Author Robert Dugoni at a book signing at the Tin Room Bar & Grill in Burien, Wash., in 2009.
Flickr Photo/Michael @ NW Lens (CC BY NC ND)/

Ross Reynolds interviews best selling Northwest writer Bob Dugoni about his  new crime novel, "Her Final Breath," the second in his series focusing on Seattle detective Tracy Crosswhite. Dugoni used two local police officers to help get the facts of police procedure right: Seattle detective Jennifer Southworth, who was in part the inspiration for the Tracy Crosswhite character, and  King County Sheriff's department detective Scott Tompkins.

Jim Woodring won the 2010 Stranger genius award in literature. Woodring is best known for his cartoonish animalish creations. This is a still from Frank in the 3rd Dimension, 2015
Frye Museum

Name the first genius that comes to mind.

Artist Leonardo da Vinci?

What about composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart?

Flickr Photo/Eierschneider (CC BY 2.0)/

If America's gun debate is stuck, what would un-stick it? Is it time to ban youth football? Was Renoir that bad at painting? And who else is overrated?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with writer Sherman Alexie, Washington state Senator Pramila Jayapal and Paul Guppy of the Washington Policy Center.

"Ken Meeks, PWA," by Alon Reininger
Courtesy of Tacoma Art Museum/Contact Photo Images

Tacoma Art Museum has opened a new exhibit called "Art AIDS America." It includes what co-curator Jonathan David Katz calls the first work of AIDS art, an abstract piece from 1981 by Israeli-born artist Izhar Patkin.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir's "The Luncheon of the Boating Party," finished in 1881. Renoir was a founder of the impressionist painting movement but moved on to other styles.

Was Pierre-Auguste Renoir a “far more complex and thoughtful painter than generally assumed” who influenced a generation of avant-garde artists, or was he “the most overrated artist east, west, north and south of the river Seine”?

Ten years ago, Stephenie Meyer put a twist on the whole boy-meets-girl thing.

In her young adult novel Twilight, girl meets vampire and, later, werewolf. The supernatural romance between Bella and Edward sparked a saga that includes four best-selling books translated into more than 50 languages and five blockbuster movies.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman gets a reading recommendation from librarian Nancy Pearl, who suggests that if you are a fan of Terry Pratchett, you may like "The Murdstone Trilogy: A Novel," by Mal Peet.

The signs read: "Take 'em down! Renoir sucks!" and "We're not iconoclasts[;] Renoir just sucks at painting!"

Led by Max Geller, a handful of people protested Monday outside Boston's Museum of Fine Arts.

Their grievance?

The fact that paintings by renowned French Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir are hanging in the museum.

Children's book author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, points to a 3-year-old fan Marcus Gabrielli as he signed autographs in New York.
AP Photo/Mike Appleton

Did Maurice Sendak, author of "Where The Wild Things Are," talk to kids about his work?

It was 1991, and Sendak had come into the KUOW studios for an interview with Ross Reynolds on “Saturday Afternoon.”  

Hillary Clinton was on NBC's Saturday Night Live during the 2008 campaign and appeared alongside Amy Poehler, her alter ego on the show.

They poked through the facade. Clinton went on as herself, wearing the same pantsuit as Poehler, who feigned awkwardness about sharing the screen with the woman she mocked weekly (though Poehler and Clinton say they are friends in real life).

Last night, Clinton again appeared on SNL — on the season premiere.

Author Walter Mosley and his father in front of their home in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles.

People usually remember as far back as the generation that raises them, says writer Walter Mosley.

Mosley had come into KUOW’s studios to speak with KUOW’s Ross Reynolds. It was 1992, and his third book, "White Butterfly," had just been published.

Easy Rawlins, Mosley’s main character, emerged from those memories. Easy was a fixer, a guy who does favors for people.

For more than 10 years, disease had slowly eaten away at He Quangui's lungs, leaving him, for the most part, bedridden.

But He was no smoker — he was a Chinese gold miner. He was stricken with silicosis, a respiratory illness caused by inhaling silica dust. An estimated 6 million Chinese miners suffer from the debilitating disease pneumoconiosis — of which silicosis is one form.

Before he created The Simpson, Matt Groening created the 'Life in Hell' comic series. Among his characters were Akbar and Jeff, whose origins go back to Groening's fifth-grade attempts at mimicking 'Peanuts.'
Matt Groening / 'Life In Hell'

Before The Simpsons, there were crazy rabbits and Akbar and Jeff.

Matt Groening, who created television’s most iconic cartoon family, spoke with Ross Reynolds in the late 1980s on the show Saturday Afternoon.

Such a little bandaid for a big ouch!
Courtesy Bond Huberman

When writer Eula Biss was pregnant, she absorbed some of the fear about vaccines.   

“Fear is almost contagious itself, and so I caught some fears,” she told KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel.

Ross Reynolds interviews novelist Stephanie Clifford about her New York Times best seller “Everybody Rise,” the story of  a 26-year-old from Maryland who tries to fit in with the wealthy New York elite. It's a contemporary take on Edith Wharton's "House of Mirth". 

Clifford  based her book on her experience of culture shock after moving from Seattle to the East Coast. When she’s not writing novels Clifford is a a New York Times reporter covering courts.