terrorism

Gunman Opens Fire In Canadian Parliament

Oct 22, 2014

Marcie Sillman talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about today's shooting at the Canadian Parliament in Ottawa, which some have linked to the terrorist group Islamic State, also known as ISIS.

Flickr Photo/The White House (Pete Souza) (CC)

Marcie Sillman speaks with U.S. Representatives Jim McDermott and Denny Heck about their response to President Obama's strategy in Iraq and Syria against the terrorist group ISIS.

AP Photo/Jim Mone

A Somali immigrant living in Kent was arrested Wednesday on charges of fundraising for the Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab. Her arrest could cast more suspicion on the system Somalis use to send money home.

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria is flush with cash, and holds as much as $2 billion. Counterterrorism officials say the group knows how to use that money to its advantage. It's showing a kind of professional acumen and discipline that sets it apart from other terrorist organizations. But what kinds of attacks can its money buy?

Back in 2006, when Germany was hosting the World Cup soccer tournament, a terrorist attack was narrowly averted. With bombs hidden in their suitcases, two men in their 20s boarded commuter trains in the city of Cologne.

Kenya saw another deadly attack when armed militants stormed a small coastal town Sunday night, leaving at least 48 people dead.

Kenya's Standard Digital reports that police warned the death toll could climb higher. The Standard adds:

President Obama has informed Congress that 275 U.S. Armed Forces personnel will go to Iraq to provide security for the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, as a militant Sunni group continues its offensive in the country, seizing control of the northern town of Tal Afar.

AP Photo/STR

Marcie Sillman talks to Dan Murphy, national security correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor, about the worsening situation in Iraq. Then, David Hyde talks to Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., a ranking member on the House Armed Service Committee, about the U.S. response to the violence.

The militant group Islamic State In Iraq and Al-Sham has been seizing cities in northern Iraq. Mosul, one of the largest city in northern Iraq, was seized Tuesday. Members of Congress are weighing in on the situation. Some Republicans have called for immediate military intervention there, but Smith thinks a military solution might not be the answer right now.

The U.S. has devoted billions of dollars to fighting terrorism overseas in the years since the Sept. 11 attacks.

The Justice Department is increasingly warning about the danger posed by radicals on American soil, and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder wants prosecutors and FBI agents to devote more attention to the threat.

Nearly two decades ago, after the Oklahoma City bombing killed 168 people, the Justice Department launched a group to fight domestic terrorism.

A coordinated attack on an outdoor market in northwest China has left 31 people dead and dozens wounded, prompting promises of a vigorous government response. Bombs and cars were used to inflict damage on people at the market.

The Chinese government called the early morning attack in Urumqi, the capital of the Xinjiang region, a "serious violent terrorist incident of a particularly vile nature," according to The Associated Press. Previous violent attacks have been blamed on the area's Muslim Uighur minority.

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

Marcie Sillman talks to Richard Downie, deputy director and fellow of the Africa Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. It has been almost a month since nearly 300 school-aged girls were kidnapped in Nigeria by the group Boko Haram. Downie explains who the Boko Haram are and what motivates their egregious tactics.

This post has been updated.

There's no sign yet of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 — the Boeing 777 with 239 people aboard that disappeared early Saturday while on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

At the same time, there is confusion as to where authorities last spotted the jet.

Suspicion is immediately focusing on the Islamist group Boko Haram as word emerges about another horrific attack on school children in Nigeria.

Vimeo/Courtesy William Anthony Photography/wmanthony.com

Bill Iffrig was 15 feet from finishing the Boston Marathon in April when the first bomb went off.

Update at 12:55 p.m. ET:

Telling his nation that security forces have "ashamed" those who attacked a shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta on Tuesday declared "we have defeated the monster of terrorism."

As night fell in Kenya and after four days that captured attention around the world, it appeared the crisis was over.

Kenyatta said, as the BBC reports, that the death toll from Saturday's attack by Somalia-based terrorists and the siege that followed was:

-- 61 civilians.

-- 6 security officers.

AP Photo/Jonathan Kalan

The deadly terrorist attack in a Kenyan shopping mall has so far left over 60 dead and many wounded. The Somali-based terrorist organization Al-Shabab claimed responsibility. While the attack came as a shock to many of us, law professor Makau Mutua says Kenya has known for a long time that an attack was coming.

Makau Mutua is the dean of University of Buffalo's Law School and member of the independent, nonpartisan Council on Foreign Relations. Ross Reynolds talks with Makau about the context behind this act of terrorism.

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