weather

The limbs of Central Washington’s cherry trees are heavy with ripe fruit. In Moxee, crews are scrambling to bring in a harvest while the skies are clear and the weather is dry.

This year's extra-large El Nino weather pattern is over, according to federal meteorologists.

"We're sticking a fork in this El Niño and calling it done," National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists wrote on a blog tracking the 15-month-long weather event.

FLICKR PHOTO/JEFF GUNN (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/cK6v3o

Emily Fox talks with Washington state climatologist Nick Bond about what recent warm weather in the Puget Sound region means for temperatures, drought and wildfires this summer.


Early this winter, skiers in the Northwest were excited. But then after about Christmas things turned dour. The once-epic snowpack is now long gone. In Washington state, it melted down in record time to less than half of average for early June.

And there hasn’t been much rain this spring either. The Cascades, Olympics and Blues are all hurting.

Beach-goers soak up the sun in view of the Puget Sound and Olympic mountains behind during a likely third day in a row of record high temperatures Tuesday, April 19, 2016, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Another hot summer is ahead for Washington. The National Weather Service predicts the entire nation will have higher than average summer temps, especially in coastal states.

The weather service says Washington and Oregon have a 50-60 percent probability of well above average temperatures this summer. It's the same prediction for Alaska and the northeast. 


This year's Atlantic hurricane season is expected to be "near-normal," the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says. The season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30.

About three feet of snow covered the summit of Chinook Pass in 2015. That was an exceptionally light snow year for Washington.
WSDOT blog

The unusually warm spring has let gardeners do some early planting, but it signals problems ahead for Washington farmers. The warm weather is causing snow in the mountains to melt faster than normal.


The early heat wave across most of the Northwest is forecast to start winding down Wednesday. It might have felt nice while it lasted, but the unusual warmth --record-setting, in some cases-- compounded the rapid melting of the Northwest's precious mountain snowpack.

When winter officially ended last month, snow measurements showed near normal to above normal snowpack across the Northwest. In four short weeks though, the snowpack in Oregon, Washington and Idaho has significantly eroded.

Submerged subdivisions, impassable roads, overflowing creeks: For the second day in a row, Houston has been struggling to cope with disastrous flooding.

Nearly 18 inches of rain has fallen on parts of Houston and surrounding areas in the past two days, according to the Harris County Flood Warning System. The resulting floodwaters have reportedly led to the deaths of five people.

A tree fell on Sunday, March 14, 2016 on 112th Street Northeast, east of Forbes Creek Drive in Kirkland.
KUOW Photo/Kim Malcolm

Bill Radke speaks with Washington State climatologist Nick Bond about some of the reasons behind the very active weather the region has been experiencing recently.

A man was killed on Sunday after a tree fell on his station wagon. A female toddler in the car was transported to Harborview with minor injuries.
Seattle Fire Department

A man was killed on Sunday after a windstorm pushed a large pine tree onto his car. He had been driving a navy blue station wagon in the upper loop of Seward Park.

A couple winters ago, a team of Northwest scientists jumped in a pickup and traveled hundreds of miles around the U.S. and Canadian backroads. They were after samples of dirty snow.

Praying for rain? You'll get (slightly) less when the moon is very high, a new study finds.

Scientists at the University of Washington say the moon's position impacts the amount of rainfall on Earth.

"As far as I know, this is the first study to convincingly connect the tidal force of the moon with rainfall," researcher Tsubasa Kohyama says in a press release from the university.

Forgive us if you've heard this (and heard it, and heard it) already: The East Coast is getting its fair share of snow this weekend.

If you have, chances are you've also heard another little anecdote. When folks get snowed in for a couple of days — the urban legend goes — the population in that area is likely to see a boost in births just nine months later. In other words: Blizzards might be prime baby-making time.

“I don’t know what you would call it, Code Orange or just full on panic, but just sitting here and listening to the radio and watching television, you hear about the power outages, downed wires, ‘stay inside.’

"You know by all means if you leave your home you will die! That's seems to be the message here.”

That's veteran Moscow reporter Charles Maynes, who happens to be in Washington, DC just as the dangerous winter storm named Jonas by the National Weather Service was striking the capital.

In Moscow, he says, people may be a bit more snow resilient.

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