transportation

How Big Of A Risk Are Oil Trains?

Mar 6, 2015
oil train, transportation
Flickr Photo/Russ Allison

Ross Reynolds speaks with Lisa Copeland, of the Washington State Department of Ecology, about the risk oil trains could pose to the state.

Also, Reynolds speaks to Kevin Book, an analyst from ClearView Energy Partners in Washington, D.C, and with Kristen Boyles, attorney for environmental law firm Earth Justice, about the implications of oil trains in our region.

Instead of fighting like cats and dogs, Congress appears to be coming together for a change, and maybe it's because of our feline and canine friends.

In a rare bipartisan vote, the House Wednesday approved an Amtrak funding bill that will keep the trains running for another four years, and allow some pets to ride along on the intercity passenger rail service.

Tacoma Link Light Rail train approaches
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Politicians in Olympia are negotiating the final size of a transportation package. But we found out this week it may not be as much as some people hoped. Transit advocates hope the final package will pay to extend light rail from Seattle to Everett and Tacoma. 

KUOW’s Joshua McNichols went to Tacoma to find out more.

Northwest Officials Unite Against Coal And Oil Trains

Mar 4, 2015

More than 150 elected officials from across the Northwest have teamed up to speak out against coal and oil trains. Their new group, the Safe Energy Leadership Alliance, held its third meeting in Portland Tuesday.

Washington's King County Executive Dow Constantine has stepped up to chair the group. It includes officials from Oregon, Washington, Idaho and British Columbia.

A line of Car2Gos in the South Lake Union district of Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Car-sharing company Car2Go expanded in Seattle this week. That means a little more competition for parking spots that can already be hard to come by. Is the city trying to make life harder for car owners? And is that fair? Bill Radke talks with Seattle journalist Erica C. Barnett.

Rachel Martin owns and manages Ballard Blossom. She says she monitors the news, apps and public websites to determine the most efficient route for her delivery drivers.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Mayor Ed Murray laid out his 10-year transportation plan Monday. The move sets the stage for renewing the transportation levy that expires this year. He plans to reveal a new levy proposal in a few weeks.

The Republican-led Washington Senate Monday approved a nearly 12-cents-per-gallon gas tax increase phased in over three years.

Flickr Photo/Atomic Taco (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins and state Rep. Jessyn Farrell, D-Seattle, about a possible transportation package in the legislature. 

This weekend, the Seattle metro area launched an initiative to address income inequality through public transit. People in low-income households can now ride buses, trains and ferries at reduced fares.

The initiative is among the first of its kind in the U.S., and transit experts across the country are watching closely. Thomas Sanchez, a professor of urban affairs and planning at Virginia Tech, discusses the initiative with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Changes are afoot at King County Metro. Bus fares went up over the weekend by 25 cents. Bus drivers started accepting the county's new reduced fare cards, called ORCA Lift. And Metro's gone on a hiring spree as it gears up to fulfill Seattle's custom order, approved by voters last fall, for 10 percent more bus service.

A panel in the Idaho House agreed to introduce legislation Thursday that would define ride-sharing services like Uber in state law -- and trump local efforts to regulate them.

Bertha, the tunnel boring machine, emerges from more than a year of captivity. The machine's turbines can be seen beneath the plume of dust.
Washington State Department of Transportation

The tunnel machine that’s been stuck underground for more than a year reached daylight Thursday.

Now Bertha is slowly inching into position for repair work to begin. 

The cutterhead on Seattle's troubled tunnel boring machine broke through the wall of a rescue pit at midday Thursday.

Workers prepare to snap in a new section of roadway on the east side of the SR 520 bridge.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Construction of the new state Route 520 bridge is about halfway along now. But just as our tunnel mega-project has a major complication, SR 520 has its own mega-snag: we lack the minimum $1.6 billion to complete it.

The state’s highway department is also not clear on the final design of the "Rest of the West," as this embattled section of the 520 bridge is called.

According to the Idaho Supreme Court, an apparent error in Idaho’s legal code could make certain highway speed limits unenforceable.

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