transportation

KUOW Photo/Deb Wang

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray says he'll review the city's regulations on helicopter use following Tuesday's crash of a KOMO News helicopter that killed two and injured one. Washington State Ferries chief David Moseley announces his resignation. Plus, Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant says she'll support a gradual phase-in of the $15 minimum wage for small businesses and nonprofits. 

Steve Scher reviews these stories and more with news analyst Joni Balter, Crosscut's Knute Berger, Eli Sanders of The Stranger and Livewire host Luke Burbank.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

The city of Seattle is re-timing traffic signals throughout the city to make crosswalks safer for all pedestrians.

A study conducted by a group of graduate students at the University of Washington School of Public Health in 2013 found that traffic signals in Rainier Valley force pedestrians to cross faster than signals on Market Street in the wealthier and whiter neighborhood of Ballard.

Flickr Photo/Washington State Department of Transportation (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Douglas MacDonald, former Secretary of Transportation for Washington and current contributing writer for Crosscut. MacDonald talks about the challenges awaiting the new director of the Washington State Ferries. Current director David Moseley resigned earlier this week. His last day is April 15.

This post is being updated.

Satellite images showing objects floating in the Indian Ocean have focused the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 and the 239 people who were on board to an area about 1,500 miles southwest of Perth, Australia.

David Moseley, the head of Washington State Ferries, announced Tuesday that he will step down on April 15 after six years on the job.

From Uber's Facebook page.

Marcie Sillman talks with Brooke Steger, general manager for Seattle Uber, about the new limits to ridesharing Seattle's City Council passed Monday.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

You may see fewer cars with pink mustaches on the road in the coming months.

Seattle’s City Council yesterday gave final approval to a plan that would limit the number of cars that rideshare companies like Lyft, UberX and Sidecar can operate.

SEATTLE -- More oil is moving through Washington state from the Bakken oil fields, putting public pressure on elected officials to pass laws protecting public health and the environment.

Bakken oil from North Dakota and Montana has proven extremely flammable, causing several explosions in North America, including one that killed 47 people in Quebec last July.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT

The past could present yet another obstacle to the future of the state Route 99 megaproject on the Seattle waterfront.

Archaeologists with the tunnel project started digging a series of 60 small holes Thursday to see if any signs of historic or prehistoric human activity are in the area.

The Washington legislature adjourned its 60-day session just before midnight Thursday night.

As A First State To Regulate Ridesharing, California Offers Its Progress

Mar 13, 2014
Flickr Photo/Bill Rosenfeld (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with San Francisco Chronicle reporter Carolyn Said about California's state-wide rideshare regulations. Said talks about how they are playing out in San Francisco and what Seattle's proposed driver caps could mean for rideshare companies all over.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about restoring the Seattle Police Department's reputation, new cracks in the Alaskan Way Viaduct and the latest progress on the minimum wage debate.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Of the nearly 1,050 traffic signals in Seattle, about 100 have audible traffic signals. Pedestrians who have gotten used to the chirps and cuckoo sounds are contending with a new tone. So far, multiple people have described the new “rapid ticks” as jarring, according to the Seattle Department of Transportation.

Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It’s been hard to get straight answers about what forced Bertha, the world's largest tunnel machine, to halt. It began boring July 30, 2013, and when Bertha broke down in December, it was ahead of schedule. Since then, the machine has been mostly idle beneath the Seattle waterfront. Project officials still haven't publicly identified a root cause.

Flickr Photo/Washington State Dept of Transportation (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with OPB Salem reporter Chris Lehman and KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the end of the Columbia River Crossing bridge project. Also Austin discusses what to expect as the Washington State Legislature wraps up its session this Thursday.

Pages