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women

Two separate high-profile incidents broadcast this week highlighted the criticism black women regularly face in the workplace and spurred many to share their own experiences on social media.

USA Women's Hockey Team vs. Finland
FlICKR PHOTO/Alyson Hurt (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6V3tLR

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Storm co-owner Ginny Gilder about the clash between social justice and economics when it comes to women's sports. The conflict has been in the news with the story of the U.S. Women's Hockey team. After months of ugly public negotiations, the women's team finally is being paid a salary and will receive equal benefits to those on the men's hockey team.  

Photo courtesy of Nikki Barron

What difference can a day make? For half of the world’s population who struggle with social, economic, and political inequity, a day honoring women may be only symbolic, but could be life changing.

women's bathroom
Flickr Photo/Wally Gobetz (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/74gjsK

Bill Radke talks with Shannon Keating, LGBT editor for Buzzfeed, about how the relationship between gender and bathrooms goes far beyond the modern controversies over transgender rights. Keating explains how through the years the women's room has represented misogyny and racism. She also details how some of Hollywood's most iconic horror scenes are filmed in the bathroom. 

Outside the home of her foster sister Renee Davis, Danielle Bargala breaks down in tears while talking about how Davis' young children are living with different families. Davis, who was pregnant, was shot at her Muckleshoot reservation home last October.
Dan DeLong for KUOW

The young mom texted her boyfriend: “Come and get the girls or call 911. I’m about to shoot myself.”


Afghan Women Say No To The Dress

Mar 19, 2017

It's a story with a happy ending about a demonstration that didn't happen — after activist Afghan women beat back the Ministry of Education decision that schoolgirls must exchange their current already modest uniforms for styles that are more restrictive and concealing.

On March 14, the Afghan ministry unveiled the new designs. Schools in the country were closed at the time (the school year in Afghanistan goes from March through January and set to reopen on the 20th or 21st. The ministry said the change would be effective when classes resumed.

Who caught the last fish you bought for dinner? If it came from Pacific Northwest waters, the fisherman was very likely a man. Commercial fishing remains a male-dominated profession in the Northwest.

But research by Oregon State University and a federal agency shows evolution in women's roles in the industry.

Twenty years ago, on March 10, 1997, TV audiences were introduced to Buffy Summers, a pint-sized blonde who could hold her own against the undead. Buffy the Vampire Slayer ran for seven seasons from 1997 to 2003. It had witty dialogue and used monsters as a metaphor for everyday high school problems like bullies, catfishing and feeling invisible.

"Gender equality benefits all of us," Iceland's Prime Minister Bjarni Benediktsson said on International Women's Day, as his government works on a law to require companies to show they pay men and women the same salary for the same work.

Benediktsson discussed the plan in New York, where he attended an International Women's Day summit and other meetings this week.

On International Women’s Day, some women walked out of their workspaces or wore the color red in solidarity. Women in the Washington Senate showed off their scarlet themed wardrobes, but didn’t travel too far. Instead, they helped pass legislation supporting pregnant working women in Washington.

A broad coalition of groups across the nation is encouraging women to participate in Wednesday's strike, called "A Day Without A Woman."

The organized protest comes on International Women's Day and follows the successful Women's March in January.

A husband and wife from Port Townsend, Washington, are on their way home after being expelled from Guatemala. The Washingtonians and several other international activists narrowly avoided arrest during a maritime abortion rights protest.

At a conference in Brussels on Thursday, more than a dozen nations and private funders pledged a combined total of $190 million for international family planning charities that stand to lose their U.S. support as a result of President Trump's Jan. 23 executive action to block U.S. foreign aid funding of groups linked to abortion.

What Makes Mira Rai Run?

Feb 26, 2017

Mira Rai is perched on the edge of a couch in Kathmandu in a bright yellow Salomon windbreaker and track pants. The 29-year-old is recovering from knee surgery but looks as if she needs to jump off the couch and burn energy on a mountain trail.

Trail running is, in fact, what the Nepali athlete is known for — along with her unlikely journey from school dropout in a remote Nepali village to Maoist child soldier to national sports hero featured in children's books and depicted in murals.

I'm a black woman of a certain age, a divorced mom of two teenagers who has no choice but to focus daily on the challenges of keeping a home, my family and myself on track. I'm college educated, work in media communications, am precariously middle class — and I am tired of what I witness of today's feminism.

I'd hoped that the Women's March might help me update my perception of feminism, at least as it is commonly portrayed and disseminated of late.

Oregon lawmakers are considering proposals aimed at making sure women are paid the same rate as men for similar work. Two measures were introduced this week.

Women with breast cancer who are at high risk for having a BRCA mutation that raises cancer risk often don't get genetic testing, or even a chance to speak with a genetic counselor who'd help them weigh the necessity of such a test, a study finds.

It's perhaps the unlikeliest symphony orchestra in the world — an all-female ensemble from a strict Muslim society where it's often dangerous for young women to step outside of their homes unescorted. It's called Zohra — the name of a music goddess in Persian literature, according to its founder.

And they were performing at an unlikely venue — a hall attached to Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church, a bombed-out ruin in western Berlin commemorating the horrors of World War II. It's just steps from where Berliners experienced their first ISIS-linked terror attack six weeks ago.

Photo courtesy of Jose Guadalupe Martinez

The largest march in Seattle history took place on Saturday, January 21. Listen here to the speeches you may have missed at the Seattle Womxn’s March, because over 100,000 demonstrators can’t fit in Judkins Park.

Once more, the National Mall has swelled with demonstrators.

Just a week after President Trump's inauguration at the Capitol and six days after the Women's March on Washington, abortion-rights opponents were raising their voices in the nation's capital. The annual rally they call the March for Life attracted demonstrators from across the country Friday.

R
Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

One of Donald Trump's first acts as president was to restrict access to abortion.

On Monday, he reinstated the so-called "Mexico City Policy," which forbids the US from funding any group that provides or promotes abortion overseas. The policy dates back to the Reagan era, was repealed by President Bill Clinton, reinstated by President George W. Bush and rescinded once more by President Barack Obama — before being reinstated on Monday.

Aneelah Afzali speaking at Womxn March Seattle in Judkins Park
Courtesy of Jack Storms

Bill Radke talks to Aneelah Afzali, executive director of MAPS-AMEN (American Muslim Empowerment Program), about how marchers at Saturday's Womxn March can continue to stay politically and socially involved. Afzali was one of the speakers at the march in Seattle. She has provided an action sheet for those interested in combating Islamophobia

Donna Dean-Wright holds a sign at the Seattle women's march on Saturday, January 21, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Editor's note: Some protest signs may be a little too, er, brazen for some.

“There will be hell toupée.”

“Hell yes, we’re ovary-reacting.”

“Golden rule not golden showers.”


Pink hats dotted the Capitol lawn in Olympia Saturday morning as demonstrators gathered for a rally and march. It was one of dozens across the northwest coordinated with the march on Washington, D.C. the day after Donald Trump's inauguration.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The National Mall has flooded with pink, as demonstrators descend on the nation's capital Saturday for the Women's March on Washington. Just one day after President Trump's inauguration, marchers from across the country have gathered in the city to protest his agenda and support for women's rights.

The event opened with a rally, to be followed by the march proper — which had a path laid out from a starting position near the U.S. Capitol to its endpoint near the Washington Monument.

Dear Mom. Get your boa. It's time to f**king march

Jan 20, 2017
David Schmader wrote The Stranger's "Last Days" column for 15 years.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Hello Mom!

By the time you read this, I’ll be en route from Seattle to Norfolk, where you and I will meet up, load up your car, and drive to D.C. for Saturday’s Women’s March. As you know, we’ll be staying at cousin John’s place in the D.C. suburb of Olney — a half-hour train ride to D.C.’s Union Station and the march site. (As you may not know or precisely remember because I sure did not, John and Katie’s kids are Maddie and Patrick, John’s siblings are Beth, Diane and Amy, and I’m guessing a third of these people have spouses who also have names? I’m bringing flash cards. We can run them on the road.)

People at a women's march on Seattle's Capitol Hill on Dec. 3.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Seattle’s mommy networks lit up this week with a question: Is it safe to bring our babies to the Womxn’s March on Saturday?

Ijeoma Oluo
Courtesy of Ijeoma Oluo

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle-based writer Ijeoma Oluo about why she's not attending or speaking at the Womxn's March in Seattle Friday. 

The abortion rate in the United States fell to its lowest level since the historic Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision legalized abortion nationwide, a new report finds.

The report by the Guttmacher Institute, a research group that supports legalized abortion, puts the rate at 14.6 abortions per 1,000 women of childbearing age (ages 15-44) in 2014. That's the lowest recorded rate since the Roe decision in 1973. The abortion rate has been declining for decades — down from a peak of 29.3 in 1980 and 1981.

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