Updated 11:29 p.m. ET

Paris prosecutor Francois Molins says there have been six attacks in and around the city, and the death toll could exceed 120. The majority of those killed were in a concert hall.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that French police stormed and took control of a concert hall, and two attackers there were killed. Molins says at least five attackers in total have been killed.

Victims lay on the pavement outside a Paris restaurant after an attack on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015.
AP Photo/Thibault Camus

Dozens of people were reported killed Friday night in shootings at several places in Paris, the BBC and The Associated Press reported.

Speaking from the Roosevelt Room of the White House, President Obama said on Thursday that slowing down the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan is "the right thing to do."

"Afghan forces are still not as strong as they need to be," Obama said, so the United States will leave 9,800 troops in the country through most of 2016. By 2017, about 5,500 troops will remain in a few bases across the country.

Obama said that the U.S. mission in Afghanistan will remain focused on two non-combat objectives: to train Afghan forces and carry out counterterrorism operations against al-Qaida.

U.S. Will Keep More Troops In Afghanistan Than Planned

Oct 15, 2015

Senior administration officials say President Obama will announce Thursday that he will keep a larger military presence in Afghanistan than he had planned. The president had hoped to whittle the U.S. forces down to just 1,000 by the time he left office.

The officials say 9,800 troops will stay in Afghanistan through most of 2016, and 5,500 in 2017.

NPR's Mara Liasson reports the decision was driven by recent successes by anti-government Taliban fighters:

Abu Bakker Qassim was a little concerned when Albania granted him and four other Muslim Uighurs political asylum.

It was back in 2006, and they'd all spent four-and-a-half years as detainees in Guantanamo Bay.

"What I knew about Albania, it was a communist state," Qassim says. "I was saying to myself, 'Albania, that's a communist state, we already left a communist state.'"

Qassim says he fled China in 2001 to escape persecution of Uighurs, a Turkic-speaking Muslim minoirity group.

On Sept. 11, 2001, Isaac Feliciano dropped his wife off at the subway so she could get to her job at Marsh & McLennan, in the south tower of the World Trade Center. Then, he headed to work himself — at the Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, where he's worked for the past 21 years.

When the plane struck the tower, even as far away as he was, Feliciano was still able to see the damage firsthand.

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET

More details are emerging about the incident in which three Americans, including two U.S. servicemen traveling in civilian clothes, overpowered, tackled and subdued a Kalashnikov-wielding gunman aboard a high-speed train in Belgium.

One of those who helped take down the assailant was slashed multiple times with a box cutter in the scuffle and remains hospitalized with non-life threatening wounds, according to The Associated Press.

A jury in Boston has found 21-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev guilty on all counts related to the 2013 bombings of the Boston Marathon. The twin bombings, carried out with his older brother, Tamerlan, killed three people and left 264 others wounded.

In this courtroom sketch, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, center, is depicted between defense attorneys Miriam Conrad, left, and Judy Clarke, right, during his federal death penalty trial, Thursday, March 5, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with hi
AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins

BOSTON (AP) -- Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was convicted Wednesday in the Boston Marathon bombing by a federal jury that now must decide whether the 21-year-old former college student should be executed.

Tsarnaev kept his hands folded in front of him and looked down at the defense table as listened to the verdict, reached after a day and a half of deliberations. He was found guilty on charges that included conspiracy and use of a weapon of mass destruction - offenses punishable by death.

One day after four gunmen killed at least 147 people in an attack on a university campus in Kenya, police are hunting terrorism suspects, and students are debating whether to return to Garissa University College. A teachers union says the school should shut down.

Ross Reynolds talks to Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., about his efforts to find a solution for Somali-Americans who can no longer send money back to Somalia after Merchant Bank in California stopped transferring money.

Nearly 4,000 blacks were lynched in the American South between the end of the Civil War and World War II, according to a new report by the Equal Justice Initiative.

The report, Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror, says that the number of victims in the 12 Southern states was more than 20 percent higher than previously reported.

Lynchings were part of a system of racial terror designed to subjugate a people, says the Alabama-based nonprofit's executive director, Bryan Stevenson.

The Seattle Times Photo/Erika Schultz

Somalis living in the U.S. send more than $200 million to Somalia each year. Sixty percent of that country’s population gets money from outside the country to help pay for expenses like food and housing. But as of Friday, money transfers from Washington state to Somalia are shutting down.

World leaders are condemning the brutal burning death of a Jordanian pilot by ISIS militants.

News of such acts have particular resonance for Theo Padnos. The American journalist went to Yemen in 2004 to study Arabic and ended up studying Islam as well as the young men seduced by a violent interpretation of it.

Marcie Sillman talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist at the Vancouver Sun, about Canada's response to the terror attacks in Paris and the recent arrest in Canada of a man with suspected connections to the Islamic State.