Trump and the Northwest | KUOW News and Information

Trump and the Northwest

Sarah Myhre’s a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Washington.
David Hyde / KUOW Photos

Nicole Baker is a research scientist at the University of Washington who studies the state of global fish stocks. It's not political work. In fact, she's never been an activist and has never participated in a political march in her life. 

But last year when Donald Trump ran for president, Baker got political for the first time. And she says in 2017, something snapped.


KUOW/John Ryan photo

Have you ever left a job where you were tempted to tell off your boss on your way out? After working for a quarter century at the Environmental Protection Agency, Michael Cox didn’t hold his tongue.


activists
Wenmei Hill

KUOW's politics team recently asked listeners: Has Donald Trump's election inspired you to get politically active for the first time? Here's a selection of responses we received. 

Attendees of the Mar. 4 Spirit of America Rally in Olympia, a pro-Trump event organized by Tacoma Narrows Tea Party coordinator Peggy Hutt (center) of Gig Harbor.
Photo courtesy Peggy Hutt

Donald Trump’s election galvanized a wave of activism on the left, including the women’s march that some political scientists say was the largest in American history.

Campaigners on the right say they’ve been energized by the election as well, even here in deep-blue Puget Sound.


People at a women's march on Seattle's Capitol Hill on Dec. 3.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

A new Republican president takes office. Half the nation is appalled.

But we're not talking about Donald Trump.


Kevin Tubbs and Pauli Bailey embrace different forms of activism.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

Embracing political activism can be tough on a relationship. Just ask Kevin Tubbs and Pauli Bailey. Both are liberals who felt a huge wake-up call from the presidential election.


Leslie Brown, an activist with Edmonds Neighborhood Action Coalition, shouted into a bullhorn to rally dozens of protesters gathered outside the Edmonds PCC, January 29, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke talks with Officer Kevin Stuckey, head of the Seattle Police Officers' Guild, about U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions' announcement of a wide-reaching review of federal consent decrees with police departments around the country.

The Seattle Police Department has been under a federal consent decree since 2012, after the Department of Justice found a pattern of excessive use of force in policing. 

Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

Attorneys general from 11 states are taking new action against the Trump Administration over energy efficiency standards. They are working to protect an Obama-administration rule they think is in jeopardy.

New efficiency standards for coolers and fans were supposed to go into effect by now. However, the Trump Administration has put them on hold until Sept 30.

An EnergyGuide sticker on a television includes the EnergyStar seal, meaning it's an efficient set.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

The Trump administration wants to end the EnergyStar program – you might know it from labels that mark the most energy-efficient appliances when you shop for a TV, refrigerator or computer.

Nives Dolsak and Aseem Prakash of the University of Washington told KUOW’s Emily Fox that ending the program doesn’t make sense, for a number of reasons.


President Trump promises coal workers their jobs will come back as he signs an executive order to scale back federal energy regulations.
EPA.gov

No one said the word “climate” on stage this week when President Trump signed an executive order aimed at scuttling the Clean Power Plan.

Christine Mathews says she couldn't afford health insurance without the ACA subsidies. She was at a rally last month outside  Congresswoman Suzan DelBene’s district office in Bothell.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

Supporters of Obamacare woke up Friday morning thinking they still needed to defend the law from Republican efforts to replace it.

As the political drama played out in the other Washington, a handful of advocates held signs outside Congresswoman Suzan DelBene’s district office in Bothell. They said they came to thank DelBene, a Democrat, for opposing the GOP legislation.

Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.
Starbucks press photo

The scene at Seattle’s McCaw Hall had the feel of a tent revival meeting. There was gospel music. "Lord, please let me go ... take me to the river, I want to go," Leon Bridges sang.

And there were testimonials — by employees, praising the policies and positions that Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz has taken.

KUOW/John Ryan photo

In a budget marked by deep cuts across most federal agencies, science and environmental programs took some of the biggest hits in President Donald Trump’s proposed spending plan released Thursday.

surgery
Flickr Photo/Army Medicine

Information was released this week about how the Republican health plan would affect people in Washington. UW associate law professor Sallie Sanford spoke with Kim Malcolm about who loses the most.

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