women | KUOW News and Information

women

KUOW Graphic/Brie Ripley

Do you know someone who is battling sexism at work? Someone who is smashing the patriarchy not just in their 9 to 5, but also in their neighborhood and all through cyberspace — and WINNING?

Tell us about them. And by them we mean she/her, he/him, they/them. Oh, it’s YOU? Tell us about your rad self, too.

In response to the #MeToo movement, the Washington state Senate will create a new human resources officer position to investigate complaints of harassment and other workplace misconduct, replacing a previous system of “facilitators” who served as a go-to resource for victims.

It took a long time for Andrea Valobra to realize something basic about her culture. She grew up knowing that women were expected to do certain duties that men didn’t have to do, like cleaning and cooking. But she didn’t understand the full extent of the machismo culture until she was in her teens.

Her first boyfriend raped her. Another hit and choked her.

She says her family explained it away.

"'He likes you, so he will rape you,'" she says. "'He loves you too much and that is why he has to control your phone.'"

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is not here for your interrupting nonsense.
Flickr Photo/Stanford Law (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/fYkEXZ

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is known for her fiery written dissents. But she might have honed that talent, in part, because she couldn't get a word in edgewise.


From left to right, U.S. Supreme Court, Associate Justices, Elena Kagan, Sonia Sotomayor, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, on stage during a Women's History Month reception at Statuary Hall on Capitol Hill, hosted by Democratic Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-CA., We
AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Listen to the beginning of this audio clip: 

Hear it? That’s Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy interrupting fellow Justice (a.k.a. the notorious) Ruth Bader Ginsburg during oral arguments.

Oh, didn’t hear Justice Bader Ginsburg? That’s because she barely got a chance to talk.

KUOW Illustration/Bond Huberman

Recently a KUOW editor received this text from a friend:

“What’s the best way to negotiate salary for a new job? Got an offer that’s a big raise for me, but I think she’ll go higher.”

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has electrified Democratic Party activists, not only by pulling off a major political upset in New York's 14th Congressional District primary this week but with her progressive politics, working-class roots, and background as a Latina.

Display with system code.
Flickr Photo/Yuri Samoilov (CC BY 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2N9a7jN

Bill Radke talks to Stuart Reges, principal lecturer at the University of Washington's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science about his essay, "Why Women Don't Code," saying women are underrepresented in computer science because of personal preferences. We're also joined by Nicole Buchanan, executive director of Ada Developers Academy.

In our conversation, Reges and Buchanan discuss what they see as the factors that do or do not lead women to go into computer science and tech, and the work they're both doing to bring women into the field and ensure they're supported.

Roxane Gay speaks at TEDWomen2015 - Momentum, May 27-29, 2015, Monterey Conference Center, Monterey, California, USA.
Flickr Photo/TED-Marla Aufmuth/TED (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ybtHLA

Recent polling shows that almost half of American women say they’ve been sexually assaulted.

With that startling statistic in mind, KUOW presents this talk with author Roxane Gay, who compiled a collection of personal essays called, “Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture.” It addresses a misogynistic culture in which victims of violence are often discredited, mocked or shamed for their assault.

wage gap BTSW
KUOW Graphic/Teodora Popescu; Source: AAUW

There isn't one wage gap all women experience. There are several. Allow us to demonstrate: 

Imagine this jar of 100 Skittles is how much a white cis male coworker — let's call him Gary — is being paid.

Saudi Arabia Lifts Ban On Female Drivers

Jun 24, 2018

Updated at 6:23 p.m. ET

Saudi Arabia lifted its widely criticized ban on female drivers on Sunday, sparking jubilation among many women in the country who went out on the roads shortly after the ban was lifted.

Talk show host and writer Samar Almogren told The Guardian, "I always knew this day would come. But it came fast. Sudden. I feel free like a bird."

Eula Scott Bynoe Jeannie Yandel
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Yes, your workplace is sexist.

The number of people dying by suicide in the United States has risen by about 30 percent in the past two decades. And while the majority of suicide-related deaths today are among boys and men, a study published Thursday by the National Center for Health Statistics finds that the number of girls and women taking their own lives is rising.

Young women, especially young women of color, tend to get less exercise than their male counterparts, and the disparities worsen after high school ends.

This is the finding of a study published Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

Mazie Hirono used to be known as the "good girl" of Hawaii politics.

She was seen as polite, never in-your-face, not a boat-rocker. But now, that view has changed.

As one Hawaii columnist put it, she is a "badass."

"I always was," Hirono said in an interview with NPR. "I just wasn't very noisy about it. I've been a fighter all my life. I just don't look like that."

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Miss America is waving goodbye to its swimsuit competition, scrapping one of its most iconic elements in an attempt to shift the annual ceremony's emphasis from its longtime focus on contestants' physical beauty.

Updated Tuesday, 10:03 a.m.

It's been the story since Trump was elected.

Dueling, massive crowds showed up in Washington in January 2017: on one day, supporters of the newly inaugurated president; and, the next, an enormous gathering of opponents for the Women's March, with largely women leading the resistance.

Updated at 9:10 p.m. ET

In the last race of her history-making career, Danica Patrick went out with a bang — but not the bang she'd hoped.

At the Indianapolis 500 on Sunday, Patrick crashed as she came out of Turn 2.

During lap 68 of the race, Patrick lost control and hit the outer wall before sliding across the track, hitting the interior wall and finally coming to a stop on the grass, the Associated Press reports.

Updated 2:19 p.m. ET

The people of Ireland voted overwhelmingly to repeal its restrictive abortion ban by changing the country's constitution.

The results were announced Saturday evening, local time: Out of the more than 2 million people who participated in Friday's referendum to overturn the Eighth Amendment, which bans nearly all abortion in the socially conservative country, 66.4 percent voted for repeal and 33.6 percent voted against it.

For the first time in its 226-year history, the New York Stock Exchange has named a woman to lead the organization. Stacey Cunningham will succeed Thomas Farley to become the NYSE's 67th president on Friday, according to Intercontinental Exchange Inc.

There was exactly one sink in my first New York apartment, which also featured a bathtub in the kitchen and a toilet tucked away by itself in a room smaller than many closets. It was fine for a person living alone, but when my roommates returned, well, the dishes — from which there was never an escape — piled up fast.

Updated at 9:15 a.m. Thursday.

When an NBA team interviews potential head coaches, it's a big deal on sports sites and the fan blogs. It gets a write-up in the hometown paper.

It's not usually headline news at the New York Times, The Washington Post, Vogue and Salon.

Samantha Blackwell was working her way through a master's degree at Cleveland State University when she found out she was pregnant.

"I was 25, in really good health. I had been an athlete all my life. I threw shot put for my college, so I was in my prime," she says with a laugh.

McMorris Rodgers speaking at the 2015 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington, D.C.
Wikimedia/Gage Skidmore

Bill Radke speaks to Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers about #MeToo, her push to get more women in the U.S. House, and her legislation to protect the Columbia and Snake River dams. She spoke with us from Eastern Washington.

Editor's note: This interview contains language that some readers may find offensive.

Updated 3:55 p.m. ET

A woman who worked as an NBC correspondent says longtime network anchor Tom Brokaw made unwanted advances, including groping her and trying forcibly to kiss her, some two decades ago. Brokaw denied the claims in a email to his colleagues on Friday.

Linda Vester, who covered the Middle East and Africa for NBC and later joined Fox News, was in her 20s at the time she alleges Brokaw made the advances, Variety magazine reports.

Seattle Seahawks Sea Gals cheerleaders perform during halftime of an NFL football game Sunday, Oct. 29, 2017, in Seattle. The gloves were part of the Seahawks and NFL football's Crucial Catch campaign to support the fight against breast cancer.
AP Photo/Stephen Brashear

NFL cheerleading is being scrutinized after a professional cheerleader sued the New Orleans Saints. Her discrimination complaint comes on top of reports about rules dictating cheerleader behavior.

A record number of women — 309 — had filed to run for the U.S. House as of April 6. That's a nearly 90-percent increase over 2016's numbers.

That wave of women candidates has sent the share of candidates who are women skyrocketing...to 22 percent.

Employers can't pay women less than men just because they made less at a previous job, a federal appeals court has ruled. The continuing gender pay gap is "an embarrassing reality of our economy," the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said in its opinion.

The court said a woman's prior salary, whether considered on its own or along with other factors, can't be used to justify paying a female employee less than her male counterpart. To do so perpetuates discrimination, the court's majority opinion said.

Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

Following the #MeToo movement, men say they're having a difficult time interacting with women in the workplace. That's according to a new Pew Research Center survey. New York Times columnist Lindy West calls B.S. on that — and has some tips for men at work. 

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