terrorism

R
Feisal Omar/Reuters

It's not uncommon for images of carnage to dominate international news coverage of Mogadishu, Somalia. But Hana Abukar wants to show that it is so much more.

R
Reuters

ISIS is out with a new edition of its propaganda magazine, Dabiq. Their lead story is the attack in San Bernardino, on December 2. In the magazine, ISIS is claiming responsibility for the bloodshed and encouraging its supporters to copy  it. 

The story highlights the role of the female attacker, Tashfeen Malik, the wife of Syed Rizwan Farook. Both were shot dead in a gunbattle with police, but only after they had killed 14 people.

A debate is raging in France over whether Jewish men should avoid wearing the traditional yarmulke, so as not to identify themselves at a time of increasing violence by young radical Islamists. The proposal was put forth this week by a Jewish leader in Marseille, following a knife attack on a local Jewish teacher.

Zvi Ammar, head of Marseille's 60,000-strong Jewish community, suggested it might be better if Jews in Marseille stopped wearing the yarmulke, also known as a kippah.

"For the time being," Ammar said, "at least until these barbarians calm down."

C
Courtesy The New Yorker

Francoise Mouly's entire life has been about images and how people respond to them and on this one-year anniversary of the murders at the office of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, The New Yorker art editor is still incredulous that it happened.

"I'm trying to recapture the visceral reactions that I think I felt and everybody felt at the idea of cartoonists being murdered for having a drawn a picture."

The FBI said it is officially investigating Wednesday's mass shooting that killed at least 14 people in San Bernardino, Calif., as a terrorist act.

"We are now investigating these horrific acts as an act of terrorism," David Bowdich, assistant director of the FBI's Los Angeles office, announced during a news conference Friday. He said the shooters had attempted to erase their digital footprints and that agents had recovered two deliberately destroyed cellphones.

In the wake of a mass shooting that left 14 people dead in San Bernardino, Calif., a familiar question has cropped up: "Is this an act of terrorism?" NPR's Carrie Johnson reports that law enforcement authorities are still trying to decipher a motive in the case, which ultimately could determine what label is placed on the shooting.

After a mass shooting, a police chase and a shootout, a violent day in San Bernardino, Calif., ended in the death of two suspects, authorities say.

Syed Farook, 28, and Tashfeen Malik, 27, were responsible for the Wednesday morning attack that killed at least 14 people and injured 21, according to San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan. After initial concerns that there could have been a third shooter, police are now confident there were only two.

They connect via online services — especially Twitter — and in everyday life. Their ages range from 15 to 47, and their roles range from cheering attacks to plotting violence. And curbing their growth is a dynamic challenge without a simple solution: There are currently 900 active investigations into ISIS sympathizers in every American state.

Those are some of the findings of a new study that glimpses life "inside the bubble of American ISIS sympathizers, a diverse and diffuse scene that the FBI estimates include hundreds, if not thousands, of individuals."

President Obama and French President François Hollande promised to increase cooperation and expand attacks against the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.

During a joint press conference with Hollande at the White House, Obama said that the United States and France "owe our freedom to each other."

After the Paris attacks, Obama said, "our hearts broke too."

"In that stadium, concert hall, restaurants and cafes we see our own," Obama said. "Today we stand with you."

ISIS brings in millions and the US is all but helpless to stop it.

Nov 24, 2015
Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

In the wake of the attacks in Paris, more and more people are saying that when it comes to ISIS, it's time to follow the money.

But where does ISIS — often described as the richest terrorist organization — get their cash from?

According to Cam Simpson, a reporter for Bloomburg Business, the answer to that question is oil.

At every turn, this year's presidential campaign has proved conventional wisdom wrong. The aftermath of the Paris attacks might be another example.

As soon as the attacks were over, a chorus of (establishment) Republican voices predicted that the new focus on national security and terrorism would change the dynamic of the Republican race. This was the tipping point, they declared, that would finally usher out the outsiders leading the polls — Donald Trump and Ben Carson — in favor of more serious, experienced candidates.

The Islamic State's activities in Iraq and Syria are well-known, but the group is gaining a toehold elsewhere in the world as well. In a chilling new documentary, a long-haired fighter claims that an ISIS-run "school" teaches all local children from the age of 3 in Afghanistan's Kunar province.

King County Sheriff John Urquhart
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Bill Radke talks with King County Sheriff John Urquhart about why he's asking his off-duty deputies to carry firearms and extra ammunition following the terrorist attacks in Paris.

The Islamic State's claim of responsibility for a trio of major attacks, including the assault on Paris, has led to a rapid reassessment of the extremist group and its aspirations.

Until a couple of weeks ago, ISIS appeared focused on building its self-declared caliphate, or Islamic empire, in its core areas of Syria and Iraq. But it now says it was behind attacks in France, Egypt and Lebanon that killed nearly 400 people in a two-week span.

Basic questions — like the group's goals or whether it's getting stronger or weaker — are being examined anew.

Most deaths ever recorded, biggest increase ever observed, more countries affected than ever before: A new report on global terrorism in 2014 found a number of grim benchmarks were met last year.

The report finds that deaths from terrorist attacks increased by 80 percent, compared to 2013, and that Boko Haram was the deadliest terrorist group in the world last year.

More than 32,000 people were killed by terrorism in 2014, according to The Global Terrorism Index — compared to 18,111 the year before.

Pages