ago today — on April 4, 1968. Former Seattle teacher and novelist Gary Heyde remembers that day well. It was the day he learned one of the most important lessons of his life, but he almost didn't survive to apply the lesson.

This archive originally aired in October 2011.

Baseball Books
2:54 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Nancy Pearl: Swing And A Hit

Credit Flickr Photo/Mike Rastiello (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with librarian Nancy Pearl about just a few of the many baseball books available, just in time for Tuesday's Opening Night at Safeco Field.

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Space Exploration
2:49 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Mars, Europa Or Enceladus, Where Should NASA Look For Life?

Photo of Europa taken during NASA's Galileo mission.
Credit Courtesy of NASA

Ross Reynolds talks to Alan Boyle, science editor for NBCNews.com, about the recent discovery of water on Saturn's moon Enceladus. Boyle also talks about NASA's proposed mission to Europa and how the agency decides where to focus its space exploration dollars.

Natural Disasters
2:49 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Disasters: The Wake-Up Calls That Never Happen

Credit Irwin Redlener's book, "Americans at Risk."

Ross Reynolds talks with Irwin Redlener, author of "Americans at Risk: Why We Are Not Prepared for Megadisasters and What We Can Do." Redlener explains why natural disasters like the Oso landslide are rarely the wake-up calls we'd expect.

Food
3:11 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Extra Virginity: Historical Toil Of Olive Oil

Credit Tom Mueller's book, "Extra Virginity."

Marcie Sillman talks with author Tom Mueller about his book, "Extra Virginity: The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil."

Reporter's Notebook
10:16 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Remembering The Day Kurt Cobain's Music Died

Krist Novoselic and Kurt Cobain, "Nevermind" release at Beehive Records in Seattle on Sept. 16, 1991.
Courtesy of Charles Peterson

It was 20 years ago, but I remember it clearly: April 8, 1994, the day the world found out that Nirvana front man Kurt Cobain was dead.

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American Hikers' Memoir
9:18 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Surviving Iranian Prison In 'A Sliver Of Light'

Credit Shane Bauer, Joshua Fattal and Sarah Shourd's memoir, "A Sliver of Light."

Steve Scher talks with American hikers Shane Bauer, Sarah Shourd and Josh Fattal. Their memoir, “A Sliver of Light: Three Americans Imprisoned in Iran,” is about how they spent two years in prison after the trio wandered over the Iranian border in 2009.

Wildlife
4:06 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Northwest Researchers Document Whales Which Set New Breath-Hold Record

Satellite tag being attached to the dorsal fin of a Cuvier's beaked whale. The tagging arrow can be seen in the air as it detaches from the tag.
Erin Falcone Cascadia Research under NOAA permit 16111

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 5:21 pm

Think about how long you can hold your breath and then let this discovery blow your mind.

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