U.S. Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to step in and stop gay marriages from taking place in Alabama. The move sent the strongest signal to date that the justices are on the verge of legalizing gay marriage nationwide. Within hours of the high-court ruling, same-sex marriages began taking place in Alabama, despite an eleventh-hour show of defiance by the state's chief justice.

The U.S. Supreme Court Friday agreed to take up cases challenging gay marriage bans in Michigan, Ohio, Tennessee and Kentucky.

A U.S. appeals court on Wednesday is scheduled to hear arguments on the constitutionality of a hotly contested abortion law in Texas. The measure mandates stricter building codes for clinics that perform the procedure, and Fifth Circuit judges in New Orleans will decide whether that poses an undue burden.

The Texas law — HB2 — requires clinics that perform abortions to operate like ambulatory surgical centers. Think wider hallways and hospital-style equipment — upgrades that could cost millions.

The U.S. Supreme Court has blocked enforcement of an Arizona law aimed at limiting use of the increasingly popular abortion pill. In 2012 nearly half of the abortions in the state were via the pill, known as RU-486.

The pill was approved by the FDA in 2000 for the first seven weeks of pregnancy. Since then, scientists have developed safer and smaller doses that allow the drug to be used through the ninth week.

Ross Reynolds talks with Richard Hollinger, a criminology professor at the University of Florida, about how retailers are protecting themselves from employees, who steal more than shoplifters do. Today, the Supreme Court rules that Amazon does not have to pay its warehouse workers for time spent waiting to go through security checks after their shifts.

Women's reproductive rights are once again before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. Only this time, pregnancy discrimination is the issue and pro-life and pro-choice groups are on the same side, opposed by business groups.

Marcie Sillman talks with U.S. Congressman Jim McDermott about the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decisions, President Obama's executive action on immigration policy, and a variety of other issues.

The U.S. Supreme Court delivered a major victory to gun control advocates on Monday. The 5-4 ruling allows strict enforcement of the federal ban on gun "straw purchases," or one person buying a gun for another.

The federal law on background checks requires federally licensed gun dealers to verify the identity of buyers and submit their names to a federal database to weed out felons, those with a history of mental illness and others barred from gun ownership.

In Miller v. Alabama, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that automatic life without parole for juvenile killers is unconstitutional.

One of the most watched issues before the Supreme Court this term may turn on the question of religious freedom. But it will also likely determine how women will be able to access a key provision of the Affordable Care Act – one seeking to guarantee no-cost prescription contraception in most health insurance plans.

Digging into the nitty gritty of immigration law, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that some immigrant children who turn 21 while their parents' immigration application is still pending have to go to the back of the line and start over.

The Associated Press explains:

"The justices on Monday sided with the Obama administration in ruling that immigration laws do not let children who age out of the system qualify for visas.

The U.S. Supreme Court won't block same-sex marriages in Oregon. The high court Wednesday turned down a request to halt gay marriages in the state.

The Supreme Court has ruled that a Michigan ballot initiative to ban racial preferences in college admissions is constitutional, overturning a lower court decision.

In a 6-2 decision Tuesday, the justices said the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals was wrong to set aside the voter-approved ban as discriminatory.

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Flickr Photo/Kjetil-Ree (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Marcia Coyle, chief Washington correspondent for the National Law Journal, about the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to reject funding limits in federal elections.

‘My Beloved World’ By Sonia Sotomayor

Mar 27, 2014
Sonya Sotomayor's book, "My Beloved World."

Sonia Sotomayor is the 111th justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. She’s also its first Hispanic and third female justice. In her memoir, “My Beloved World,” Sotomayor details her childhood struggle with diabetes, her family life and her drive to become a lawyer.

Sotomayor spoke at Town Hall on March 10, 2014. The talk was moderated by Eric Liu.

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