Credit Seattle Rep Theatre

Jerry Manning, the artistic leader of Seattle Repertory Theatre, died suddenly on Wednesday following complications from a routine surgery in March, according to a news release from the theater. He was 58.

The Tony nominations are out, and it was a good year to be playing eight people at the same time.

Courtesy of Simon Hayter

What does it mean to be a winner in today's society? That's a concept Canadian theater artists James Long and Marcus Youssef explore in their show, "Winners and Losers." They've taken the show all over the world, most recently to Seattle's On The Boards.

No one knows the exact date of William Shakespeare's birth, but devotees have adopted April 23 as the day to celebrate — and this year, the man from Stratford turns 450.

Courtesy of Annex Theatre/Shane Regan

When Rachel Atkins was 7, she and her sisters got a new stepfather. Atkins loved this man, but when she and her family went out in public, they raised a lot of eyebrows.

On The Boards

Gun violence is something you hear about in the news every day. So it was only a matter of time before it was featured in a contemporary performance. Choreographer, writer and composer Dayna Hanson tackles the subject in her new performance, "The Clay Duke," premiering at Seattle's On The Boards this weekend (Dec. 5-8).

Courtesy of Seattle Reperator Theatre/Nate Watters

It's been a busy year for Elizabeth Heffron. The Seattle playwright's new one-woman show "Bo-Nita" had its world premier at Seattle Repertory Theatre in late October.

Heffron is working on two other scripts she hopes will get full productions. "Portugal" is about a pair of tank farm workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The second play, "The Weatherman Project" is a collaboration with Kit Bakke, a former member of the Weather Underground.

ACT - A Contemporary Theatre

After 77 plays, Alan Ayckbourn knows his way around a theater. Ayckbourn has won every possible accolade during his long career, but even a 2006 stroke that left him with limited use of an arm and leg hasn't stopped the prolific writer and director.

Instagram Photo/TheEnsemble

Seattle’s Fringe Festival starts this week. It features local companies and artists, but the festival is also drawing performers from around the world. 

The great recession hit small arts groups hard; the festival was on hiatus for several years after its 2003 season and returned just last year.  How did Seattle’s fringe community fare?  Seattle Times theater critic Misha Berson shares some perspective on the health of local companies with Marcie Sillman.

Fighting Foreclosure And Finding Forgiveness

Aug 14, 2013
KUOW Photo/Kendra Hanna

Today on the program, Maddie Ewbank and Srikar Penumaka bring you stories about moving on in life: letting go and gaining in the process.

First, Kendra Hanna tells you about one family's struggle with their home and foreclosure. Ever had buyer's remorse? Well this is a little different. After that, we hear from Ian Dangla about how a high school play helped a family change its perspective on the death penalty.

RadioActive is KUOW's youth radio program, and all the stories here are produced by young people age 16-21. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook.

Flickr Photo/Alan Light

This Week In Olympia
The state legislature begins week four of the special session today. Everett Herald reporter Jerry Cornfield joins us with a  look at what to expect.

An Interview With Actor Kyle MacLachlan
“Who Killed Laura Palmer?” You may remember that phrase from the 1990 TV show "Twin Peaks" – which was set and filmed here in the Northwest. The short-lived series was a cultural phenomenon during its two year run – due in part to eccentric FBI agent Dale Cooper, played memorably by Yakima-native Kyle MacLachlan. In the 1980s, MacLachlan began his career starring in the David Lynch films "Dune" and "Blue Velvet." His other credits include "The Doors," "Showgirls," "Sex and the City" and "Desperate Housewives." More recently, he’s portrayed the mayor of Portland, in the sketch comedy series "Portlandia."

"The Boys In The Boat" Author Daniel James Brown
In 1936, as the US was starting to recover from the Great Depression, a group of University of Washington students won the right to represent the country at the Berlin Olympic Games. The story of how the Husky varsity crew team beat the competition and took home a gold medal has become legend in rowing circles.  Writer Daniel James Brown looks behind the news event to the story of how this group of young men came together as a unified crew.

The Suquamish Tribe Recognized Same-Sex Marriage In 2011: Will Other Tribes?
In March, a Northern Michigan Indian tribe became the third in the US to recognize same-sex marriage. The Suquamish Tribal Council voted to recognize same-sex marriage in 2011. Other tribes have passed laws against. And the US Supreme Court is expected to issue a landmark marriage ruling this summer. Ron Whitener, executive director at Native American Law Center at the University of Washington, explains how the nation’s 563 recognized tribes are approaching the issue.

What’s New In Science News?  
Local virologists are tracking the latest flu in China, and the economics of studying science have led to some new ways to raise money for research. Sally James, Northwest science writer tells us what’s new in science news.

A Conversation With Former Child Star Beverly Washburn
Chances are you’ve seen Beverly Washburn perform, but you didn’t know her name. Have you seen Old Yeller? She was the little girl, Lisbeth. Washburn grew up performing opposite Hollywood greats like Lou Costello and Bing Crosby.   

Weekend Weather Forecast
How will the weather be for Mother's Day this Sunday? Nick Bond joins us with a look at the weekend weather.

Electric Cars, Isabel Allende, And President Obama's Sister

Apr 25, 2013

Electric Car Company Under Congressional Scrutiny
Fisker Automotive is the latest beneficiary of the Obama Administration’s push for renewable energy to flounder. The electric car startup recently fired 75 percent of its workforce and hired bankruptcy advisers. Congress is asking questions about the propriety of federal loans to the politically well-connected company.

A Conversation With Writer Isabel Allende
Isabel Allende is a world-renowned writer, with 19 books in 35 languages. Her latest is "Maya’s Notebook," a tale that revolves around a descent into addiction and a rebirth through the love of family and place.

A Conversation With President Obama’s Sister, Maya Saetoro-Ng
A famous sibling can be a blessing or a burden. Maya Saetoro-Ng is the half-sister of President Obama. She uses her perspective as a history teacher to analyze how her brother’s presidency will be remembered.

Seattle Theater’s Power Couple
Seattle theater audiences know R. Hamilton “Bob” Wright from his long career onstage acting and of late, directing. Wright’s wife, Katie Forgette, is also a fixture on Seattle stages as an actress and now a playwright. Forgette’s newest play has opened at ACT Theatre directed by husband Bob Wright.

Mapping The Human Brain

Feb 28, 2013
Brain scans
Flickr Photo/David Foltz

In his State of the Union address, President Obama proposed a massive scientific endeavor to map the human brain. It's a multi-billion dollar, multi-year project that's meant to do for neuroscience what the Human Genome Project did for DNA. How will scientists actually achieve it? We talk with Dr. Christof Koch from the Allen Institute for Brain Science and Dr. Patricia Kuhl from the UW Institute for Learning and Brain Science.

A Conversation With Comedian David Alan Grier

Jan 18, 2013
Charles Sykes / Invision/AP

The comedy “In Living Color” turned David Alan Grier into a well-known comic actor, but he started his career singing on Broadway. Last year, he returned to Broadway to play Sporting Life in “Porgy and Bess.” David Alan Grier has performed for over 30 years, from stand-up comedy to competing on "Dancing with the Stars." He joins us in the KUOW studios.