Arts & Life

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Comforting Traditions
7:25 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Funeral Dinners Help Darrington Cope With Losses

Darrington Community Center hosted a meal for librarian Linda McPherson as part of the community's long-running tradition.
Credit KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The first wave of memorial services honoring the victims who perished in the Oso landslide took place this weekend.

In Darrington, residents gathered to remember Linda McPherson, a longtime resident and librarian. After the service, the community gathered for a meal together. It's a special tradition that goes back many decades in this small community.

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The Week In Review
4:02 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Slow SPD Reform, Health Care Milestone, And The Mariners Start Strong

The Seattle Mariners kicked off their season on March 31.
Credit Flickr Photo/Dinur Blum (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher recaps the news of the week with Knute Berger of Crosscut and Seattle Magazine, political analyst C.R. Douglas for Q13 Fox News and associate editor Eli Sanders of The Stranger.

Bloopers
3:43 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Whoops! Getting It Wrong On 'The Record'

KUOW's Steve Scher and Marcie Sillman have some fun while pitching on Friday.
Credit KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

As KUOW wraps up another successful spring pledge drive, we take a moment to reflect on our not-so-finest moments of public radio — it's The Record's blooper reel.

History
3:10 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Gary Heyde On Martin Luther King Jr.'s Assassination

Martin Luther King Jr.
Credit Flickr Photo/Digital Collections, UIC Library (CC BY-NC-ND)

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated 46 years ago today — on April 4, 1968. Former Seattle teacher and novelist Gary Heyde remembers that day well. It was the day he learned one of the most important lessons of his life, but he almost didn't survive to apply the lesson.

This archive originally aired in October 2011.

Baseball Books
2:54 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Nancy Pearl: Swing And A Hit

Credit Flickr Photo/Mike Rastiello (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with librarian Nancy Pearl about just a few of the many baseball books available, just in time for Tuesday's Opening Night at Safeco Field.

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Space Exploration
2:49 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Mars, Europa Or Enceladus, Where Should NASA Look For Life?

Photo of Europa taken during NASA's Galileo mission.
Credit Courtesy of NASA

Ross Reynolds talks to Alan Boyle, science editor for NBCNews.com, about the recent discovery of water on Saturn's moon Enceladus. Boyle also talks about NASA's proposed mission to Europa and how the agency decides where to focus its space exploration dollars.

Natural Disasters
2:49 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Disasters: The Wake-Up Calls That Never Happen

Credit Irwin Redlener's book, "Americans at Risk."

Ross Reynolds talks with Irwin Redlener, author of "Americans at Risk: Why We Are Not Prepared for Megadisasters and What We Can Do." Redlener explains why natural disasters like the Oso landslide are rarely the wake-up calls we'd expect.

Food
3:11 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Extra Virginity: Historical Toil Of Olive Oil

Credit Tom Mueller's book, "Extra Virginity."

Marcie Sillman talks with author Tom Mueller about his book, "Extra Virginity: The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil."

American Hikers' Memoir
9:18 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Surviving Iranian Prison In 'A Sliver Of Light'

Credit Shane Bauer, Joshua Fattal and Sarah Shourd's memoir, "A Sliver of Light."

Steve Scher talks with American hikers Shane Bauer, Sarah Shourd and Josh Fattal. Their memoir, “A Sliver of Light: Three Americans Imprisoned in Iran,” is about how they spent two years in prison after the trio wandered over the Iranian border in 2009.

Wildlife
4:06 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Northwest Researchers Document Whales Which Set New Breath-Hold Record

Satellite tag being attached to the dorsal fin of a Cuvier's beaked whale. The tagging arrow can be seen in the air as it detaches from the tag.
Erin Falcone Cascadia Research under NOAA permit 16111

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 5:21 pm

Think about how long you can hold your breath and then let this discovery blow your mind.

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Animals In Captivity
2:44 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

'Horrible Torture:' The Argument Against Elephants Kept In Zoos

Credit Flickr Photo/Jonavin (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Gay Bradshaw about why she thinks elephants don't belong in zoos. Bradshaw is the executive director of the Kerulos Center in Jacksonville, Ore., and author of "Elephants on the Edge: What Animals Teach Us About Humanity."

Play Ball!
2:44 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

The Strange Language Of Baseball

Credit Flickr Photo/Keith-Allison (CC BY-NC-ND)

From 'cup of coffee' to 'Bronx cheer,' Ross Reynolds runs the language bases of baseball with linguist Ben Zimmer.

Author Interview
1:10 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Nicholson Baker's New Novel 'Traveling Sprinkler'

Credit Nicholson Baker's book, "Traveling Sprinkler."

In his new book “Traveling Sprinkler,” novelist Nicholson Baker tells the story of a 55-year-old poet’s obsession with electronic dance music, Debussy, and his ex girlfriend who works as a local NPR radio host. Baker has written nine novels and five books of non-fiction and speaks with The Record's Ross Reynolds.

This interview originally aired on September 30, 2013.

Author Interview
12:56 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Garrison Keillor: Poets Should Try To Make Their Mothers Laugh Sometimes

Credit Garrison Keillor's book, "O, What A Luxury."

Steve Scher talks with Garrison Keillor about his first collection of original poetry, "O, What A Luxury: Verses Vulgar, Pathetic & Profound.”

This interview originally aired on November 6, 2013.

Rare Music Scores
11:16 am
Wed April 2, 2014

UW Music Library Scores Big With Large Bequest

First edition score by Peter Tchaikovsky from the William Crawford III Rare Music Collection, University of Washington.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

William Crawford had a passion. During his lifetime, he collected rare, first edition vocal musical scores. By the time he died in 2013, he had amassed more than 700 scores by such famous composers as Beethoven, Bach and Wagner. Now those scores have found a home in Seattle.

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