terrorism

Terrorism
10:16 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Fear Tactics: A History Of Domestic Terrorism

Coming up on Spotlight on Monday, April 29 at 8:00 p.m.

On September 16, 1920, a bomb exploded on Wall Street as workers took their lunch break. The explosion killed 38 people and injured hundreds. The targets? What today we’d call “the one percent” — powerful financiers who ran J.P. Morgan & Co. The Wall Street attack remained the deadliest terrorist bombing in the US until Oklahoma City in 1995. But at the time, people saw it as just one more bombing in a long string of anarchist attacks that historian Beverly Gage calls America's “First Age of Terror.”

Gage and the American History Guys explore the origins of domestic terrorism in the United States and the question of what kinds of people and movements have been identified as “terrorist.” The program traces the relationship between “terror” and the state; considers lynching as a tactic of terrorism; and takes a look at a little known and unfinished Jack London novel, in which the author grapples with the question: When, if ever, is terrorism justified?

Terrorism Or Entrapment?
6:59 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

Seattle Man Gets 18 Years For Terror Plot

Abu Khalid Abdul-Latif (left) and Walli Mujahidh aim machine guns purchased from a police informant in 2011. Mujahidh is scheduled for sentencing on April 8.
U.S. Attorney's Office

A Seattle man received an 18-year prison sentence on terrorism charges on Monday after plotting to attack a military installation in South Seattle.

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More from KUOW
12:00 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

Not So Extraordinary Rendition? Comparing Bush And Obama Policies

Guards from Camp 5 at Joint Task Force Guantanamo escort a detainee from his cell to a recreational facility within the camp, Oct. 2011.
Petty Officer 2nd Class Kilho Park, DVIDSHUB Flickr

When Barack Obama became president he announced a ban on torture and an end to the CIA’s secret prison network.  But how exactly is the Obama administration handling terrorism suspects detained abroad?  And what’s the difference from the Bush administration?

Ross Reynolds talks with American University law professor, Stephen Vladeck, about how the two administrations compare when it comes to the issue of rendition.

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