trade | KUOW News and Information

trade

Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Wash., speaks with the media after testifying before the Senate Law and Justice Committee about Green River serial killer Gary Ridgway on Friday, Nov. 20, 2015, in Olympia, Wash.
AP Photo/Rachel La Corte

Kim Malcolm talks with U.S. Rep Dave Reichert about why he's opposed to President Trump's tariffs on steel and aluminum. The tariffs affect imports from the European Union, Canada and Mexico.

A container ship at the Port of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Bari Bookout (CC-BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6kUVcr

The world's biggest cargo ships, some a quarter-mile long, could be docking regularly near downtown Seattle before long.

After four years' study, the Army Corps of Engineers has given the okay to digging deeper shipping channels around Harbor Island at the mouth of the Duwamish River.

Apples at the Olympia Farmers Market.
Flickr Photo/WSDA (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ZsGd1C

U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum went into effect Friday for Canada, the European Union and Mexico. That decision by the Trump Administration could now hurt one of Washington state's signature exports: apples. 


Gary Locke is former U.S. ambassador to China and former Governor of Washington State
KUOW Photos / David Hyde

Gary Locke worries the Trump administration is lurching toward a twofold disaster in its China policy.

But he's also hopeful that disaster can be avoided.

Brian Wahlberg gives daughter Luciena a good view of the proceedings as the crowd sings at Cal Anderson Park in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

In the liberal bastion that is Seattle, the response to the election was acute. People cried openly on buses and in cafes. Some took time off work to mourn in bed. It wasn't that their candidate had lost, we heard again and again, it was that they feared for the future.

Canada flag American flag
Flickr Photo/Bruno Casonato (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/c1MdB

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a new trade deal between Canada and the European Union, and about the U.S. presidential elections.

"We, the trade ministers ... are pleased to announce that we have successfully concluded the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiation," U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman announced Monday morning, to a loud round of applause.

So far, few Northwest Democrats are getting on board with a deal to "fast track" a pending Pacific trade agreement, The Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The global shipping industry is a ferociously competitive business, and the trans-Pacific route — from Asia to the West Coast seaports of the U.S. — is considered one of the most lucrative routes. Normally, cargo ships carrying everything from fruits and vegetables to cars and electronics can count on getting into a berth at one of the 29 West Coast seaports in a reasonable time.

Aviation Consultant: WTO Trade Rules Are 'Toothless'

May 20, 2014
Flickr Photo/Andrew W. Sieber (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Scott Hamilton, an aviation consultant from the Leeham company, about the European Union's potential challenge to Boeing's tax breaks and what that says about trade rules and international business.

Flickr Photo/Jiuck

You've heard the phrase, "It's not personal, it's business." But as people start to share everything from their bedroom to their dog it can, and often is both. So what is the sharing economy? A personal exchange of goods and services, sometimes for free, sometimes for money.

Think couch surfing, where homeowners allow people to sleep on their couch or in their spare bedroom for free. Or AirBnB where you can rent out your house or apartment. Or the Phinney Neighborhood Association's tool library that allows you to borrow tools without a fee. Or new services that allow you to rent out your car. There is even a co-op to share dogs. Ross Reynolds talks to listeners about their experiences, both good and bad, in this new sharing economy.