war

The hunt for ISIS's European mastermind

Mar 25, 2016
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BBC

This week's devastating attacks in Brussels, in which more than 30 people died and scores were injured, are the latest phase of the war on Europe declared by the so-called Islamic State.

The attacks cast a dark shadow over last week's triumph, the arrest of Salah Abdeslam.

The hope will be that Abdeslam, one of the leading members of the cell behind the Paris attacks, will provide crucial intelligence on the current state of ISIS' network and its future plans.

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Marco Werman

On a street in my Cambridge neighborhood is an early model mini-van that belongs to some septuagenarian hippies.  On it was a bumper sticker that has since peeled off that in essence read, “War is the worst of all possible options.” It had been on the car since the lead-up to the second Iraq invasion in 2003.

That same idea emerged in the Tehran taxi that is the revenue stream for Mahmoud, the quiet man with a seemingly constant five-o’clock shadow. He was the driver for producer Matthew Bell and me during our seven days there.

When South Sudan gained independence in 2011, there was great optimism both inside and outside of the country that it was putting its deeply troubled past behind it.

For generations, the South Sudanese had been terrorized by rebel armies and repressive government soldiers. At independence, South Sudan was one of the poorest nations in sub-Saharan Africa but also one of its most oil-rich.

The honeymoon for the world's newest nation didn't last long. Late in 2013 the president and vice president took up arms against each other. And things went downhill fast from there.

As soon as I walk into the squalid, unofficial migrant camp known as "the Jungle," outside the northern French city of Calais, I meet Amran, a 13-year-old Afghan boy staying here on his own.

At a rehabilitation center in Turkey, just over the border from Syria, Bassam Farouh raises and lowers leg weights, wincing and holding onto a rail.

The gray-haired Farouh is a Syrian rebel fighter who battled Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's army for years, until he was wounded in a Russian airstrike on his hometown across the border two months ago.

"It wasn't a war at first, it was a revolution against the system," he says. "We were trying to take a stance against the system and that led us here."

Syrian refugees Yazan Al-Salkini, 19, center, and brother Nabil, 14, left, hand out water to the homeless in downtown Seattle.
KUOW photo/Liz Jones

The debate about resettling Syrian refugees has some people asking, “Why don’t we use that money on homeless veterans instead?”

We asked homeless veterans in downtown Seattle what they thought.

Speaking from the Roosevelt Room of the White House, President Obama said on Thursday that slowing down the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan is "the right thing to do."

"Afghan forces are still not as strong as they need to be," Obama said, so the United States will leave 9,800 troops in the country through most of 2016. By 2017, about 5,500 troops will remain in a few bases across the country.

Obama said that the U.S. mission in Afghanistan will remain focused on two non-combat objectives: to train Afghan forces and carry out counterterrorism operations against al-Qaida.

The international aid group Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières) is calling for an international investigation into what it calls a war crime in Afghanistan — Saturday's U.S. airstrikes that killed 22 people, including medical staff and patients at the organization's hospital in Kunduz.

A map shows where the Navy war training area could be located.
USDA Forest Service

The public has until the end of the week to weigh in on the Navy’s plan to create an electromagnetic warfare range.

The Pacific Northwest Electronic Warfare Range requires permits from the National Forest Service and the State Department of Natural Resources.

Credit Wikimedia Commons

When the Americans entered World War II in 1944, reporters joined their ranks. Women, however, were not allowed.

YouTube

Ross Reynolds speaks with film maker Don Sellers and Karen Matsumoto, the daughter of World War II hero Roy Matsumoto. 

Roy Matsumoto enlisted in the army to get out of a Japanese American internment camp. He went on to serve  as a translator for the Merrill’s Marauders behind enemy lines in the Burma and won a medal for outstanding bravery.

AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus

March 20 marks the 11th anniversary of the start of the Iraq War. Marcie Sillman talks with Ned Parker, Baghdad Bureau Chief for Reuters, about the state of the country today.

AP Photo/Khalil Hamra

Steve Scher talks with Edward Chaiban, UNICEF's director of Emergency Programmes, about how the conflict in Syria has affected the local children.

UNICEF recently released a report that stated at least 10,000 children were killed in the violence, and almost 3 million children in Syria and in neighboring countries are unable to go to school on a regular basis.

Inside The Real American War In Vietnam

Feb 6, 2014
Nick Turse's book "Kill Anything That Moves."

Steve Scher talks with author Nick Turse about his book "Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam." It is about a detailed account of the widespread sanctioned killings that took place during the Vietnam War.

Homelessness, Pigeons And Life After Injury

Aug 29, 2013

No Home To Go To: Stories From The Homeless And Poor

As many as 3.5 million people in the United States experience homelessness in a given year. We'll hear a few personal stories about homelessness. In 2007, Steve Scher talked with Lisa Gray-Garcia (aka Tiny), journalist, poet and founder of POOR Magazine and the Poor News Network, Neal Lampi, who was living in a transitional housing program, and Renee Gebre, then living at Seattle Union Gospel Mission’s Women and Children’s Shelter.
 

Pigeons: Rats With Wings Or Symbols Of Peace?

The pigeon used to be considered a symbol of peace and fertility. The birds were also a critical component of wartime communication. Yet, now people often consider them rats with wings. Steve Scher talks with Andrew Blechman, an award-winning journalist and author of “Pigeons: The Fascinating Saga of the World’s Most Revered and Reviled Bird,” as well as Dave Cheney from National Bird Control.

Life After Injury: Stories From American Soldiers

Thousands of American soldiers have served in Iraq and Afghanistan during the last decade. Many suffered physical injury as a result. Today we hear first hand stories from members of our military. Steve Scher talked with Lt. John Arthur, Capt. Jeremy McGuffey and Sgt. Christopher Hoyt about life after injury and coming home from war.

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