Trump and the Northwest | KUOW News and Information

Trump and the Northwest

Dozens of murals hang on the walls at the Northwest Detention Center. They're painted by detainees, and the designs must be approved by staff. Painting is also considered a voluntary job, and the artists are paid $1 per day for their work.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The policy changes came fast as President Donald Trump took office.

In Seattle, a city where roughly one in five people are immigrants, protests erupted. First, when Trump ordered a crackdown on so-called sanctuary cities for undocumented immigrants.

The Green River emerges from the Howard Hanson Dam. The Green River receives several smaller tributaries.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Washington environmental groups are criticizing the Trump Administration's push to rescind a federal clean water rule. The rule prevents polluters from dumping into small waterways that flow into larger lakes and rivers.

Screenshot from appropriations.house.gov

Both Democrats and Republicans pushed back against cuts proposed for the U.S. Department of Energy when Energy Secretary Rick Perry came to Capitol Hill on Tuesday.

Washington state Republicans criticized Trump administration proposals to lop one-fourth off efforts to clean up radioactive waste at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation and sell off much of the Northwest’s high-voltage power grid.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt
WH.gov

President Donald Trump's proposal to slash funding for the Environmental Protection Agency faced a tough crowd Thursday.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt had come to Congress to sell the budget.

Kwiaht

The Bureau of Land Management will not allow an archaeological dig at Iceberg Point in the San Juan Islands this summer after officials got an earful from residents concerned about possible impacts to the popular area.

SEIU organizer Patience Malaba leads a protest while Amazon shareholders enter the company’s annual shareholders meeting in Seattle in May.
KUOW Photo / John Ryan

Big companies often tout the good they’re doing for the planet. Reducing energy use, buying green energy, things like that. But they often reveal much less about the harm they do.

Like Amazon. With its data centers, warehouses and delivery trucks, the computing and retail giant has grown into one of the nation’s biggest users of energy.


Microsoft is trying to put the brakes on its greenhouse gas emissions.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

It’s rush hour in Wallingford, and commuters are stepping off a bus, closing up their laptops and heading into the evening sun. It’s not public transit. It’s a Microsoft Connector bus.

Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Wash., speaks with the media after testifying before the Senate Law and Justice Committee about Green River serial killer Gary Ridgway on Friday, Nov. 20, 2015, in Olympia, Wash.
AP Photo/Rachel La Corte

Democrats are drooling over a Washington state congressional seat that’s always been in Republican hands. 

Republican political consultant Chris Vance says he knows why: "Donald Trump is unbelievably unpopular," Vance said. "His approval ratings are down to 34 percent, and he's taking down the entire Republican Party with him."

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt
WH.gov

While President Trump was announcing that the United States would exit the Paris climate agreement in a ceremony at the White House, Environmental Protection Agency staff were being told to prepare for jobs to evaporate at the agency.

WH.gov

President Trump invoked the needs of American businesses and energy users when he announced Thursday that he was pulling the country out of the Paris climate accords.


Spawning salmon
US Bureau of Land Management

Salmon are starting to lose their sense of smell and their fear of predators, according to research from federal and university scientists in Seattle.


KUOW/John Ryan photo

The Trump administration has given a new lease on life to a massive Alaskan gold and copper mine that the Obama administration rejected in 2014.

Courtesy of Matthew Lipsen/Seattle University

In the newly-minted era of President Donald Trump, Washington State Governor Jay Inslee seems to be raring for a fight. He took a barrage of questions on a recent visit to Seattle University and seemed to relish the moment.

Christine Mathews says she couldn't afford health insurance without the ACA subsidies. She was at a rally last month outside  Congresswoman Suzan DelBene’s district office in Bothell.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

Efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act are ramping up again. Some GOP leaders are hoping for a vote this week on their amended plan to replace Obamacare.

And that has Washington state Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler worried.


Police officers pause next to a sign outside a restaurant as they observe a May Day anti-capitalism march, Friday, May 1, 2015 in Seattle.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

When you’re out marching on May Day in Seattle on Monday, remember how the tradition began: as an attempt to get workers an eight-hour day.

And then think about this: Some labor advocates say the eight-hour day is under attack in Congress.

'Direct action' trainer Ximena Velazquez-Arenas runs past some of the people she's training. Tap on this photo to see more images from the training.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Environmentalists concerned that lobbying and polite marches have failed to weaken America’s reliance on fossil fuels have started turning to more confrontational approaches.


David Callahan is founder and editor of Inside Philanthropy, a digital media site and his new book is "The Givers: Money, Power and Philanthropy in a New Gilded Age."
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Seattle's billionaires are changing the world. Sometimes for the better, but sometimes it's a threat to democracy. 

“Bill Gates has raised a lot of alarms,” said author David Callahan said. “Bill and Melinda Gates helped orchestrate this movement to the Common Core across the entire nation.”

Callahan continued: “I don’t want to suggest that Bill Gates is evil at all. I think he has the best of intentions, but I think that it’s pretty alarming stuff seen from a certain vantage point.” 

science march
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

It rained. 

Interstate 5 was shut down because of downed power lines. 

UW Professor David Montgomery says he'll march for science
Kvasir Society Photo/Joy Mathew

David Montgomery, a science professor and MacArthur Genius award winner at the University of Washington, told KUOW why he's marching for science on Saturday.

President Donald Trump, accompanied by from left, Vice President Mike Pence, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt, and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, speaks at EPA headquarters in Washington, March 28.
AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

The Trump administration has lifted a hiring freeze for federal agencies, but not at the Environmental Protection Agency, according to internal documents obtained by KUOW.

Trump proposed cutting the environmental agency's budget by 31 percent, more than at any major federal agency, and scrapping 56 programs there, including funding for Puget Sound restoration.

University of Washington President Ana Mari Cauce
David Hyde / KUOW Photos

University of Washington President Ana Mari Cauce says the federal budget cuts being proposed by President Donald Trump would be devastating for science. 

So she's speaking up for science, and she told KUOW's David Hyde that scientists should, too:


Screenshot of a brain hat knitting tutorial by Studio Knit on YouTube
YouTube/Studio Knit

What to wear to a protest march for science?  It's a serious debate on the March for Science, Seattle Facebook page.

Donna Dean-Wright holds a sign at the Seattle women's march on Saturday, January 21, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Have you noticed a surge in people jumping into political activism for the first time after the last election? 

Last year only 67 percent of toddlers in Washington state were fully vaccinated by age 3.
Flickr Photo/Gates Foundation (CC BY-NC-ND)

UW philosopher Michael Blake supports a march for science because, he says, basic scientific knowledge is under attack, especially from the right. But Blake told KUOW's David Hyde that liberals are partly to blame, and that the problem goes way beyond science: 


A quick glance around Lake Union and you can tell there’s a lot of science happening in our state. With the Trump administration threatening cuts to research funding, we examined how much money this could mean for Washington state.

First of all, it’s difficult to lasso all the federal dollars going to science. So we zeroed in on two big agencies to get an overview: the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, looking at their reports for the 2016 fiscal year.

Abigail Swann is a professor and climate scientist at the University of Washington
University of Washington / Quinn Russell Brown


University of Washington professor and climate researcher Abigail Swann tells politics reporter David Hyde about why she signed a protest letter directed at EPA chief Scott Pruitt. She also shares a story about the time a border official told her climate science is a hoax:  

Sarah Myhre’s a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Washington.
David Hyde / KUOW Photos

Nicole Baker is a research scientist at the University of Washington who studies the state of global fish stocks. It's not political work. In fact, she's never been an activist and has never participated in a political march in her life. 

But last year when Donald Trump ran for president, Baker got political for the first time. And she says in 2017, something snapped.


KUOW/John Ryan photo

Have you ever left a job where you were tempted to tell off your boss on your way out? After working for a quarter century at the Environmental Protection Agency, Michael Cox didn’t hold his tongue.


activists
Wenmei Hill

KUOW's politics team recently asked listeners: Has Donald Trump's election inspired you to get politically active for the first time? Here's a selection of responses we received. 

Attendees of the Mar. 4 Spirit of America Rally in Olympia, a pro-Trump event organized by Tacoma Narrows Tea Party coordinator Peggy Hutt (center) of Gig Harbor.
Photo courtesy Peggy Hutt

Donald Trump’s election galvanized a wave of activism on the left, including the women’s march that some political scientists say was the largest in American history.

Campaigners on the right say they’ve been energized by the election as well, even here in deep-blue Puget Sound.


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