weather

A powerful typhoon in North Korea has caused devastating floods, killing more than 130 people and displacing at least 100,000, according to United Nations agencies.

Typhoon Lionrock struck North Korea about two weeks ago. It triggered floods that have left at least 138 people dead and some 400 others missing, the U.N. resident coordinator's office says.

What kind of weather might the Northwest be in for this fall and winter? Well, one meaningful clue came when federal forecasters at the National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center Thursday dropped their "La Niña Watch.”

People walk along sun-baked University Way Northeast in Seattle on Friday.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

If you're dripping with sweat during this heat spell, you can blame Canada (kind of).

Washington state climatologist Nick Bond told KUOW's Kim Malcolm that warm air is flowing down from the northeast, contributing to this hot weather.

Wikimedia Commons/Project Gutenberg/U.S. public domain

Last summer, the temperature reached 97 degrees in my toddler son’s bedroom.

We live in Seattle, where few homes have air conditioning, and we’re locals, so we were totally freaking out.

Beach-goers soak up the sun in view of the Puget Sound and Olympic mountains behind during a likely third day in a row of record high temperatures Tuesday, April 19, 2016, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

People may wonder when Seattle will get the 90 degrees days that were common over the last couple summers. Where's that hot weather?

The first weeks of August are typically the hottest all year in Seattle. But the clouds above will tell you, we're not breaking any records this week.

Taiwan is bracing for Super Typhoon Nepartak, expected to make landfall early Friday.

The typhoon bearing down on the island has winds of more than 165 mph, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, and is classified as a category 5 storm.

The limbs of Central Washington’s cherry trees are heavy with ripe fruit. In Moxee, crews are scrambling to bring in a harvest while the skies are clear and the weather is dry.

This year's extra-large El Nino weather pattern is over, according to federal meteorologists.

"We're sticking a fork in this El Niño and calling it done," National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists wrote on a blog tracking the 15-month-long weather event.

FLICKR PHOTO/JEFF GUNN (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/cK6v3o

Emily Fox talks with Washington state climatologist Nick Bond about what recent warm weather in the Puget Sound region means for temperatures, drought and wildfires this summer.


Early this winter, skiers in the Northwest were excited. But then after about Christmas things turned dour. The once-epic snowpack is now long gone. In Washington state, it melted down in record time to less than half of average for early June.

And there hasn’t been much rain this spring either. The Cascades, Olympics and Blues are all hurting.

Beach-goers soak up the sun in view of the Puget Sound and Olympic mountains behind during a likely third day in a row of record high temperatures Tuesday, April 19, 2016, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Another hot summer is ahead for Washington. The National Weather Service predicts the entire nation will have higher than average summer temps, especially in coastal states.

The weather service says Washington and Oregon have a 50-60 percent probability of well above average temperatures this summer. It's the same prediction for Alaska and the northeast. 


This year's Atlantic hurricane season is expected to be "near-normal," the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says. The season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30.

About three feet of snow covered the summit of Chinook Pass in 2015. That was an exceptionally light snow year for Washington.
WSDOT blog

The unusually warm spring has let gardeners do some early planting, but it signals problems ahead for Washington farmers. The warm weather is causing snow in the mountains to melt faster than normal.


The early heat wave across most of the Northwest is forecast to start winding down Wednesday. It might have felt nice while it lasted, but the unusual warmth --record-setting, in some cases-- compounded the rapid melting of the Northwest's precious mountain snowpack.

When winter officially ended last month, snow measurements showed near normal to above normal snowpack across the Northwest. In four short weeks though, the snowpack in Oregon, Washington and Idaho has significantly eroded.

Submerged subdivisions, impassable roads, overflowing creeks: For the second day in a row, Houston has been struggling to cope with disastrous flooding.

Nearly 18 inches of rain has fallen on parts of Houston and surrounding areas in the past two days, according to the Harris County Flood Warning System. The resulting floodwaters have reportedly led to the deaths of five people.

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