Tim Burgess

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

The city of Seattle would create a plan to let all children attend preschool for free or on a sliding scale under a resolution proposed by City Councilman Tim Burgess.

Your Take On The News

May 24, 2013
WSDOT Photo

We'll get live updates from the scene of the bridge collapse in Skagit County from KUOW reporter Derek Wang.

In a major policy speech Thursday, President Obama defended his administration's use of unmanned drones, but vowed to scale back their use in the future. He also renewed efforts to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay. What are the unanswered questions about President Obama's counter-terrorism policy? What can we expect from the President moving forward?

The Seattle Mayor's race got a big shakeup recently when Tim Burgess abruptly dropped out of the contest. How will this affect the rest of the candidates? Who does it help and who does it hurt?

And on his first day on the job, interim Seattle Police Chief Jim Pugel made some changes to his staff. Does this signal more changes to come at the SPD?

What stories that caught your attention this week? Call us at 800.289.5869, email weekday@kuow.org or send us a tweet @WeekdayKUOW.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Seattle City Council Member Tim Burgess is stepping down as a mayoral candidate.  His disclosure came as the filing deadline loomed for the November election. Burgess said he won’t yet endorse anyone. But he said he’s leaving the race to make it easier for another candidate to unseat incumbent Mayor Mike McGinn. 

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

UPDATE: 5/21/13, 3:50 p.m. PT

The list of candidates running for Seattle mayor is now finalized, and despite the withdrawal of one high-profile contender, the field has gotten even more crowded.

In an eleventh hour surprise, City Councilmember Tim Burgess, the leading fundraiser in the race, announced he was dropping out.

At the same time, two relatively unknown candidates entered the field, bringing the total number of mayoral hopefuls to nine.

Amy Radil

Members of the Young Urban Authors program meet twice a week in a small storefront near 23rd and Jackson in Seattle. The program is one of many funded by Seattle’s Youth Violence Prevention Initiative. In this program, the teenagers spend months writing and editing their own books — fiction or non-fiction — which are then printed in paperback form.