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voting

An early draft of the democracy vouchers Seattle Elections will send to residents in January 2017.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Seattle's Ethics and Elections Office is ramping up its alternative way for candidates to raise money. It's called the Democracy Voucher Program, and at least one candidate plans to participate.

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

The Wisconsin Elections Commission announced Friday that it would hold a statewide recount of the presidential vote. The move was in response to petitions from two candidates, the Green Party's Jill Stein and independent Rocky Roque De La Fuente.

Federal law requires that all recounts be finished 35 days after the election, which is Dec. 13. One or both of the candidates will be required to pay for the recount.

This election map is a lie. So we made new ones

Nov 18, 2016
Washington state presidential election results, 2016
KUOW graphic/Abe Epton

Maps lie because they simplify. They  lie in different ways, to show certain realities, and electoral maps are no different.

In places where there are few people, hundreds of square miles turn red or blue (but usually red) because those voters cast their ballots in a certain way.

For Kurt McGill, voting was easy. When registering to vote, he used the Bread of Life mission's address, which holds his mail. Not everyone finds it so simple, though.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Most people receive their election ballots in the mail at their homes. But how does voting work for people who don't have homes? 


The King County ballot has a stub at the top you must tear off.
KUOW Photo/Jim Gates

Voting is hard. Your ballot is packed with decisions – some tougher than others. You have to parse the wonk, find the right-colored pen and sweat over whether you actually need a postage stamp.

For King and Snohomish county voters, there’s one more step: You’re asked to tear a stub off the top of your ballot before placing it in the security envelope. Or else … what?

No, you don't need a stamp for your ballot

Oct 26, 2016
This ballot's stamp game is on point.
KUOW

Let’s repeat that, in case you skimmed over the headline: 

Your ballot will be counted even if you DO NOT affix a stamp to the envelope. 

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

In January, registered voters in Seattle will get something in the mail that no American has gotten before.

They’re called democracy vouchers, and the city will mail $100 worth of them to each Seattle voter.


Rashid Abdi registers to vote for the first time
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Amina Ahmed faces an uphill battle on a breezy Saturday morning in a neighborhood straddling Tukwila and SeaTac: She's running a voter registration drive.

Ahmed is up against power and influence in American politics. The wealthy have it. And they also vote at much higher rates.


Election officials are calling it a watershed year for voters in Washington. 

Roughly 4.2 million people are registered to vote, a record for Washington state. That represents 83 percent of all the people eligible to vote in Washington, according to an outside researcher and the Secretary of State.

Women's suffragists parade in New York City in 1917, carrying placards with signatures of more than a million women.
Wikimedia Commons

There was a time when voting wasn’t so boring.

History remembers those bygone voting days as a blast. Think the Suffrage movement, Civil Rights and pretty much all the 19th century (before women or people of color could vote, so not much of a party for them). But in the last decades, voting has become antiseptic and antisocial.

Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman Friday introduced a proposal that would allow election officials to verify the citizenship of voters in the state. It comes in response to questions about whether the suspect in a recent shooting near Seattle voted legally.

Ballot drop box in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Bill Radke speaks with Todd Donovan, political science professor at Western Washington University, about the low voter turnouts for Washington's August primaries. Donovan is also an elected council member in Whatcom County. 

Exercising the constitutional right to vote in Pakistan can sometimes come at a painful price. Fouzia Talib says she has become a social outcast overnight. People are abusing her with such ferocity that she has temporarily left home to seek refuge elsewhere.

Flickr Photo/Justin Grimes (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Estevan Munoz-Howard of Honest Elections Seattle about Seattle Initiative 122. If it makes the November ballot, voters would be asked to approve a property tax hike to pay for an election reform package that includes giving voters vouchers worth $100 to donate to their favorite candidates.

A bill that would move Idaho’s presidential primaries up two months, into March, passed the state Senate Tuesday.

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