veterans

The ferry pulls in to Friday Harbor, the only incorporated city in San Juan County, Wash. Veterans will often travel the hour-long ferry ride to reach VA services here.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This story is part of a three-part series about veteran benefits (Part 1 / Part 2).

For veterans in San Juan County, getting health care from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs almost always begins with an hour-long ferry ride.

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live.

VA Data Show Disparities In Veteran Benefits Spending

Jan 13, 2015

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This is the first of a three-part series about veteran benefits (Part 2 / Part 3).

Officer Andy Gould of Auburn, Washington. Gould, a veteran, says his military experience sometimes helps him establish rapport with other veterans
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

The computer screen in Officer Andy Gould’s patrol car rhythmically ticks off details of emergencies from dispatch.

Gould, a 25-year veteran of the Auburn Police Department, wraps up a burglary and gets called to a suspicious subject nearby. A 13-year-old has threatened to kill two people in the house with a baseball bat.

As Gould drives, text from the dispatchers scrolls up the screen. It tells him where to go for his next call, what the problem is — and whether the people involved have ever been in the military.

A federal audit of a 24-hour national hotline for homeless veterans found that callers didn’t always receive assistance or access to needed services.

The Office of the Inspector General said lapses in management and oversight at the call center led to more than 40,000 missed opportunities to help.

The imprint Ron Riveira's grandparents made on his life has been indelible. Ron, a hospice nurse in California, served as a Navy corpsman and a medic in the Marines. His grandmother and grandfather — a Korean War vet — helped raise him.

Ron remembers that his grandfather may not have said much, but his love for his wife was obvious. "They were a phenomenal couple," Ron tells his friend Jason Deitch at StoryCorps in Concord, Calif.

YouTube

Ross Reynolds speaks with author and filmmaker Sebastian Junger about his latest project, “Last Patrol,” an HBO documentary about two soldiers and two war journalists hiking along 300 miles of  railroad tracks from Washington, D.C. to Pennsylvania.

Junger is an American journalist and author of the best-selling book "The Perfect Storm." In recent years he has chronicled stories of men at war in award-winning documentary films including "Restrepo."

Courtesy of David Tucker

When Major David Tucker deployed to Iraq – his third mission since he joined the Army Reserves in 1982 – he told his soldiers to take the doors off the Humvees.

Wounded In Afghanistan, But Still Running

Nov 11, 2014
AP Photo/Mary Schwalm

On Edward Lychik's 21st birthday, his fellow troops gave him a gift.

The Army combat engineer normally rode in the first truck in his convoy. Lychik's job was to ensure the road his battalion traveled in Afghanistan was bomb-free.

To celebrate Lychik's big day, his comrades let him ride in the rear — the convoy's last truck.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

The city of Auburn  hosted its 49th annual Veterans Day parade last Saturday. The event has grown significantly over the years. This year’s parade was a tribute to The Military Order of The Purple Heart. With 200 entries the parade stretched for more than a mile. Reporter Patricia Murphy was on scene to capture this audio postcard from the event. 

Hundreds of service members and civilians from various nations lined the road to the landing zone at NATO headquarters in Kabul. They had gathered to salute the two U.S. Marines and two U.S. Army soldiers participating in Operation Proper Exit.

Moments later, two Blackhawk helicopters swooped in, kicking up dust and debris. The four service members disembarked and walk past the cheering audience. One soldier walks with a subtle limp. One Marine has a prosthetic right arm, and the left is missing below the elbow.

(Stephen Brashear/AP Images for U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation

Thousands of veterans and service members preparing to leave the military are expected at Joint Base Lewis-McChord this week for a three-day summit.

More than a hundred veterans turned out for a town hall style meeting hosted by Veterans Administration Puget Sound as an effort to improve care at regional hospitals.

Ross Reynolds talks to Tacoma News Tribune military reporter Adam Ashton about an audit done on the Veteran Affairs medical centers that revealed schedulers manipulated wait times so it seemed that patients were not having to wait as long for health services.

Also, Rep. Denny Heck (D-Olympia) explains the new bill Congress passed to overhaul the VA.

Marcie Sillman talks with Joint Base Lewis-McChord's transition services manager, Robin Baker, about the programs the base offers to help veterans transition to civilian life. Also, we hear from Sgt. Richard Larimer about his upcoming entrance into the civilian sector for the first time.

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