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Chinese American
11:36 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Eric Liu: Chinese State Media Editorial On Locke 'Laughable'

The former Washington governor Gary Locke served as the U.S. ambassador to China from 2011 to 2014.
Flickr Photo/Linda Cotton (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Eric Liu, founder of Citizen University and former speech writer for President Bill Clinton, about the offensive editorial published in the Chinese state media about the departure of Ambassador Gary Locke.

Downtown Harbor
11:08 am
Thu March 6, 2014

To Reshape Seattle's Waterfront, Planners Look To Past

By the end of the 1920s, Seattle's waterfront was crowded with docks and its skyline was getting taller. This photo, taken from Colman Dock around 1931, is part of a panorama view of the city. The tallest landmarks are the Exchange Building (left) and Smith Tower (right).
Credit Courtesy of Museum of History & Industry

Historians point to the early months of 1852 as the time that downtown Seattle was founded. One Sunday in late winter of that year, members of the Denny Party, a group of settlers from Illinois who’d arrived at Alki a few months earlier, paddled across Elliott Bay.

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Books News & Features
10:00 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Re-Released Recordings Reveal Literary Titans In Their Youth

James Baldwin, shown here in 1964, was the first in a series of authors Harry and Lynne Sharon Schwartz recorded.
Jenkins Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 10:19 am

You can listen to plenty of actors performing the works of William Shakespeare. But imagine if you could hear the voice of the young playwright himself — or the older one, for that matter — reading his own writing aloud.

Well, we can't take you back that far. But in the early 1960s, when recorded readings by authors were rare, a young couple in Boston decided to be literary audio pioneers.

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Book Reviews
9:38 am
Thu March 6, 2014

'Black Moon' Imagines A Sleepless American Nightmare

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 4:03 am

"It was a great time for storytellers," says Matthew Biggs, the central character in Kenneth Calhoun's haunting debut novel, Black Moon. The irony of his comment comes with a horrific aftertaste: The world is suffering from a sudden, unexplainable pandemic that's made everyone a perpetual insomniac. Biggs is one of the few who can still sleep. Humanity's state of chronic wakefulness has caused mass insanity — in the noonday sun, dreams overflow and chaos reigns.

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Urbanization
9:34 am
Thu March 6, 2014

‘Department Of Hometown Security’ With Majora Carter

Majora Carter
ced.berkeley.edu

In a way, Majora Carter’s dog is partially responsible for the existence of a Bronx park. More than a decade ago, Carter was pulled by her dog into a vacant, trashed lot and onto the banks of the Bronx River. After securing a USDA Forest Service program grant, Carter worked with community groups over five years to build the award-winning Hunts Point Riverside Park.

Carter is an urban revitalization strategist who examines the connection between urbanization and the environment. She spoke at the University of Washington’s Kane Hall on January 22, 2014, as part of the UW Graduate School lecture series.

Teatro Zinzanni
8:04 am
Thu March 6, 2014

If These Velvet Walls Could Talk

Teatro Zinzanni Founder Norm Langill
Courtesy of Teatro Zinzanni

Across from the Seattle Center on Mercer Street, there’s a white, pre-fabricated, nondescript building with a couple of flags outside. The exterior is really camouflage for a 100-year-old velvet tent imported from Belgium.

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Local Music
4:18 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Seattle Band Ravenna Woods Plays Live At KUOW

(Left to right) Sam Miller, Chris Cunningham, KUOW's Steve Scher, Nicolas Danielson, Matt Badger and Brantley Duke at the KUOW studios. Miller, Cunningham, Badger and Duke are members of the Northwest indie rock band, Ravenna Woods. Danielson is a Seattle-based musician, composer and sound designer.
Credit KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Steve Scher talks with guitarist Chris Cunningham and drummer Matt Badger of the Northwest indie band, Ravenna Woods. The band performed a few songs from its new album, "The Jackals," in the KUOW studios.

News From Canada
3:58 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Canada's Ukrainians, Water Wars, And Rob Ford Does Late Night

Rob Ford appeared on "Jimmy Kimmel Live" on Monday, March 3.
AP Photo/Randy Holmes

Steve Scher talks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about this week's news from Canada, including a reaction from Canadian-Ukrainians to the crisis in Ukraine, and Rob Ford's stint on Jimmy Kimmel Live.

Environment
3:58 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

World's Largest Caspian Tern Colony Could Be Relocated

A Caspian tern snatches a fish out of the water.
Flickr Photo/TJ Gehling (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Dan Roby, wildlife ecology professor at the Oregon State University, about a plan to relocate a colony of salmon-eating Caspian terns from the mouth of the Columbia River.

Health Care Cost Savers
2:43 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

The Town Where Everyone Talks About Death

Downtown La Crosse, Wisconsin.
J. Stephen Conn Flickr

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 11:05 am

George Phillips has his death planned out. His wife Betty has planned hers. They have filled out an advance directive, outlining how they want to die.

Their neighbors across the street have filled out the same paperwork, as has the family next door. In fact, in La Crosse, Wisconsin, you're unusual if you don't have a plan for your death. Some 96 percent of people who die in La Crosse have an advance directive or similar documentation. Nationally, only about 30 percent of adults have a document like that.

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Book Interview
12:20 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Vladimir Putin: Madman Or A Mastermind?

Masha Gessen's book "The Man Without a Face."

Steve Scher talks with Masha Gessen, author of The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin, about the Russian president's erratic behavior during the Ukrainian conflict.

Author Interviews
9:44 am
Wed March 5, 2014

When War-Torn Rubble Met Royal Imagination, 'Paris Became Paris'

Le Pont Neuf, shown here in an 18th-century painting by Nicolas-Jean-Baptiste Raguenet, was completed in 1606 by Henry IV. The bridge's construction kicked off the reinvention of Paris in the 17th century. Today, it's the oldest standing bridge across the Seine.
Public Domain

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:04 am

Today, Paris is a city of light and romance, full of broad avenues, picturesque bridges and countless tourists visiting to soak in its charms.

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Author Interviews
3:09 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Neanderthal Man: How All Humans Are Africans

Svante Pääbo's book "Neanderthal Man."

David Hyde talks with author Svante Pääbo about his book "Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes" and what it means to be part-Neanderthal.

Marketing Health
2:59 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Are You Buying Pseudoscience At The Grocery Store?

Flickr Photo/greggavedon.com (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with freelance journalist Michael Schulson about his Daily Beast article, "Whole Foods: America's Temple of Pseudoscience."

Fish And Wildlife
2:58 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Salmon Forecast Predicts 'Historical Run' For Chinook And Coho

Flickr Photo/Eva Funderburgh (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Ryan Lothrop, recreational fishery manager at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, about forecasting salmon runs for the 2014-15 fishing season.

Lothrop said about 283,000 Chinook and 870,000 coho salmon are expected to return to Puget Sound this year.

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