Arts

book Christmas holiday reading
Flickr Photo/Enokson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets a last minute gift recommendation from Seattle's jolliest librarian, Nancy Pearl. If you still have a child on your list, she suggests picking up "Take Away the A," by Michael Escoffier and Chris DiGiacomo.

When Beth Barrett was a girl, she and her mother had a Christmas ritual.

"My mom and I would watch 'The Sound of Music,'" says Barrett, now director of programming for SIFF, the organization that produces the annual Seattle International Film Festival. For her, the holidays weren't complete with this familiar cinematic ritual.

Poet Nora Giron-Dolce at a Seattle bus stop.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

If you live in King County, you're surrounded by public artworks: murals, sculptures, fountains — you name it. Art is everywhere in this region.

That's due in large part to the county's One Percent for Art Program, one of the oldest in the nation. One percent of public construction project budgets are set aside for art or integrated design for those specific projects.

Author Richard Ford, Livre sur la Place, September 2014.
Flickr Photo/ActuaLitte

Ross Reynolds interviews Pulitzer prize-winning novelist Richard Ford about his new book of novellas, “Let Me Be Frank With You."

It continues the story of Frank Bascombe, which began in Ford's earlier works, "The Sportswriter," "Independence Day" and "Lay of the Land."

Karen Finneyfrock
Courtesy of Inti St. Clair

If you could go back in time, what would you want to say to your teenage self?

Writers Karen Finneyfrock, Rachel McKibbens and Mindy Nettifee decided to gather poems they wished they'd had when they were younger. 

"If we could give [teenage girls] one charm to tuck into their pockets, it would be courage," reads an excerpt from the introduction of their new anthology, "Courage: Daring Poems for Gutsy Girls."

One of the most famous sights on the University of Washington Seattle campus is when the cherry trees bloom in the quad each spring.
Flickr Photo/Michael Matti (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds takes a tour of the University of Washington campus with Antoinette Wills and John Bolcer, co-authors of the new book "The University of Washington," which tells the 119 year history of the campus through the buildings. They talk about a 1960s bombing at UW that remains a great unsolved mystery and the story behind the strange stone faces atop all the buildings in the liberal arts Quad.

War Service Library Bookplate, 1918
Flickr Photo/William Creswell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman checks in with esteemed librarian Nancy Pearl to get her recommendation for a great historical read: "The Unsubstantial Air: American Flyers in the First World War," by Samuel Hynes.

Flickr Photo/GeekGirlCon

She was the nasal-voiced puppeteer behind Red Fraggle on Jim Henson’s Fraggle Rock, and she hung out with David Bowie on the set of Labyrinth.

United Methodist pastor Frank Schaefer speaks during a news conference Tuesday, June 24, 2014, at First United Methodist Church of Germantown in Philadelphia.
AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Ross Reynolds talks with Frank Schaefer, author of "Defrocked: How A Father's Act of Love Shook the United Methodist Church," about his decision to officiate his son's same-sex marriage and the ensuing case over his dismissal from position as pastor in the Methodist church.

This segment originally aired October 20, 2014.

Ross Reynolds interviews Seattle jazz pianist, composer and bandleader Overton Berry about his long long career stretching back 50 years.

Berry played at clubs around the 1962 World’s Fair and performed during Seattle's funk explosion of the 1970s. 

Couch Fest seeks to bring strangers together for a unique movie watching experience.
Flickr Photo/Mike Harber (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Couch Fest founder Craig Downing about why he thought a film festival where strangers get together in different houses to watch short films could help alleviate the "Seattle freeze."

Author Ruth Ozeki.
Flickr Photo/Kris Krug (CC-BY-NC-ND)

If you’re driving a car or operating other heavy machinery when you listen to this Speakers Forum podcast, we hope you’ll pull over for the guided meditation portion. But don’t be alarmed. This talk is more likely to invigorate and inspire you than put you under a spell. And it may change forever how you react when your smart phone vibrates with some bit of news.

File photo.
Flickr Photo/Lis Ferla (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Joel Beckerman about his new book, "The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms The Way We Think, Feel And Buy," and about his work as a composer and sound designer.

The most closed country on earth — North Korea — is now denying its involvement in one of the biggest corporate hacks in history.

Someone attacked Sony Pictures Entertainment last week and made public troves of stolen data, including five unreleased films, medical records and salaries of nearly 7,000 global employees. But before a recent denial — another North Korean diplomat played coy about the country's involvement.

The people behind "Now I'm Fine," a performance that melds music, comedy and storytelling at On The Boards this week.
On The Boards

It was 2006, and Ahamlefule J. Oluo was not fine. 

"I was very young, in my early 20s," he says. "I had just gone through a divorce." 

His Nigerian father, a man he'd never met and only spoken with once on the telephone, had died before Oluo got to fulfill his wish of forging a relationship with him.

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