WWII

This week in 1941, Japanese forces attacked Pearl Harbor. Over the next few years, millions of Americans would leave home to fight in Europe and the Pacific. They had few comforts and little in the way of escape or entertainment — at least not until American publishers got involved.

Annie Jacobsen's book, "Operation Paperclip."

David Hyde talks with journalist and author Annie Jacobsen's latest book "Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America." The book is the account of more than a dozen German scientists recruited by the U.S. government after WWII.

Flickr Photo/clappstar

Rick Williams: On Anger, Grief And Gifts

In 2010, woodcarver John T. Williams was killed by Seattle Police Officer Ian Birk. Controversy over the shooting led to much anger and distrust for the police department. In 2012, a 34-foot memorial totem pole was raised in John T. Williams' honor. Steve Scher talked with John T. Williams’ brother Rick Williams at the site of the totem pole.

Talking To Cops

Back in 2012, the Seattle Police asked the public for help. Deputy Chief Nick Metz urged people to talk to the police to help stop what he called a “huge increase” in shootings. That's counter to a strong "don't talk to the cops" mantra espoused by many. Steve Scher talked with columnist Larry Mizell and singer Choklate Moore about why many individuals think talking to the police is unsafe and unwise.

Stories Of WWII Incarceration

Within 48 hours of the December 7 attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, the FBI began arresting the Japanese-Americans they considered subversive. In its second wave of action, the rest of the Japanese-American community along the West Coast was forced to leave their homes and move to incarceration camps. These actions are a strong, vivid and very recent part of our city's history and the legacy of the Japanese-Americans living here. Steve Scher talked with Fumiko Hayashida and Sam Mitsui about their own experiences at that time.

A collector of World War II memorabilia has succeeded in a daunting quest thanks to help from the Japanese government. The veteran from Clarkston, Washington has found the right person to receive a Japanese war flag taken in battle nearly 70 years ago.

Years ago, memorabilia collector George Koller bought an inscribed "good luck flag." It originally belonged to a Japanese fighter pilot killed in combat. Last year, Koller asked the Japanese consulate in Seattle for help to give the flag back.