terrorism

Ross Reynolds talks to Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., about his efforts to find a solution for Somali-Americans who can no longer send money back to Somalia after Merchant Bank in California stopped transferring money.

Nearly 4,000 blacks were lynched in the American South between the end of the Civil War and World War II, according to a new report by the Equal Justice Initiative.

The report, Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror, says that the number of victims in the 12 Southern states was more than 20 percent higher than previously reported.

Lynchings were part of a system of racial terror designed to subjugate a people, says the Alabama-based nonprofit's executive director, Bryan Stevenson.

The Seattle Times Photo/Erika Schultz

Somalis living in the U.S. send more than $200 million to Somalia each year. Sixty percent of that country’s population gets money from outside the country to help pay for expenses like food and housing. But as of Friday, money transfers from Washington state to Somalia are shutting down.

World leaders are condemning the brutal burning death of a Jordanian pilot by ISIS militants.

News of such acts have particular resonance for Theo Padnos. The American journalist went to Yemen in 2004 to study Arabic and ended up studying Islam as well as the young men seduced by a violent interpretation of it.

Marcie Sillman talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist at the Vancouver Sun, about Canada's response to the terror attacks in Paris and the recent arrest in Canada of a man with suspected connections to the Islamic State.

Jews Face New Fears In Europe

Jan 13, 2015

The killing of four French Jews in last week’s hostage standoff at a Paris kosher market has deepened the fears among European Jewish communities shaken by rising anti-Semitism and feeling vulnerable due to poor security and a large number of undefended potential targets.

The hostage situation followed the attack on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo that left 12 people dead. Experts say European Jews have not felt this threatened since World War II, when some 6 million Jews were murdered in the Nazi Holocaust.

A small gathering at Red Square to discuss the events that have unfolded in Paris.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Several dozen students and Francophiles gathered in Red Square on the University of Washington campus on Friday in light of the tragic events that unfolded this week in Paris.

They formed a loose circle and discussed freedom of expression, what they love about France and how they were handling the news that two gunman had entered the offices of Charlie Hebdo magazine and killed 12 staffers. The gunmen died Friday after a standoff with police. 

Zachary Gian, an exchange student from France, said it has been hard to watch the news.

(This post was last updated at 6:50 p.m. ET.)

A nationwide manhunt for the suspects of France's deadliest terrorist attack in more than 50 years ended in a hail of gunfire on Friday.

After hours of tension in two separate standoffs that shut down parts of the Paris metro area, the two main suspects in the attack on a satirical magazine and a man who took hostages at a kosher grocery are dead, President François Hollande said in a speech to the nation.

The attack on the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo has prompted a multitude of questions. Here’s a brief guide by the staff of PRI’s The World. (We’ll be updating throughout the day.)

Question: What's the latest?

Louafi Larbi/Reuters

Six months before he was beheaded by ISIS, American hostage James Foley was offered up as a bargaining chip.

That's according to the New York Times, which reported on Sunday that a disillusioned ISIS commander wanted asylum in the US — and $750,000 to start a new life. But the US government reportedly refused to discuss the possibility.

Last week, the Taliban attacked the Army Public School in Peshawar, Pakistan, killing more than 140 people, most of them schoolchildren.

Gunman Opens Fire In Canadian Parliament

Oct 22, 2014

Marcie Sillman talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about today's shooting at the Canadian Parliament in Ottawa, which some have linked to the terrorist group Islamic State, also known as ISIS.

Flickr Photo/The White House (Pete Souza) (CC)

Marcie Sillman speaks with U.S. Representatives Jim McDermott and Denny Heck about their response to President Obama's strategy in Iraq and Syria against the terrorist group ISIS.

AP Photo/Jim Mone

A Somali immigrant living in Kent was arrested Wednesday on charges of fundraising for the Somali insurgent group Al-Shabaab. Her arrest could cast more suspicion on the system Somalis use to send money home.

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria is flush with cash, and holds as much as $2 billion. Counterterrorism officials say the group knows how to use that money to its advantage. It's showing a kind of professional acumen and discipline that sets it apart from other terrorist organizations. But what kinds of attacks can its money buy?

Back in 2006, when Germany was hosting the World Cup soccer tournament, a terrorist attack was narrowly averted. With bombs hidden in their suitcases, two men in their 20s boarded commuter trains in the city of Cologne.

Pages