Highline school bus driver Rodger Fowler shows off his stop paddle – and (in the lower-right corner) the camera that captures motorists who ignore the paddle.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

If you illegally pass a school bus in the Highline District, you’re likely to get $394 ticket in the mail.

The district is one of the first in the state to roll out a new school bus camera system that helps nab drivers who ignore buses' lighted stop paddles.

The Polar Pioneer oil rig in Terminal 5 at the Port of Seattle this summer.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

In the end one battle over Shell Oil’s Arctic drilling effort came down to the Websters New Collegiate Dictionary’s definition of “good.”

A Seattle hearing examiner gave the Port of Seattle, Foss Maritime and Shell a victory Wednesday by deciding that materials loaded onto Shell’s ships at Terminal 5 met that definition.

City of Seattle pothole rangers at work in 2011.
Seattle Department of Transportation

The cure for some of Seattle’s transportation pains may be tough to swallow: a nearly $800 increase in annual taxes, fees and user charges for the city’s typical household.

That number comes from former state transportation chief Doug MacDonald, who calculated the cost of changes in state tax structure, car-tab charges and proposed levies.

A massive multi-family apartment building with commercial retail spaces underneath. A train enters the photo in the foreground at the left of the frame.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds talks to King County Executive Dow Constantine about his new initiative to develop 700 units of affordable housing around transit centers. 

Citing a lack of confidence, Washington’s Utilities and Transportation Commission has taken emergency action to suspend Ride the Ducks tours in Seattle.

An injured person is taken from the scene of the Aurora Bridge bus crash on Thursday.
KUOW photo/Liz Jones

The Duck vehicle had a fatal flaw.

As investigators picked through the wreckage that killed five students and left dozens badly injured, they saw the front left axle had been sheared off.

A woman is taken to an ambulance on the Aurora Bridge after the crash Thursday.
KUOW photo/Liz Jones

They came to Seattle from around the world: Austria, China, Indonesia and Japan. 

They died on the Aurora Bridge on Thursday.

They were mourned at North Seattle College on Friday, where some students said they were frightened by the collision between a large tourist vehicle known as “the Duck” and a bus.

The tall ship Monogahela passes under the uncompleted Aurora Bridge circa 1931.
Library of Congress

When Mike Warren of Queen Anne turned on his TV Thursday, his gut tightened.

Four people had died in a collision on the Aurora Bridge beneath his house. Another 50 or so had been injured. They were international students enrolled at North Seattle College.

“I was going back through the craziness from when Jonathan died,” Warren said.

An injured person is taken from the scene of the Aurora Bridge bus crash on Thursday.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Is the Aurora Bridge too narrow for six fast-moving lanes? Tim Eyman is in trouble again, and unrepentantly so. What did China’s president bring to Seattle besides traffic? Will Seattle’s tallest landmark be eclipsed by a long shot? And what if the Seahawks never win again?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with Knute Berger, Joni Balter and Bill Finkbeiner, plus KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph, Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins, Puget Sound Business Journal’s Emily Parkhurst  and Mike Pesca of Slate’s The Gist podcast.

David Hyde speaks with Washington state Representative Reuven Caryle (D-Queen Anne) about the Aurora Bridge collision. 

How many Oregon bridges will hold up in a major earthquake?

New data compiled by the Oregon Department of Transportation reveals at least part of the answer. The results aren't pretty for a region facing 1-in-3 odds of a magnitude 8 or larger earthquake in the next 50 years.

ODOT data details the seismic vulnerability of bridges under state control. The data focuses on “lifeline” routes, or routes deemed critical to emergency services and necessary for “rapid economic recovery after a disaster."

Washington state officials are moving faster on a scheduled inspection of the amphibious fleet that had a vehicle involved in a fatal crash Thursday on the Aurora Bridge in Seattle.

North Seattle College international students Max Putera and Jeffrey Tung.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Monday will be the first day of school for North Seattle College. The students in the international program will have a lot more than school on their minds. They’ll be thinking about the four students who died in a bus crash on the Aurora bridge Thursday.

An injured person is taken from the scene of the Aurora Bridge bus crash on Thursday.
KUOW photo/Liz Jones

UPDATE, 3;10 p.m.: A duck amphibious tour vehicle swerved into a charter bus carrying international students on the Aurora Bridge Thursday. At least four people died and dozens were injured, emergency officials said.

At least 44 people were taken to hospitals.

Hey Bridge Tender! Why Do You Keep Raising The Bridge?

Sep 22, 2015
Bridge tender David Leask has worked in the control tower at the Ballard Bridge for 18 years.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

“What is a day in the life of a Seattle bridge tender?”

Laura Osterbrock of Magnolia asked that question as part of KUOW’s Local Wonder project.

Part of the answer: Sometimes they watch drivers throw fits as the bridge starts to rise.

“Some drivers do interact, with their hand signals,” said Ballard Bridge tender David Leask with a bit of a shrug. “You hear them screaming sometimes.”