texting

In April, residents of Louisa County, Va., were shocked to learn of a sexting "ring" among the town's teenagers. When Hanna Rosin asked teens from Louisa County High School how many people they knew who had sexted, a lot of them replied: "Everyone." But what was originally characterized in the media as an organized criminal affair was soon revealed to be widespread teen behavior.

"I think we as a culture don't know whether to be utterly alarmed by sexting, or think of it as a normal part of teenage sexual experimentation," Rosin tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

Flickr Photo/Skip&Nell (CC BY-NC-ND)

You’ve probably heard the slogan “Click It or Ticket” to promote seatbelt safety. Now, Washington state is joining in a new national campaign to target people who text and drive.

Special patrols will be out statewide, starting Thursday, with a new snappy slogan to add: “U-Drive, U-Text, U-Pay.”

In Washington and Oregon, if you want to talk on your phone while driving, you’re required to use a hands-free device. But now a Washington state lawmaker wants to go further.

Click here for our latest update.

The early reports about what happened Monday afternoon inside a movie theater near Tampa are certainly disturbing:

Flickr Photo/Intel Free Press

Steve Scher talks with Dr. Charlie Klauer, research scientist at Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, about new research on distracted driving.

Call it the year of the "T." Some of the new laws set to take effect in Oregon when the clock strikes midnight on New Year's Eve involve taxes, texting, tethering and teen tanning.

Flickr Photo/OregonDOT

Studies upon studies have exposed the dangers of texting and driving. Some go so far as to say texting is worse than drinking and driving. Renowned director Werner Herzog even made a film about it.

Yet a new University of Washington study shows that one in 12 drivers in Washington state are still using cellphones or other electronic devices on the road, and half of those using their devices are texting.

Ross Reynolds talks with Beth Ebel, the study's principal investigator and trauma doctor in the Injury Prevention and Research Center at Harborview, about her findings.