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tobacco

Lung cancer isn't just a smoker's disease

Sep 13, 2016
Lung cancer carries the stigma of being caused by a person's own actions, but many get lung cancer without ever having smoked.
Flickr Photo/Hannah Sorensson (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/o8CRgP

Bill Radke speaks with writer Janet Freeman-Daily, a lung cancer survivor, about the fact that lung cancer is not just a smoker's disease. Freeman-Daily says the association between lung cancer and smoking makes it harder for lung cancer researchers to get funding because it's seen as something people bring upon themselves. Freeman-Daily herself has never been a smoker. 

Nicola Lindson-Hawley remembers how hard it was for her mom to stop smoking.

"One of the reasons I find this topic very interesting and why I went into it was because my mom was a smoker when I was younger," says Lindson-Hawley, who studies tobacco and health at the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences at the University of Oxford.

Removing any doubt about whether you're allowed to puff away on an electronic cigarette while airborne, the Department of Transportation has explicitly banned vaping on commercial flights.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson is renewing his push to raise the smoking and vaping age to 21. The Democrat announced the bipartisan effort Wednesday at a Capitol news conference.

Oregon is the only Northwest state that doesn't require businesses selling tobacco products to be licensed. One lawmaker is introducing a bill that would change that.

Cigarettes in an ash tray.
Flickr photo/Curran Kelleher (CC BY 2.0) HTTP://BIT.LY/1O4LD7V

State Rep. Tina Orwall just marked the two-year anniversary of her mom’s death from lung cancer.

“It’s a horrific way to lose someone,” Orwall, whose father also died of a smoking-related disease, told KUOW's David Hyde.

People who use electronic cigarettes in Oregon will have fewer places to light up starting in January. That's because of a new law that takes effect with the start of the year.

Nearly 1.2 million public housing units would need to become "entirely smoke-free" under a new rule put forth Thursday by Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro.

The proposed rule would give more than 3,100 public housing agencies 18 months to ban cigarettes, cigars and pipes in all living units, indoor common areas and within 25 feet of buildings. The ban would also apply to administrative offices.

Cigar smokers in Oregon could soon have to pay more in taxes.

The Oregon Senate approved a measure Monday that would ban sales of e-cigarettes to minors as well as ban the use of e-cigarettes in the same places where traditional cigarettes are prohibited.

The Food and Drug Administration is weighing whether to allow a tobacco company to do something it's never done before — claim that one of its products is less risky than cigarettes.

The company, Swedish Match of Stockholm, has applied to the FDA to designate its General brand of snus (rhymes with "loose") as safer than other versions of tobacco.

Larenda Myres holds an iced coffee drink with a "Race Together" sticker on it at a Starbucks store in Seattle, Wednesday, March 18, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Why did the Starbucks race initiative bother us THAT much? Should you be able to smoke in a Seattle park? And should you fight wage discrimination by talking openly about how much money you make? (How much DO you make?)

Bill Radke analyzes this week’s top stories with former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels, Northwest News Network’s Phyllis Fletcher and The Stranger's Eli Sanders.

A Better Way To Tax Cigarettes

Mar 18, 2015
Flickr Photo/David Grant

Bill Radke talks with Washington state Sen. Andy Hill, R-Redmond, about Governor Jay Inslee's proposal to raise cigarette taxes.

Oregon is one of a handful of states that doesn't restrict the sale of electronic cigarettes to minors. The Oregon House voted Monday to change that.

The U.S. surgeon general lists 21 deadly diseases that are caused by smoking. Now, a study in this week's New England Journal of Medicine points to more than a dozen other diseases that apparently add to the tobacco death toll.

To arrive at this conclusion, scientists from the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute and several universities tracked nearly a million people for a decade and recorded their causes of death.

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