transportation

The search is on to find an alternative to salting the roads in winter. Salt helps melt the ice, but it also builds up in stream beds and drinking water.

A study says that iPhone's Siri program -- which can be used without hands or eyes -- is a huge distraction for drivers.
Flickr Photo/Elizabeth Press (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The Washington Traffic Safety Commission is taking another run at an expanded distracted driving law. A proposed bill is sitting at the governor’s office now. The legislation would expand the current ban on texting or holding a handset to the ear to include touching a mobile device while driving.

Though the proposal addresses more of the ways people are interacting with their devices, it leaves out one major distraction:  Siri.

The Washington State Patrol has ticketed the driver of an oversize load that collapsed the Skagit River Bridge in May of 2013.

Delta Air Lines CEO Richard Anderson said his company wants to nearly double its footprint at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

bus traffic transportation
Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC BY-NC-ND)

Posey Gruener interviews Metro bus drivers at Northgate Transit Center, who describe why they're having trouble catching a bathroom break.

And Marcie Sillman speaks with Paul Bachtel, president of the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 587, which represents transit operators. Bachtel said access to bathrooms is "probably the most significant issue [for the union right now]. It's much greater than wages, or benefits. It's a working issues condition and it's the number one cry of unfairness from our transit operators at this point in time."

KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Rainier Avenue, one of two main arterials in Seattle’s southend has a notorious problem with aggressive, speeding drivers.

Flickr Photo/Skip&Nell (CC BY-NC-ND)

Texting while driving increases the crash risk 23 times – similar to driving with a blood alcohol level of 0.19 (the max in Washington state is 0.08).

Currently, texting or holding a phone to your ear is illegal, but what about other phone activities, like Facebook or shopping?

Flickr Photo/Kris Krug (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the tight Vancouver mayoral race and how the city is taking lessons from Seattle's successful ballot initiative to fund public transportation.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

These are the election results as of Wednesday, 4:35 p.m.

Flickr Photo/Andy Nash (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with activist Elizabeth Campbell about her voter initiative to fund planning to build a monorail line in Seattle. Then, Reynolds talks with Crosscut's Knute Berger about the political history of the monorail.

Washington’s rail safety regulator says there are about 3,000 rail crossings in the state that inspectors have never looked at. That's because they're on private land.

Will Seattle's Bus Prop 1 Solve Our Busing Problems?

Oct 28, 2014
A crowd of passengers makes their way on to a bus.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bus riders are used to competing for the few remaining spaces at the last stop before many West Seattle-bound buses enter the Viaduct. If Proposition 1 passes this November, King County would increase service at congested stops.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Department of Transportation (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with freelance cities reporter Nate Berg about what place streetcars have in transportation infrastructure. 

See That Red Lane, Seattle Drivers? Don’t Go There

Oct 22, 2014
An SDOT Crew puts the finishing touches on a bus-only lane on Battery Street in Seattle's Belltown Neighborhood.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Traffic in Seattle is sluggishly slow – you know that already. It’s eating three hours more of your life now than it did two years ago.

That’s why the City of Seattle announced improvements this week to help buses move more efficiently through the city. Advocates say the small improvements add up to faster, more reliable bus service.

On Tuesday, at the corner of 4th and Battery in Seattle’s Belltown neighborhood, Seattle Department of Transportation crews stenciled the words “Bus Only” onto a lane of traffic that they have painted entirely in red.

One night last fall, I was walking through Chinatown in Washington, D.C., with my friend Terryn. We were not far from a dude who was in his mid-20s — slim, with neat, shoulder-length locks, skinny chinos, loafers and a leather briefcase slung across his torso — standing on the corner, his arm raised skyward. He was trying without luck to hail a cab.

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