Animals

Pages

Animal Behavior
11:24 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Dogs Understand Fairness, Get Jealous, Study Finds

Originally published on Tue December 9, 2008 8:07 am

Dogs have an intuitive understanding of fair play and become resentful if they feel that another dog is getting a better deal, a new study has found.

The study, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, looked at how dogs react when a buddy is rewarded for the same trick in an unequal way.

Read more
Orcas
7:46 am
Tue July 22, 2014

EarthFix Conversation: Puget Sound Whales For Sale

A young orca captured in Penn Cove in 1970, which is believed to be Lolita, an orca that whale activists have been fighting to have set free in Puget Sound after 44 years in captivity at the Seaquarium in Miami.
Dr. Terrell Newby

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:00 am

The resident killer whales of Puget Sound are an endangered species. There are about 80 of them left.

But there was a time, not too long ago, when people were catching these whales and selling them into captivity.

Sandra Pollard has documented the history of orca capture in Puget Sound in a new book: Puget Sound Whales For Sale: The Fight To End Orca Hunting.

She spoke with EarthFix's Ashley Ahearn about this dark period in orca history.

Ashley Ahearn: Let’s go back in time here a little bit, why did people start catching orcas?

Read more
EarthFix Reports
6:51 am
Mon July 21, 2014

How To Listen For A Spotted Bat

People can hear the spotted bat's echolocation. One group of nature lovers recently spent a night out tracking the bats in central Washington to check-in on how bat populations are doing in the state.
Paul Cryan

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 12:00 pm

Moses Coulee is a bat-lovers paradise. Washington is home to 15 species of these flying mammals and you can find 14 of them in this deep ravine about 45 minutes north of Ephrata.

And one of those species is the most rare type of bat in the state: the spotted bat.

There’s one thing especially cool about this bat: people can hear its echolocation. (Audio courtesy of Neal Hedges.)

Read more
Food
4:52 am
Mon July 21, 2014

To Save These Pigs, Ky. Farmer Says We Have To Eat Them

Kentucky hog farmer Travis Hood with Luther, a young Red Wattle boar. Hood started raising Red Wattles five years ago after cuts to his job, and began turning a profit on the meat in February.
Courtesy of Hood's Heritage Hogs

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 11:54 am

Robertson County has the smallest population of any county in the state of Kentucky, and it's the only one, word has it, without a stoplight.

So it's an unlikely place to find a campaign to keep the food system more genetically diverse. But that is exactly what's happening on a small farm owned by Travis Hood, called Hood's Heritage Hogs.

Read more
Bobo The Gorilla
7:55 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Celebrating Bobo, Seattle’s Most Famous Primate

Bobo, taxidermied and on display at the old MOHAI location in Montlake.
Credit Flickr Photo/Jesse Means (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Mid-July in Seattle means Seafair events, the actual arrival of summer and – if you lived here in the 1950s and '60s – it meant the annual birthday celebration for the city’s most famous primate, Bobo the gorilla.

Read more
Climate Change
7:41 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Endangered Species Listing For Wolverine Looking Doubtful

File photo of a wolverine

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 12:22 pm

A federal threatened species listing for the wolverine is looking increasingly unlikely.

Read more
Endangered Species
3:05 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Komodo Dragons On Display At Nashville Zoo

A Komodo dragon is pictured at the St. Louis Zoo (Poppet Maulding/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 10:37 am

There are less than 2,500 Komodo dragons — the world’s largest living lizards — left in the wild.

The venomous beasts can spend hours in one spot, waiting for a deer, boar, goat or anything sizable and nutritious. By the time the reach adulthood, they can be over 10 feet long and more than 350 pounds.

Read more
Chagas Disease
3:05 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Dogs Carry Kissing Bug Disease In Texas And Latin America

Dogs throughout Latin America carry the Chagas parasite — and boost the risk of people catching it. And it's not just shelter dogs, like these in Mexico, who are at risk. Even family dogs get the deadly disease.
Jose Luis Gonzalez Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 8:47 am

We often think about people spreading diseases around the world. This spring, vacationers brought chikungunya from the Caribbean to the United States. Businessmen have likely spread Ebola across international borders in West Africa. And health care workers have carried a new virus from the Middle East to Asia and Europe.

But what about (wo)man's best friend?

Read more
Escargots
7:31 am
Wed July 16, 2014

U.S. Customs Seize Giant African Snails Bound For Dinner Plates

A single snail from an air cargo shipment of 67 live snails that arrived at Los Angeles International Airport on July 1. Officials said that the 35 pounds of snails arrived from Nigeria along with paperwork stating they were for human consumption.
Greg Bartman AP

Originally published on Sat July 19, 2014 9:21 am

Oh no! Snails are getting a bad name in the U.S.

I'm not talking about the delicate garlic-and-butter escargots that the French favor and savor.

It's giant African land snails, also known as Archachatina marginata, banana rasp snails or a number of other names they go by.

Read more
Pelagornis Sandersi
7:30 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Fossil Discovery May Reveal Largest Bird Ever To Fly

Line drawing of World’s Largest-Ever Flying Bird, Pelagornis sandersi, showing comparative wingspan. Shown left, a California Condor, shown right, a Royal Albatross. (Liz Bradford/WNPR)

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 12:03 pm

An extinct species of bird just discovered by a Connecticut scientist may have been the largest ever to fly. The pelagornis sandersi lived 25 million years ago. The fossil was uncovered at an airport in the 1980s but went largely unnoticed until 2010.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Patrick Skahill of WNPR has the story on the bird with a 24-foot wingspan, and what the finding means for paleontologists.

Read more
EarthFix Reports
7:28 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Feds Phase Out Bee-Harming Pesticides In Northwest Wildlife Refuges

By 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to phase out the use of bee-harming neonicotinoid pesticides on wildlife refuges in the Pacific Northwest.
Courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service https://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwspacific/5695870557/in/set-72157626541514605

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 2:23 pm

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to eliminate the use of bee-harming pesticides on wildlife refuges in the Pacific region by 2016.

A new rule phases out the use of neonicotinoid pesticides – a class of chemical that has been linked to several bee die-offs in Oregon in the past two years, including one that killed 50,000 bumblebees in a Wilsonville parking lot.

Read more
Nasty Neighbors
2:18 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

A Peacock Murder Mystery: (Pea)Fowl Play In California

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 9:29 am

Someone is killing the peacocks in Rolling Hills Estates, Calif.

The boisterous and colorful birds have been a part of this upscale community near Los Angeles for more than a century. In recent years, the birds have become a source of contention among neighbors — but the conflict has taken a dark turn.

The string of peacock killings is now at 50 over the past two years or so — 20 in the past six months alone — by pellet guns, shotguns, arrows and poison.

Read more
Population Control
9:16 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Feds To Remove Fewer Wild Horses From Western Rangelands This Year

File photo of the August 2010 Wild Horse Gather by the Bureau of Land Management at the Stinkingwater Herd Management Area near Burns, Oregon.

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 8:44 am

The federal Bureau of Land Management plans to capture and remove fewer wild horses from Western rangelands this summer. An agency statement blames budget constraints and already-full holding pens.

Read more
They Eat What?
4:24 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Giant Snails Stopped From Entery The U.S. At LAX

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 4:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. U.S. Custom inspectors at LA's international airport are trained to watch for anything fishy. But slimy? This month inspectors discovered dozens of live giant African snails. Each weighs about 2 pounds and measures nearly six inches. Packed in picnic baskets, the snails arrived from Nigeria where they're considered a delicacy. Here in California, though, they're considered an invasion - able to eat paint and 500 types of plants. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Moon Snails
8:16 am
Mon July 14, 2014

What's Killing Clams? Solve This Low Tide Mystery

Why did so many healthy clams turn up dead at low tide last week?
Credit KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

One of the lowest tides of the year this weekend revealed a "crime scene" at the beach at Golden Gardens Park in Seattle.

Read more

Pages