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women

Even the most commonplace devices in our world had to be invented by someone.

Take the windshield wiper. It may seem hard to imagine a world without windshield wipers, but there was one, and Mary Anderson lived in that world.

In 1902, Anderson was visiting New York City.

Jacinta Morales learned she was pregnant after she was processed into ICE detention. She said she was happy to be pregnant.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

She wears a yellow uniform, loose, with a sweatshirt underneath. Her long hair, braided in tight cornrows near her temples. Her handshake, timid.

We talk in a small meeting room at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, with her attorney and an interpreter.


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Courtesy of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.whattookyousolong.org/">What took you so long</a>

Nasra Hussain Ibrahim was 11 when she realized she’d have to do something drastic if her family was to survive.  

They lived in Hiiraan, a rough region in south-central Somalia where al-Shabaab, a hard-line, al-Qaeda-linked group, and local clans clash. The militants force children to fight, they take over and shutter schools and rape and force girls to marry fighters, while imposing a warped, violent version of Islam. Those who don’t obey face execution by stoning.  

Octavia Butler used to say she remembers exactly when she decided to become a science fiction writer. She was 9 years old and saw a 1954 B-movie called Devil Girl from Mars, and two things struck her. First: "Geez, I can write a better story than that!" And second: "Somebody got paid for writing that story!" If they could, she decided, then she could, too.

It has been 80 years since Amelia Earhart vanished while trying to become the first female pilot to fly around the world, and her 1937 disappearance has become one of the great mysteries of our time.

Joni Balter and Cathy Allen.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Why hasn’t Seattle had a woman mayor since 1928, when Bertha K. Landes was in office?

(Her slogan: Municipal Housecleaning.)

Advocates for ending child marriage are trying a new tactic: Show governments just how much the practice is hurting their own bottom line.

In many ways, parenting newborns seems instinctual.

We see a little baby, and we want to hold her. Snuggle and kiss her. Even just her smell seems magical.

Many of us think breast-feeding is similar.

"I had that idea before my first child was born," says Brooke Scelza, an evolutionary anthropologist at the University of Los Angeles, California. "I definitely thought, 'Oh, I'm going to figure that out. Like how hard can it be?' "

Santa Anigo, 30, poses for a portrait during a rally at Westlake Park on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Seattle, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

On Sunday morning, two Seattle police officers responded to a reported burglary. That call ended in the fatal shooting of Charleena Lyles, an African-American mother of four.

Just days after, black women in the city are feeling the impact. 

baby kid
Flickr Photo/Tamaki Sono (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/224maX

Bill Radke speaks with artist, poet and mother of two, Natasha Marin, about the realization that she didn't have to become a mother. She says motherhood seemed like something she was always just supposed to do.

Radke also speaks with poet and curator Imani Sims about her decision to not have any kids.

Marin's story and this conversation on motherhood first appeared in an article by the Seattle Times.

Two years ago, Eqbal Dauqan was going to work in the morning as usual. She's a biochemistry professor. And was driving on the freeway, when suddenly: "I felt something hit my car, but I didn't know what it was because I was driving very fast," she says.

Dauqan reached the parking lot. Got out of the car and looked at the door. What she saw left her speechless.

"A bullet hit the car, just on the door," she says.

The door had stopped the bullet. And Dauqan was OK. She has no idea where the bullet came from. But it turned out to be an ominous sign of what was to come.

This is why I nursed my baby on the Seattle bus

Jun 10, 2017
The author with her son at their home in Seattle's Greenwood neighborhood.
Krista Welch for KUOW

At the back of the Metro bus, we did something unusual: We talked to one another. Among us was a woman who had her toddler son with her — we smiled and waved at him as he asked his mom 20 questions about the world. Then, unexpectedly, he moved close to her, pulled on the collar of her shirt and pulled her boob out for a quick snack.

Megan Farmer / KUOW

Bill Radke talks with Dr. Willie Parker about how to have an honest disagreement about abortion.

Washington state Rep. Judy Warnick applauds after the capital budget is adopted as the last bill of the 2013 session
Flickr Photo/Washington State House Republicans (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/eZUQFW

It was time for Emily Harrington to make a choice.

Harrington is a professional climber. In 2014, she was trying to reach the top of the tallest peak in Southeast Asia, a little-known mountain called Hkakabo Razi that had been successfully climbed only once before.

Twitter War vets Lindy West and Scaachi Koul at SPL
KUOW Photo/John O'Brien

Scaachi Koul, a Toronto-based writer, didn’t hold back when speaking in Seattle recently.

For starters, she thinks all non-savory pies are gross — especially America’s beloved apple pie.

“Hot stewed fruit? Bad. Bad. I don’t get it,” Koul said.

Hidden in green hills east of South Korea's capital is the House of Sharing, a nursing home for elderly women.

It's a bright, spacious place. But its residents are survivors of a dark chapter of history.

"It was 1942 and I was only 15, running an errand for my parents [in our Korean hometown of Busan], when two Japanese men in uniform grabbed me by the arms and dragged me away," recalls Lee Ok-seon, now age 90. "That's how I became enslaved."

She was sent to work in a brothel in a Japanese-occupied area of northeast China.

'Passion in Red.'
CREDIT XANDRISS SINGLE LINE ARTIST HTTPS://FLIC.KR/P/N7B6V7 (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Claire Dederer’s book “Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning” is a memoir. But unlike “Wild” or “Eat, Pray, Love,” it’s not the kind of memoir where a woman of a certain age goes traipsing off into the unknown to start a new life.


A crowd of women in pink Planned Parenthood T-shirts surrounded Washington Gov. Jay Inslee Tuesday morning as he signed a bill to improve access to birth control.

At a town hall meeting in Willingboro, N.J., on Wednesday, U.S. Rep. Tom MacArthur was confronted by angry constituents who demanded to know how the Republican health care bill that he helped write would affect rape victims.

A young man named Joseph said he understood that the bill would allow insurance companies to deem rape a pre-existing condition and deny coverage to people who have been raped.

Mackenzie Tolliver and Elisha Edlen, players on the Seattle Majestics.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel speaks with two members of the undefeated women’s tackle football team the Seattle Majestics. Elisha Edlen and Mackenzie Tolliver discuss the difficulties in playing and promoting football for women while being overshadowed by the Seahawks (and the local lingerie football league). They also talk about how far the sport has come in recent years and encouraging signs that more and more women are learning that they too can play tackle football.

Sharayah Lane and baby Ian nursing moms of color
Krista Welch for KUOW

They were riding the D Line bus in Seattle when baby got hungry. Mom pulled out her boob.

For the first time in the U.S., two physicians and a medical office manager were indicted on charges stemming from the alleged female genital mutilation of two young girls, about six to eight years old, according to a Michigan U.S. Attorney's Office. Dr. Jumana Nagarwala, Dr. Fakhruddin Attar and Attar's wife, Farida, were indicted on April 26 for FGM, which has been illegal in the U.S. since 1996. The AP reported that Nagarwala's attorney, Shannon Smith, has denied the allegation, saying the doctor was performing a religious custom that didn't involve cutting.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We've been hearing stories about people adapting to a changing economy for our series Brave New Workers.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Do I still see myself as a cowboy? Yeah, I do, and I hope I always do.

Putting together a march on the National Mall is a demanding task, to put it mildly. And the organizers of the Women's March only had two months to put together an event that quickly grew from a Facebook post to a worldwide phenomenon.

"I think what's really interesting is we didn't necessarily have a lot of time to think about next steps," said activist Carmen Perez.

Seattle writer Ijeoma Oluo
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke talks to Ijeoma Oluo, local writer and editor at large of The Establishment, about her interview with Rachel Dolezal for The Stranger and why Oluo hopes it will be the last conversation she has on the topic. 

Here's the good news about young adults in the U.S. over the past four decades: More of them are working full time and year-round.

In 1975, close to 67 percent of adults from ages 25 to 34 were employed full time, and that share increased to 77 percent by 2016, according to a new report on young adults by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Chicago police have now arrested two suspects in the brutal sexual assault of a 15-year-old girl that was streamed on Facebook Live. Both of those charged in the attack are teenage boys, ages 14 and 15, and police continue to look for more accomplices.

About 40 people may have watched the rapes on Facebook as they happened, but none of them reported the crimes to the police. That's raising ethical and legal questions about those who witnessed the crime, including whether they can be charged for their inaction.

Alexes Harris, Sociology Professor at UW
Stacie Youngblood Photography

When Professor Alexes Harris learned she had a rare form of leukemia, she knew she was in a fight for her life. But she didn't realize how difficult it would be to find a bone marrow match as a woman of color. This is her story.

They're called "my wife," and it seems they've done it all: typed, transcribed and even researched for their scholar husbands.

And, through a hashtag that started last weekend, their work also started a conversation on the uncredited female labor in academia.

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