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University of Washington

Computer scientist and author Ramez Naam
Courtesy of Ramez Naam

Ross Reynolds interviews Seattle computer scientist and science fiction writer Ramez Naam about the latest technology in human enhancement.  Naam is the author of the 2010 book, “More Than Human: Embracing the Promise of Biological Enhancement."

Dr. Christian Sidor, Burke Museum curator of vertebrate paleontology, right, holds Washington’s first dinosaur fossil to compare it with the cast of a femur of another theropod dinosaur held by  Brandon Peecook, University of Washington graduate student.
Burke Museum

A large bone from a two-legged, meat-eating dinosaur has been discovered in the San Juan Islands – the first dinosaur fossil ever found in Washington state.

Researchers found the fossil by accident. In 2012, they were in Sucia Island State Park collecting sea creature fossils when they stumbled on a bone that looked unusual for that area.

A month later they returned to the site with paleontologists. Initially, Professor Christian Sidor of the Burke Museum didn’t believe it belonged to a dinosaur.  

But one feature of the bone convinced Sidor, a professor of biology at the University of Washington and vertebrate curator at the Burke Museum: “The muscles that actually attach to the back of the leg and retract the femur attach here. So this structure, the shape of it, and how close it is to the head of the femur tell us that this is a carnivorous dinosaur. All dinosaurs have this feature.”  

The scientists don’t know what kind of dinosaur the bone comes from, however, because there’s only a third of the bone. Sidor said it’s likely a therapod, which includes Tyrannosaurus rex, birds and Velociraptors. And they are pretty sure it is from the Late Cretaceous period and is about 80 million years old.

Protesters hold signs around a table populated by UW Regents.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds talks to Taylor Kuykendall, a coal reporter for SNL Energy, about the University of Washington's decision to divest from thermal coal.  

Student Lorena Guillen shows her support for the UW Board of Regents, which on Thursday voted to purge the UW's endowment fund of investments in "thermal coal," a type of coal used in power plants that's associated with higher pollution levels.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The University of Washington’s Board of Regents voted Thursday night to sell off its investments in thermal coal -- the kind of coal used to generate power.

It’s only the fourth time the university has “divested” its endowment – the other issues were South Africa, tobacco and Sudan.

Student activists Angela Feng, Sarra Tekola and Alex Lenferna of Divest UW appear before the UW Board of Regents on March 12, 2015 to urge the university to get rid of its coal investments.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

David Hyde speaks with Vox.com writer David Roberts who says student activists at the UW and elsewhere are changing the debate about climate change by making it a moral issue.

File photo of students playing basketball.
Flickr Photo/Nick Hubbard (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Dr. Jonathan Drezner, director of the University of Washington Medicine Center for Sports Cardiology, about sudden cardiac arrest and a new law to help protect Washington's student athletes.

The University of Washington's Intellectual House.
Screenshot from YouTube

Jeannie Yandel talks with Ross Braine, the University of Washington's tribal liaison, about his big dreams for the University's brand new Intellectual House, a space for Native Americans on campus.

UW To Give Minority Law Students A Helping Hand

Apr 16, 2015
University of Washington Law School
Flickr Photo/Eric E Johnson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Kellye Testy, dean of the University of Washington Law School, about their Gregoire Fellows program. The program aims to boost diversity in the law school and the legal profession.

A department at UW uses reverse engineering to improve flight technology based on nature.
Flickr Photo/Steve Edwards (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Tom Daniel, director of the University of Washington Air Force Center of Excellence on Nature-Inspired Flight Technologies and Ideas, about how reverse engineering biology can improve flight technology.

University of Washington's Suzzallo Library.
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1jp5e6Q

Ross Reynolds talks with University of Washington spokesperson Norm Arkans about Seattle's $15 minimum wage and why the UW is not ready to commit to it. 

Editor’s note: KUOW is a self-sustaining service of the University of Washington. Arkans is an ex-officio member of the Puget Sound Public Radio Board of Directors. 

More than 10 million Americans have trouble distinguishing red from green or blue from yellow, and there's no treatment for colorblindness.

A biotech company and two scientists hope to change that.

Student activists Angela Feng, Sarra Tekola and Alex Lenferna of Divest UW appear before the UW Board of Regents on March 12, 2015 to urge the university to get rid of its coal investments.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Student activists at the University of Washington urged the Board of Regents on Thursday to dump the university's investments in coal.

University Of Washington Ranked Best In The West For Value

Mar 9, 2015
University of Washington's Suzzallo Library.
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1jp5e6Q

Kim Malcolm talks with Paul Glastris, editor-in-chief of the Washington Monthly, about the University of Washington topping the "best bang for the buck" list for Western schools in "The Other College Guide."

Ana Mari Cauce
Courtesy of University of Washington

Ross Reynolds speaks with Ana Mari Cauce, the University of Washington's new interim president. Cauce has been at the University for 29 years and talks about what the board of regents instructed her to do in her interim role and how her training in psychology helps her.

Suicide is the third leading cause of death for adolescents and young adults, and those who live in rural areas are especially at risk.

For young people between the ages of 10 and 24, the suicide rates in rural areas are nearly double those of urban areas, according to a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. And that disparity is growing.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Early warnings for earthquakes already occur in Japan, and they’re being piloted in California. Now the University of Washington hopes to bring them to the Northwest.

Ana Mari Cauce
Courtesy of University of Washington

The University of Washington has named its new interim president. As KUOW’s Sara Lerner reports, Ana Mari Cauce is a veteran of the institution.

Signs at the Seahawks' Virginia Mason Athletic Center welcome home the team after the depressing Super Bowl Loss on Feb. 1, 2015.
Flickr Photo/Dena Michele Rosko

We expose you to just enough of the Seahawks' Super Bowl XLIX loss for your antibodies to fight it off. Also, why is the UW president leaving urban Seattle for the Aggies? Why do some rural Washington lawmakers want to split from the urban westside? Should I-405 include a thruway for the rich? And does Washington state need to save daylight?

KUOW’s Bill Radke analyzes the week’s news with author Sherman Alexie, Crosscut columnist Knute Berger and Northwest News Network managing editor Phyllis Fletcher.

Idaho lawmakers are considering a proposal to make more room for Idaho students in a University of Washington med school program.

Michael Young speaks at a cherry tree gift reception at the University of Washington on May 20, 2014.
Flickr Photo/University Marketing (CC-BY-NC-ND)

    

Ross Reynolds speaks with Washington state Sen. Barbara Bailey, chair of the Senate Committee on Higher Education, about University of Washington President Michael Young's surprise decision to leave and take the top job at Texas A&M University.

Amy Radil

In coming months, all patients in the University of Washington health system and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance will be asked for their permission to have medical records and leftover blood or tissue made available for future research.

Michael Young speaks at a cherry tree gift reception at the University of Washington on May 20, 2014.
Flickr Photo/University Marketing (CC-BY-NC-ND)

University of Washington president President Michael Young has a new job lined up: He's set to become the next president of Texas A&M University. The news came as a bit of a surprise to UW officials. 

KUOW's Kim Malcolm talked about why Young is leaving with Seattle Times higher education reporter, Katherine Long.

Manny has worked as a janitor at the UW for three years.  He says he makes about $14 an hour and would like a raise.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Janitors and custodians at the University of Washington plan to rally in the middle of campus Tuesday. Due to budget cuts, there’s now a smaller cleaning staff to cover the huge campus. Many janitors say they’re being asked to do more with less.

One of the most famous sights on the University of Washington Seattle campus is when the cherry trees bloom in the quad each spring.
Flickr Photo/Michael Matti (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington President Michael Young about the university's top priorities for the 2015 legislative session.

A small gathering at Red Square to discuss the events that have unfolded in Paris.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Several dozen students and Francophiles gathered in Red Square on the University of Washington campus on Friday in light of the tragic events that unfolded this week in Paris.

They formed a loose circle and discussed freedom of expression, what they love about France and how they were handling the news that two gunman had entered the offices of Charlie Hebdo magazine and killed 12 staffers. The gunmen died Friday after a standoff with police. 

Zachary Gian, an exchange student from France, said it has been hard to watch the news.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jackson Brown, manager of the University of Washington's e-sports team, the Purple Castor Mignons, about the team's big win in 2014 and how e-sports is making a splash on the Seattle campus.

One of the most famous sights on the University of Washington Seattle campus is when the cherry trees bloom in the quad each spring.
Flickr Photo/Michael Matti (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds takes a tour of the University of Washington campus with Antoinette Wills and John Bolcer, co-authors of the new book "The University of Washington," which tells the 119 year history of the campus through the buildings. They talk about a 1960s bombing at UW that remains a great unsolved mystery and the story behind the strange stone faces atop all the buildings in the liberal arts Quad.

Mary Guiden / UW

Marcie Sillman speaks with graduate student Elle O'Brien, who recently represented the University of Washington's Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering at the National Science Foundation's Perfect Pitch Competition, about making science comprehensible to everyone.

Ross Reynolds speaks with University of Washington spokesman Norm Arkans about hazing allegations at one of the college's fraternities, Beta Thea Pi.

Reynolds also talks with Caitlin Flanagan, author of article "The Dark Power of Fraternities," about what happens when the national headquarters of a fraternity investigates one of its chapters.

UW And WSU Face Off In The 'Apple Cup' Of Medical Schools

Sep 12, 2014

Marcie Sillman talks with Holly Greenwood, executive director of Washington's Rural Healthcare Collaborative, about what a medical school based in Spokane could do for the rural health care shortage.

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