World Cup

Somebody Is Celebrating Something Today

Jul 29, 2014
KUOW Photo

Today on the RadioActive podcast: stories about celebrations including Eid, pirates getting donuts, people recognizing their accomplishments, and a RadioActivian who guiltily watches the World Cup in Paris.

This show is entirely youth-produced, without the help of RadioActive's mentors. Enjoy! 

Organizers of the next FIFA Women's World Cup hope to leverage the unusually high interest in this year's men's tournament in Brazil to their benefit. Group play and the 2015 World Cup final will take place just across the border in Vancouver, Canada.

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington professor Joe Janes about the original rules of soccer, published in 1863.

FIFA, the international soccer federation, has released its official poster of the 2015 Women’s World Cup.

It’s an artistic rendering of a woman looking up serenely as her long flowing locks are swept away from her face in graceful curves.

AP Photo/Francois Xavier Marit

Seattle officially kicks off its experiment in retail recreational pot. Germany kicks goal after merciless goal in a total rout of Brazil in the World Cup semifinals.

And public officials have a message for the person who dropped off three human skulls at the Bellevue Goodwill this week: You're not in any trouble, but would you please call 206.731.3232. The King County Medical Examiner's Office would like to speak with you.

Luke Burbank steps in for Bill Radke to talk over these stories and more with Eli Sanders, Joni Balter and Knute Berger.

Sorry
Flickr Photo/Stefan Bucher (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Sorry about your loss.

This week City Light’s leader lost $60,000, Facebook lost credibility and the U.S. men's team lost at the World Cup, as always. But KUOW's Bill Radke welcomes a winning panel: Knute Berger, Joni Balter, C.R. Douglas, Luke Burbank and special guest, Monica Guzman.

(Bonus: Name that new Seattle water taxi!)

Flickr Photot/Sounder Bruce (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle City Light hired an online reputation management firm and now the utility would like its money, and its repuation, back. The State Liquor Control board filed emergency marijuana rules. And why does Seattle love soccer, a sport where losing can end happily?

KUOW's Bill Radke kicks those stories and more around with Joni Balter, Knute Berger and Eli Sanders.

Giorgio Chiellini, the Italian defender whose shoulder bore teeth marks after a clash with Uruguay's Luis Suarez during a World Cup match Tuesday, says FIFA's four-month ban of Suarez is too harsh. Chiellini released a statement on his website saying his thoughts are with the star striker and his family.

Flickr Photo/harry_nl (CC-BY-NC-ND)

While visiting Germany for a journalism fellowship, KUOW’s Ross Reynolds shares some firsthand observations of the World Cup fever he’s witnessed during his stay in Berlin, where every game — whether Germany is playing or not — is big.

Reynolds said public viewing areas are all over the city, from the giant public viewing space near the Brandenburg Gate created for some 50,000 people, to the small, neighborhood convenience stores that set out chairs and TVs for customers. Wherever you are watching, he said, the beer and Curryvurst probably isn’t too far away.

“Fun fact about the World Cup here,” Reynolds told fellow Record host Marcie Sillman in a phone interview. “It’s being broadcast by the public television network! Imagine if PBS had the franchise on running the World Series; that’s what it’s like here in Germany.”

FIFA, the governing body of the World Cup, says it has zero tolerance for racist and homophobic conduct by players and fans at this year's international soccer event.

Late last week, FIFA opened an investigation into the display of neo-Nazi banners by both Russian and Croat fans at the World Cup. And Brazil and Mexico face possible sanctions for chanting a homophobic slur during their match last week. But soccer fans say the world is misinterpreting the use of the word and their team spirit.

A video of a staircase used by thousands to get to and from Rio's Maracana stadium shows the structure wobbling unnervingly as spectators left the World Cup game between Argentina and Bosnia on Sunday.

The structure, built on scaffolding, can be seen swaying as fans grab a shaking hand rail. The stairs are the only exit leading to the subway.

You know, it is the 21st century, and it is possible to acknowledge that and make both the World Cup and the Olympics more affordable. The current waste and opulence simply aren't defensible anymore.

For the soccer pooh-bahs to demand that Brazil build new stadiums, costing billions of dollars, is unconscionable. How much more logical to utilize existing stadiums in neighboring countries, in large cities like Buenos Aires, Montevideo and Santiago.

The name John Anthony Brooks likely didn't ring a bell for many Americans before Monday.

But by minute 87 of the U.S. vs. Ghana game, John Brooks had become America's newest national hero.

Flickr Photo/bamoffitteventphotos

David Hyde talks to Duke University professor Laurent Dubois about soccer culture in the United States.

Update at 4:31 p.m. ET

And Brazil does recover, with a goal from star Neymar a few minutes later.

Update at 4:28 p.m. ET

The beautiful game is not so beautiful for Brazil in the early moments of the game: Croatia is ahead 1-0 after an own goal by the home team. It's early, though. Plenty of time for Brazil to recover.

[A tweet from NPR's Russell Lewis in Sao Paulo.]

Update at 10:25 a.m. ET

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