wildlife

This summer, the Huckleberry wolf pack killed more than 30 sheep in northeastern Washington. Wildlife officials then authorized the killing of up to four wolves. A sharp shooter accidentally killed the pack’s alpha female.

The idea behind the kill order: taking out wolves with a habit of preying on livestock will protect cattle and sheep.

Federal wild horse specialists from Idaho and Oregon have been trained in how to shoot birth control darts into the rumps of wild horses.

The struggling theme park chain SeaWorld announced plans today to enlarge and improve the killer whale tanks at three of its parks.

The renovations will begin at the San Diego SeaWorld in 2015, where the total water volume in the killer whale environment will double to 10 million gallons and include a “fast water current” for the whales to swim against.

Washington Wildfires Displace Deer

Aug 15, 2014

Wildfires have ravaged more than a million acres across the Northwest. In central Washington, the burned landscape will leave one of the state’s largest deer herds without a place to go this winter, when deer like to eat bitterbrush and chokecherry.

Those shrubs will be hard for deer to find this year – with 25,000 acres of habitat scorched by fire, including parts of five wildlife areas.

Oregon's Wandering Wolf May Have Met His Mate

May 13, 2014

Oregon's famous lone wolf isn't so lonely anymore.

Biologists say it appears the wandering wolf OR-7 has found himself a mate.

Their evidence came from trail cameras set up in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in Southern Oregon.

The cameras captured an image of a black wolf in the area where they've been tracking OR-7 with a GPS collar. Then they captured an image of that same wolf squatting to pee.

The death of a beloved red-tailed hawk in Cambridge, Mass., has drawn attention to the issue of how rat poison is affecting wildlife.

Veterinarians say the hawk likely died from eating a rodent that consumed rat poison. Local birdwatchers had followed the exploits of the hawk and her mate, which they named Ruby and Buzz, for years.

Oregon's top elected officials got behind a controversial plan Tuesday to sell off pieces of the south coast's Elliott State Forest to private interests.

Gov. John Kitzhaber described the move as testing the water for a future deal to move the rest of the Elliott into private ownership, potentially in the hands of a conservation group.

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Hedgehogs, glow worms and birds that mate on the wing give a unique British flavor to this story of urban wildlife.
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Any animal organization can call itself a sanctuary, and many do. But only a few of those groups go through the American Sanctuary Association’s rigorous certification process.

Seattle Animal Control

A rattlesnake is something that you’re not supposed to see in Seattle. But one was spotted this week around North 120th and Fremont Avenue North, sunning itself on a rock wall.  Don Jordan, director of the Seattle Animal Shelter says an animal control officer was able to bag it and take it back to the shelter.

Northwest Scientist Discovers Unlikely Father

Jun 13, 2013
Gudrun Ongman

There are lots of great dads out there. Not all of them are human. Lissa Ongman is an animal scientist who grew up in Woodinville, Wash. She's known two great models of fatherhood in her life. One was her own dad. The other came from a place she never expected.

Courtesy Jason Knight/Alderleaf Wilderness College

Part of the lure of the Northwest is the proximity to wilderness areas to hike, snowshoe and camp in. But every year dozens of people hiking in Mt. Rainier National Park get lost or injured, requiring the help of search and rescue teams. Jason Knight is a co-founder of Alderleaf Wilderness College and program director of the Wilderness Certification Program. He talks with Ross Reynolds and answers listener questions about what you should know before you journey into Washington's wilderness. Below are some highlights from the interview. 

COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho - The protected status of a small population of reindeer in the Northwest is getting a second look. Snowmobilers and an Idaho county that depends on winter snow sports petitioned the government to delist the animal.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agreed to do a status review on woodland caribou in the Selkirk Mountains of Idaho and Washington. They’re part of a larger herd from Canada.

Washington Considers Another Impact Of Wolves: Skinny Cows

Oct 31, 2012

Washington ranchers who can show that wolves are making their cattle lose weight could get reimbursed under a new proposal. The rule before the Fish and Wildlife Commission would expand a compensation program for ranchers living in wolf country.

Washington’s cattle ranchers aren’t the first to complain about skinny livestock. Ranchers in Idaho and Oregon also say the reintroduction of wolves has made sheep and cattle move more and eat less.

That translates into the bottom line, says Dave Ware. He’s the game manager with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Pink Dolphins In The Trees

Oct 5, 2012
Pink dolphins swim among flooded trees.
(Photo: Kevin Schafer)

The Amazon River is home to a creature that looks like it was conjured out of a dream: pink river dolphins. They have long, toothy snouts, and adult males can turn bubblegum pink. But what really makes these creatures unique is their habitat. When the Amazon River floods each year, the surrounding forest fills with water. The dolphins are free to swim where no other dolphins do: among the tops of trees.