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transportation

Washington Governor Jay Inslee stands before a wall of traffic monitors at a state transportation management center with Patty Rubstello, WSDOT's Assistant Secretary for Tolling
KUOW Photo / Joshua McNichols

Governor Jay Inslee has a plan to improve traffic on Interstate 405. He says the new toll lanes are helping, but traffic has grown worse between Kirkland and Lynnwood since tolling began. On Tuesday, he laid out his strategy for the corridor.

Lois Harris opened the Vogue Coiffure Beauty Salon on 23rd Avenue in 1966. Road construction there has put her in the worst financial situation she's seen yet.
KUOW Photo / Joshua McNichols

Central District business owners will get a chance to tell city officials about the problems on 23rd Avenue on Tuesday. They say a big road project there has scared away their customers. They want a financial bailout, but the city says no.

'Week in Review' panel Ijeoma Oluo, Joni Balter, Bill Radke and Paul Guppy.
KUOW Photo/Bill Radke

The Week in Review panel covered many issues on this week’s show: what this presidential race says about us, Whitman College’s mascot debate and 405 tolls.

But one segment got particularly heated when KUOW’s Bill Radke, Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter, Washington Policy Center economist Paul Guppy and writer Ijeoma Oluo discussed whether Washington state should make it easier to charge a police officer in the use of deadly force.

Sound Transit's Roosevelt Station, under construction in January, 2016.
KUOW Photo / Joshua McNichols

An independent consultant says Sound Transit is doing a good job estimating costs as it shapes the Sound Transit 3 ballot measure. But a cost estimate can’t predict everything — future property values, for example, or even more earthly things, such as the cost of a pound of rebar.

A toll area on Interstate 405.
Flickr Photo/SounderBruce (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ruiWYC

Bill Radke talks with Debbie Jaksich, program manager for King County's Communities In Motion program about the benefits of carpooling.

Some people ride the bus to work. Some rent a bus to party on. So-called party buses have been in the news a lot in recent years because of accidents and deaths across the country.

Sound Transit Senior Planner Val Batey on First Avenue in Seattle. Batey says her agency is exploring First Avenue as a possible surface route for trains serving Ballard and West Seattle.
KUOW Photo / Joshua McNichols

This fall, voters will decide whether to extend Sound Transit’s light rail farther, like to Everett and Tacoma. The ballot measure is called Sound Transit 3.

Planners are deciding now where to put the trains that the measure would bring into Seattle because there isn’t enough room in the existing downtown transit tunnel.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee took the gloves off Monday and launched a full-throated attack on Senate Republicans for sacking his Secretary of Transportation in a surprise move last Friday afternoon. 

Washington Governor Jay Inslee has cancelled a series of regularly scheduled meetings with the Republican leader of the state Senate. The move follows Friday’s surprise vote by Senate Republicans to oust Inslee’s Secretary of Transportation.

Republicans listed other problems with transportation in the state since Peterson took the job: Tolling on 520 across Lake Washington, Bertha, the enormous boring tunnel in Seattle that has failed to move forward, and ferries breaking down.
Associated Press Pool Photo/Joshua Trujillo/Seattlepi.com

A coup went down in Olympia this afternoon.

Surprising Democrats, Republican lawmakers called for a confirmation vote for Lynn Peterson, Secretary of Transportation for Washington state. In a party line vote of 25 to 21, they fired her.

Engineering researchers at the University of Washington are working on ways to improve bus service in the Puget Sound area.
Flickr Photo/Dan Ox

On a rainy Seattle morning, Cameka Knock stands at a bus stop near Edmonds and Rainier in Columbia City.

She takes the bus to school, and she says that recently the one she was trying to catch passed her by because it was full.

Google self driving car at the Computer History Museum.
Flickr Photo/Don DeBold (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/o7T6qb

In five years, self-driving cars will be on the road.

Let that sink in.

Pronto Bikes in Seattle's University District
KUOW Photo / Joshua McNichols

The City of Seattle may take over the Pronto Bike sharing program. Officials are trying to decide now whether the program is a good thing, or a lemon.

Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff, King County Executive Dow Constantine and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray at Capitol Hill's light rail station.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Capitol Hill and Husky Stadium light rail stations will open to passengers at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 19.

Bill Radke talks with University of Washington researcher Anat Caspi about Access Map Seattle, which provides information for people with limited mobility. The map contains information about street elevation changes, access to curb ramps and locations of construction sites. Caspi directs the Taskar Center For Accessible Technology at the UW.

Mark Adreon took KUOW on a walk through Capitol Hill to demonstrate how hard it is being blind and navigating the endless construction sites in the city. When he arrived at this spot, the placards through him off course.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Mark Adreon’s guide dog is a yellow Lab named Trek.

"As in Star Trek,” Adreon said. “Trek and I have been working together since Sept. 1st."

Washington state ends public comment Friday on a proposed oil terminal at the Port of Vancouver.

The Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council has taken public comment on the Vancouver Energy Project since November when it released its draft environmental impact statement.

The project is a joint venture backed by oil company Tesoro Corp. and logistics firm Savage Industries.

The agency is taking comments on its website until 11:59 p.m. Friday.

The Record: Thursday, Jan. 21, Full Show

Jan 21, 2016
studio record
KUOW Photo

A Ballard social club isn't ready to sell a parcel of land to a Ballard health club. But what happens when health club members become the social club members? Unethical or not? We'll tell you the story.

Also, should you be able to rent out your place on Airbnb even if that means one less house for a local renter?

And King County might create three new passenger ferry routes. Are we going back to our future of water transportation?

Listen to the full show above, or check out the individual stories:

Olympic Athletic Club on the left and the toxic lot across the street that the gym wants to turn into a 400-stall parking garage.
Google Maps

The lot at 5244 Leary Avenue Northwest doesn’t look like it’s worth $2.4 million.

It’s a toxic site, for one. It used to be a gas station, and there are six leaking gas tanks underground. And it’s small, roughly 8,800 square feet.

Sound Transit
Flickr photo/ Atomic Taco (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Uf2PYF

Bill Radke talks to new Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff about his vision for the future of public transit in the Puget Sound area.

As Iran prepares to pump even more oil into an already glutted market, that oversupply isn't just making gas cheaper for your car — it's also causing jet fuel prices to go down sharply. And that's now pushing airfares down, too.

Thanks to a measure approved by Oregon lawmakers last summer, you’ll soon be able to legally drive faster on more than 1,500 miles of highways in Oregon. But while the bill sped through the legislature fairly quickly, there's a lot to be done before Oregon drivers can speed up.

U District Station, 90 percent designed, shows conservative art referencing the neighborhood's architectural heritage.
Sound Transit

The public will have its last chance to weigh in on the design for the University District light rail station this Thursday. The project is 90 percent designed and shows a conservative approach to its public art.

At least, it's conservative compared to Capitol Hill Station. That station features two fighter jets, which appear to explode like brittle origami cranes in a jet kiss over the station platform. 

Hundreds of people are expected to turn out Tuesday for the second public hearing on a proposed oil terminal in southwest Washington.

For the second time this month, the public will once again get to voice their thoughts about the Tesoro-Savage backed oil terminal called the Vancouver Energy Project.

The hearing is being lead by the Washington State Energy Site Evaluation Council.

The North American International Auto Show is a place where car industry gathers to celebrate — and in recent years to apologize. At this year's show in Detroit, it was Volkswagen CEO Matthias Mueller's turn to face the media.

The Department of Homeland Security Friday extended its deadline for non-compliant states to raise ID card standards. That means a regular driver's license issued by Idaho, Oregon or Washington state will be acceptable identification to board an airplane for at least another two years.

There were high-fives this week from Detroit to Washington, D.C., as carmakers celebrated record auto sales.

Americans bought 17.5 million cars and trucks in 2015. That's a huge turnaround from 2009, and the Obama administration cheered the rebound as vindication of the president's decision to rescue General Motors and Chrysler from bankruptcy.

"Because of the policy decisions that were made by this administration to place a bet on those workers, America has won, and our economy has been better for it," White House spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters Wednesday.

In this Dec. 15, 2015 photo, a crew member working for Seattle Tunnel Partners watches a crane lift other crew members out of the pit that STP used to access and repair Bertha.
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1O7O5sO

Bertha is on the move again. 

The tunnel boring machine got stuck a little over two years ago, shortly after it hit a metal pipe. It’s taken until now to get the machine going again.

Like cheap gasoline?

Then you're in luck. Experts say gas prices very likely will keep falling. That's because a report released Wednesday showed a sharp increase in gasoline inventories.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration said that last week, companies added another 10.6 million barrels of gasoline, creating the biggest surge in supply since 1993. That added to fears that supplies will far outstrip demand for a long time.

Cynthia Ulrich of Stop 405 Tolls looks unhappy as she prepares to enter the toll lane for the first time.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

A beat-up red convertible bumps south along Interstate 405. Driver Cynthia Ulrich is about to break her boycott on the freeway’s new toll lanes -- all to help KUOW illustrate how tolls are collected and spent.

But she’s not happy about it.

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