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University of Washington

Last week, Izaic Yorks, a senior at the University of Washington, ran a mile in 3:53 — the fastest college mile ever by an American. The effort qualifies him for the Olympic trials this summer.

So why isn't Yorks running in the mile at this weekend's NCAA championships in Birmingham, Ala.?

Turns out, he had to make a decision: run that mile alone, or run with his team in the distance medley relay or DMR.

Flickr Photo/Indra Galbo (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/3GLm42

Among a long list of achievements, University of Washington professor Ralina Joseph co-founded the group WIRED (Women Investigating Race, Ethnicity, and Difference.)

The meaning and importance of the term "difference" is the focus of her recent lecture “What’s The Difference With ‘Difference?’”

More Hall Annex on UW campus. The building is an example of brutalism architecture.
Courtesy of Washington Trust for Historic Preservation/Jennifer Mortensen

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Chris Moore from the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation about the recent decision by the University of Washington's Board of Regents to replace More Hall Annex, a historic nuclear reactor on campus, with a new computer science building.

Moore is involved with an effort to add More Hall to Seattle's list of historic places, which could save it from demolition. The University of Washington has sued the city to stop that effort. A ruling is expected April 1.

Praying for rain? You'll get (slightly) less when the moon is very high, a new study finds.

Scientists at the University of Washington say the moon's position impacts the amount of rainfall on Earth.

"As far as I know, this is the first study to convincingly connect the tidal force of the moon with rainfall," researcher Tsubasa Kohyama says in a press release from the university.

studio record
KUOW Photo

Public radio listeners who oppose the sale of KPLU are getting a chance to try to raise the money necessary to buy the station. 

Bill Radke speaks with Geoff Baker, sports writer for the Seattle Times, about the University of Washington's decision to fire women's crew coach Bob Ernst.

We also hear from Dan Savage, editorial director of the Stranger, Melanie McFarland, journalist and TV critic, and Rob McKenna, former Washington state attorney general, about tough love from sports coaches and whether it helps or hurts athletes.

The George Washington statue on the University of Washington Seattle campus.
Flickr Photo/Chris Blakeley (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1jEzCcs

Bill Radke speaks with Dan Savage, editorial director of the Stranger, Melanie McFarland, journalist and TV critic, and Rob McKenna, former Washington state attorney general, about race relations on college campuses.

File photo of a flu shot.
Flickr Photo/Fort Meade (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1jxhkty

The University of Washington is opening a new center focusing on the immune system and how to fight a range of infections and autoimmune disorders.

The hope is to find therapies for infections like Ebola and dengue fever, as well as therapies for autoimmune disorders.

'Sesame Street' has included children and a new character with autism.
Screenshot from YouTube

Jeannie Yandel talks to Dr. Wendy Stone is a professor of psychology and director of the READi lab at the University of Washington. Dr. Stone was a consultant for Sesame Street as they created their first character with autism, Julia. Julia is also a character in their digital storybook, "We're Amazing, 1,2,3!"  

Chuck Lee, 73, goes in for dialysis three times a week. Each session takes four hours.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

For more than 600,000 patients living with end-stage kidney disease, dialysis is a lifesaver. But the blood-cleaning process keeps people attached to a large machine for hours multiple times per week.

What if there were a device they could just wear around?

Medical illustration of a heart.
Wikipedia Photo/Patrick J. Lynch/http://bit.ly/1Rr5Ovk

David Hyde speaks with UW medical researcher Dr. Chuck Murry about receiving a $10 million grant to begin human trials of a revolutionary new treatment for heart disease.  

Illustration of human heart and circulation.
Wikipedia Photo

UW Medicine is moving ahead with clinical trials to repair damaged hearts, thanks to a $10 million grant from a local foundation.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. When a person has a heart attack, one of the arteries gets blocked, often by a clot. Without oxygen, the heart muscle dies off pretty quickly.  

The computer drives containing sensitive information in a lawsuit against the CIA were taken from an office on the second floor of Smith Hall on the University of Washington campus, police say.
Flickr photo/Cody Logan (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Computer hardware holding sensitive information being used in a lawsuit against the CIA has been stolen, according to the University of Washington’s Center for Human Rights.

It’s common for patients to call or email Dr. Heather Evans with questions about their surgical wounds. Sometimes they even email photos.

But there’s no way to know for sure if something’s wrong without seeing the patient and the wound in person.

Jonathan Grant, Jon Grant
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Did a local developer ask a Seattle City Council candidate for a quid pro quo? (And how often does that happen around here?) Will the University of Washington's new top Dawg be more loyal than the last few? And why are Seattle Schools moving teachers around this far into the school year?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s top stories with Q13’s C.R. Douglas, Washington Policy Center’s Paul Guppy and Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter.

University of Washington's Suzzallo Library.
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1jp5e6Q

David Hyde talks to Jack Stripling, a reporter for The Chronicle of Higher Education, about the University of Washington's new president Ana Mari Cauce. 

New University of Washington president Ana Marie Cauce in the KUOW greenroom.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Ana Marie Cauce, newly selected president of the University of Washington, about her commitment to the school and her plans as its new leader.

Ana Mari Cauce
Courtesy of University of Washington

Ana Mari Cauce is the new president of the University of Washington. The university's board of regents made the announcement after a brief meeting Tuesday afternoon.

Kim Malcom sits down with Angelina Godoy, director of the University of Washington's Center for Human Rights, and UW law student Mina Manuchehri, a lead researcher at the Center. They discuss why the UW is suing the CIA over documents Manuchehri requested under the Freedom of Information Act about an alleged massacre in El Salvador. 

Flickr photo/sea turtle (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Seattle may be one of the country’s most progressive cities, but it falls short on services for elderly LGBTQ people, according to University of Washington researchers.

So they advise creating a new program to train health and human service providers in caring for older adults who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender.

University of Washington's Suzzallo Library.
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1jp5e6Q

New crime data showing sexual assault increasing at the University of Washington actually could be a sign of progress, according to a prevention expert.

Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.
Flickr Photo/Ryan Raffa (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1iMN9iL

Ross Reynolds talks to Emily Parkhurst, an editor for the Puget Sound Business Journal, about the University of Washington's new deal with Tsinghua University in Beijing to study clean energy technology.

A classroom at the University of Washington, 2012.
Flickr Photo/Emmett Anderson (CC BY NC)/http://bit.ly/1KFtI27

Ross Reynolds speaks with University of Washington biology lecturer Scott Freeman about how the traditional college instructional style -- think large halls with lots of students -- isn't the best method for teaching students.

He and others tried something different by including more interaction.  All the students did better with the changes, but women, minorities and low-income people particularly improved in the interactive environment. It's also been verified in subsequent research.

Mary Gates Hall, University of Washington
Flickr Photo/Nam-ho Park (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1iWcYg0

Ross Reynolds speaks with Amy Hagopian, an associate professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington, about why she's joined an effort to unionize faculty at the University of Washington.

Red Square, University of Washington campus
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1QnEFc7

David Hyde speaks with Norm Arkans, associate vice president of media relations and communications at the University of Washington, about why the UW administration has "grave reservations" about an attempt by some of the UW faculty to unionize.

Editor’s note: KUOW is a self-sustaining service of the University of Washington. Arkans is an ex-officio member of the Puget Sound Public Radio Board of Directors. 

Charles Corey of the University of Washington plays the chromelodeon, one of 57 instruments that composer Harry Partch created for his music.
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

The door to room 5 at the University of Washington School of Music is solid wood, nothing to distinguish it from other classrooms.

But inside this cramped space is a collection of unusual instruments, handcrafted to play one man’s music.

Zackery Lystedt sustained a permanent brain injury as a result of a football concussion he shook off at age 13. That was almost 10 years ago. Today, he's a spokesperson for concussion safety and the inspiration for the new UW institute.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Concussions are a big topic in sports these days. This year, the NFL has new rules that will let medical staff stop the game if they think they see a head injury. Now, the National Football League has given $2.5 million so the University of Washington can start up a new institute to study concussions.

Kayla Wheeler, right, visits the University of Washington's CoMotion MakerSpace.
Courtesy of University of Washington

What if the answer to one of humanities biggest problems was in the mind of someone who could not access the tools to solve it? 

The University of Washington's Access Engineering program is working towards a solution to that issue. They want more students with disabilities to study engineering, and that means getting their take on how to make makerspaces more accessible. 

Jeannie Yandel talks to Jack Stripling, a reporter for the Chronicle of Higher Education, about the University of Washington's search for a new president.

The window of opportunity to prevent grave ecological damage to our oceans from climate change is closing. That's according to a paper appearing Friday in the journal Science.

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