transportation

Seattle streets, seen from the 40th floor of the Seattle Municipal Tower.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle's new parking meters, scheduled to replace 2,200 outdated meters, are kind of a big deal. Their guts and brains are state of the art, with speedy cellular service, bigger screens and a numeric keypad capable of ingesting complex kinds of information, such as license plate numbers.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

These are the election results as of Wednesday, 4:35 p.m.

Flickr Photo/Andy Nash (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with activist Elizabeth Campbell about her voter initiative to fund planning to build a monorail line in Seattle. Then, Reynolds talks with Crosscut's Knute Berger about the political history of the monorail.

Washington’s rail safety regulator says there are about 3,000 rail crossings in the state that inspectors have never looked at. That's because they're on private land.

Will Seattle's Bus Prop 1 Solve Our Busing Problems?

Oct 28, 2014
A crowd of passengers makes their way on to a bus.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bus riders are used to competing for the few remaining spaces at the last stop before many West Seattle-bound buses enter the Viaduct. If Proposition 1 passes this November, King County would increase service at congested stops.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Department of Transportation (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with freelance cities reporter Nate Berg about what place streetcars have in transportation infrastructure. 

See That Red Lane, Seattle Drivers? Don’t Go There

Oct 22, 2014
An SDOT Crew puts the finishing touches on a bus-only lane on Battery Street in Seattle's Belltown Neighborhood.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Traffic in Seattle is sluggishly slow – you know that already. It’s eating three hours more of your life now than it did two years ago.

That’s why the City of Seattle announced improvements this week to help buses move more efficiently through the city. Advocates say the small improvements add up to faster, more reliable bus service.

On Tuesday, at the corner of 4th and Battery in Seattle’s Belltown neighborhood, Seattle Department of Transportation crews stenciled the words “Bus Only” onto a lane of traffic that they have painted entirely in red.

One night last fall, I was walking through Chinatown in Washington, D.C., with my friend Terryn. We were not far from a dude who was in his mid-20s — slim, with neat, shoulder-length locks, skinny chinos, loafers and a leather briefcase slung across his torso — standing on the corner, his arm raised skyward. He was trying without luck to hail a cab.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A new fleet of bicycles will start rolling down Seattle streets Monday when the city’s bike share program gets underway. The bright green bikes will be easy to spot and 500 of them will be stationed across Seattle’s urban core: downtown, the University of Washington and Capitol Hill.

This Week In Downsizing

Oct 3, 2014
Flickr Photo/Xurxo Martinez

Boeing reduces local defense jobs, Metro reduces bus cuts and Seattle reduces its plans on the waterfront. Plus: How are you reacting to Ebola’s arrival in the U.S.?

Bill Radke discusses these topics with Crosscut's Knute Berger, KUOW reporter Deborah Wang and Maria LaGanga, Seattle bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times.

AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File

“Sobering” is how Washington Governor Jay Inslee summed up a draft report about the risks of increased oil transport through the state.  In the report, the State Department of Ecology describes an unprecedented growth in this local transport, from virtually no trains carrying crude oil in 2011 to 714 million gallons in 2013.

Oil Spill Task Force Braces For More Crude By Rail

Oct 2, 2014

A regional oil spill task force met in Portland Wednesday to discuss the risks of crude oil traveling by rail.

The Pacific States British Columbia Oil Spill Task Force coordinates oil spill response plans among five U.S. states and B.C. A lot of its members have noticed the same worrisome trend: more crude oil is traveling by rail cars instead of arriving on ships, and many agencies aren't prepared for oil spills along rail lines.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

As we bid the tourists adieu, we welcome back the cranes and construction.

Season 2 of Seattle’s waterfront development project starts Wednesday. It includes work from Colman Dock to the Aquarium, and holes in the ground already show the concrete face of the 1930s-era seawall, soon to be demolished. 

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

If you are a bus rider in King County, you might want to double check to make sure your bus will be running next week.

Dow Constantine in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Marcie Sillman talks to King County Executive Dow Constantine  about the new 2015-2016 budget.

Pages