Arts

Composer Wayne Horvitz.
Courtesy of Nica Horvitz

Seattle’s Richard Hugo House is a literary center in a large wood-frame house, just east of Cal Anderson Park in the Capitol Hill neighborhood.

The center’s namesake, the late poet Richard Hugo, might be taken aback by the trendy restaurants and modern condo buildings that now vie for space in one of the city’s hippest and most expensive neighborhoods.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Nancy Pearl was born in Detroit. She tells KUOW's Marcie Sillman that first-time novelist Angela Flournoy gets the city just right in her book, "The Turner House." It traces the history of a family through the civil rights era and beyond in a struggling city.  

Misty Upham arrives for a screening at the Cannes film festival in Cannes, France, on May 17, 2013.
Todd Williamson/Invision/AP, File

Native American actress Misty Upham had an impressive resume, having appeared on screen with Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts in the film "August: Osage County," and with Benicio del Toro in "Jimmy P." But her personal life was in stark contrast to her Hollywood dream.

In October 2014, Upham was living in Auburn with her parents when she went missing. A recent investigative report on the disappearance by Kristen Millares Young for The Guardian found the Auburn police did very little to help find her.

Bonnie Milligan has a big voice.

And in the Oregon Shakespeare Festival musical, Head Over Heels, she does a lot of belting. That’s the loud, powerful, high singing associated with performers like Christina Aguilera, Mariah Carey and Whitney Houston.

The problem is, it’s been a smoky summer in the Pacific Northwest. Wildfires have had communities from Eastern Washington to Portland to Northern California gasping through days and weeks of poor air quality.

And belting and smoke don’t mix.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Patrice Demombynes, a long-time friend of artist Rolon Bert Garner and the owner of the Virginia Inn. Garner died on  Aug. 17. He had a big impact on the Seattle art scene during his life. 

Ross Reynolds interviews Larry Gossett and Bob Santos, two members of Seattle’s "Gang of Four." In the social turmoil of the 1960s and 70s, four Seattle political activists came of age: Roberto Maestas from the Latino community, Native American activist Bernie Whitebear , Bob Santos of the Asian community, and African American leader Larry Gossett.

Santos is the co-author of “Gang of Four: Four Leaders. Four Communities. One Friendship."

Roger Shimomura's "American in Disguise"
Courtesy Tacoma Art Museum

Roger Shimomura wasn't even three years old when he and his family were sent to the Puyallup Assembly Center in 1942. He celebrated his third birthday there.

That's one of his earliest memories.

Join Marcie Sillman and your fellow listeners for KUOW's Front Row Center at Intiman Theatre. Watch "The Children's Hour," then join us for a post-play conversation with Marcie Sillman and producing artistic director Andrew Russell!

This classic play by Lillian Hellman has been re-set in 1980s Seattle by veteran local director Sheila Daniels.

As a friend of KUOW, you will get a 15 percent discount for the September 17 show at 7:30 p.m. Just use promo code KUOW15 when you purchase your ticket online.

We're looking forward to seeing you at Intiman!

Lovincer from Uganda works managing her fresh banana business to support her family.
Facebook Photo/Kiva

Jessica Jackley was a liberal arts major who stumbled her way into the Stanford MBA program.

Philosophy and business came together for her in 2005 when she helped start Kiva, the world’s first person- to-person microlending website. Kiva facilitates lending to poor and underserved entrepreneurs and students in 83 countries.

Operagoers visit replica of horse stall where Japanese-American families were housed en route to camps.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Opera patrons tend to glide toward their seats, downing last drops of Prosecco before the doors close.

But this Seattle opera wants to draw you in from the moment you step into the grand hall. Case in point: Patrons entering the McCaw Hall lobby pass through a checkpoint where actors dressed as guards assign numbers.

“This is your family number,” they tell you, “please keep it with you at all times.”

Special, important, brilliant: That’s the rave review from Nancy Pearl for this week’s reading pick, and she doesn’t use those words lightly. The book is “The Sympathizer,” by Viet Thanh Nguyen,  an associate professor of English and American Studies and Ethnicities at USC who was born in Vietnam and came to the United States as a refugee in 1975.

His novel follows an unnamed main character from South Vietnam who acts a spy for the North around the end of the war.

Pearl told Marcie Sillman on KUOW’s The Record that it should be on everyone’s must-read list, but it’s not an easy read.

“It is laugh-aloud funny in many places and terrifying and harrowing to read in other places,” she said. “But it took a lot for me to read it. It took a lot of compartmentalizing on my part.”

Former PNB dancer Ariana Lallone at Teatro Zinzanni.
Courtesy of Teatro Zinzanni/Michael Doucett

She may kill me for revealing her age, but what the heck? 

Ariana Lallone is 47 years old, and she’s as striking and vibrant as the first time I saw her dance with Pacific Northwest Ballet 20 years ago.

Courtesy of Helen Peppe

Elizabeth Austen talks with Marcie Sillman about a new chapbook from Seattle poet and teacher Quenton Baker.

Baker peels back layers of language to reveal the ways both blackness and whiteness are racialized in "Diglossic in the Second America," just published by Punch Press. 

Unfolding The History Of Napkin Art

Aug 12, 2015

Napkins today are mundane and practical, made from paper or cheap factory cloth and folded, if at all, hastily into a rectangle. In the past, napkins weren't just for wiping hands or protecting clothing — they were works of art.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with Nancy Pearl about this week's reading pick: a new graphic biography of the famous Apple co-founder called "Steve Jobs: Insanely Great," by Jessie Hartland. Pearl says it rivals even Walter Isaacson's "Steve Jobs," which is considered the definitive biography of the tech leader.

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