Animals

The green sea turtle typically lives in tropical waters, like the shores of Mexico or Hawaii.

But recently, scientists have discovered a population swimming year-round in a river just south of Los Angeles. It's the northernmost group of these turtles known to science.

Visit the 3-mile stretch of the San Gabriel River in Long Beach, wait a few a minutes, and Cassandra Davis says you'll usually see their heads above the water.

'Small' Oil Spills Can Add Up To Big Costs

Mar 23, 2015

State Fish and Wildlife Biologist Brian McDonald is careful not to raise his voice as he approaches a row of baby cribs in a warehouse in Pasco, Washington. Each one holds mallard ducks.

“They’re typically in pretty rough shape--they’re sick, they’re cold, they’re oiled, they’re hungry,” he says.

horse racing
Wikimedia Commons

Marcie Sillman talks with Doug Moore, executive secretary of Washington State's Horse Racing Commission, about trends in the industry and what the future of Emerald Downs could mean for horse racing in Washington.

Federal law generally prohibits the import of ivory, but it's legal to sell domestically if the ivory was harvested before 1976.

You might think that a bill that would outlaw something that doesn't even take place in Oregon might sail through the legislature.

From bomb and drug-sniffing duties to neighborhood patrol, dogs are widely used in law enforcement. Many agencies rely on volunteer canine teams to assist them with search and rescue operations and criminal investigations.

But the county of Los Angeles has a full-time four-legged detective on its payroll: Indiana Bones, or "Indy."

Karina Peck, an investigator and canine handler with the Los Angeles County coroner's office, is in a truck, rolling over uneven, hard-packed earth that dead-ends in a shallow canyon.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee declared drought today in three regions of the Evergreen state: the Olympic Peninsula, the east side of the Cascade Mountains including Yakima and Wenatchee, and the Walla Walla region. 

The daffodils and tulips are up and so are hungry black bears. Our unseasonably mild winter is bringing black bears out of hibernation earlier than usual.

Action Taken To Protect Fish At Bottom Of Ocean Food Chain

Mar 10, 2015

West Coast fishery managers adopted a new rule Tuesday that protects many species of forage fish at the bottom of the ocean food chain.

The rule prohibits commercial fishing of herring, smelt, squid and other small fish that aren't currently targeted by fishermen. It sets up new, more protective regulations for anyone who might want to start fishing for those species in the future.

An orca pod travels past the Seattle skyline. A new study shows that pods are most likely led by older females.
Courtesy of NOAA/Candice Emmons

Nearly every mammal on earth reproduces until they die – except for humans, and two species of whales.

A new study shows that older, female killer whales are most likely to lead their pods as they travel through the salmon foraging grounds of the Pacific Northwest.

Keep grizzly bears in Alaska, residents of Central Washington residents have told federal agencies. Agencies are considering reintroducing the bears to the area.
EarthFix Photo

Bill Bruton, who lives in the foothills of the North Cascades, isn’t too keen on having grizzly bears as his neighbors.

That’s a proposition that has drawn dozens of his neighbors to meetings hosted by federal agencies in central Washington – Okanogon, Winthrop and Wenatchee. Those agencies want to reintroduce the animals to this part of the state, where ranches and homesteads butt up against public forestland.

Washington's Makah Indian tribe wants to resume its traditional practice of whale hunting.

The first step in winning federal approval came Friday, when NOAA Fisheries issued a draft environmental impact statement analyzing the tribe's request.

Bamboo, 47, an Asian elephant, walks toward people watching her at the Woodland Park Zoo Nov. 19, 2014.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Seattle officials did not stand in the way of the decision to send Woodland Park Zoo's elephants to Oklahoma, should they have? How important is it when a state lawmaker refers to "colored people"? Will too little winter snow mean summer drought? And can we compost the dead?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s top stories with The Stranger’s Dan Savage, Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter and Crosscut’s Knute Berger.

It's March, and that means college basketball fans are gearing up for the NCAA tournament. But there's another tournament taking place this month — and animals aren't the mascots, they're the competitors.

"Mammal March Madness" is organized by a team of evolutionary biologists. They choose 65 animal competitors and then imagine the outcome of a series of simulated interspecies battles. Who would win if a kangaroo took on a warthog? Or if an orca fought a polar bear?

You might call it the forester's version of Google Earth: new satellite mapping that's giving scientists a clearer view of insect outbreaks in Northwest forests.

A study published this week describes how scientists with Oregon State University have combined new satellite imagery with older data from airplane and ground surveys to show in unprecedented detail where insects are damaging trees in the region.

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