President Obama and French President François Hollande promised to increase cooperation and expand attacks against the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.

During a joint press conference with Hollande at the White House, Obama said that the United States and France "owe our freedom to each other."

After the Paris attacks, Obama said, "our hearts broke too."

"In that stadium, concert hall, restaurants and cafes we see our own," Obama said. "Today we stand with you."

ISIS brings in millions and the US is all but helpless to stop it.

Nov 24, 2015
Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

In the wake of the attacks in Paris, more and more people are saying that when it comes to ISIS, it's time to follow the money.

But where does ISIS — often described as the richest terrorist organization — get their cash from?

According to Cam Simpson, a reporter for Bloomburg Business, the answer to that question is oil.

At every turn, this year's presidential campaign has proved conventional wisdom wrong. The aftermath of the Paris attacks might be another example.

As soon as the attacks were over, a chorus of (establishment) Republican voices predicted that the new focus on national security and terrorism would change the dynamic of the Republican race. This was the tipping point, they declared, that would finally usher out the outsiders leading the polls — Donald Trump and Ben Carson — in favor of more serious, experienced candidates.

The Islamic State's activities in Iraq and Syria are well-known, but the group is gaining a toehold elsewhere in the world as well. In a chilling new documentary, a long-haired fighter claims that an ISIS-run "school" teaches all local children from the age of 3 in Afghanistan's Kunar province.

King County Sheriff John Urquhart
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Bill Radke talks with King County Sheriff John Urquhart about why he's asking his off-duty deputies to carry firearms and extra ammunition following the terrorist attacks in Paris.

The Islamic State's claim of responsibility for a trio of major attacks, including the assault on Paris, has led to a rapid reassessment of the extremist group and its aspirations.

Until a couple of weeks ago, ISIS appeared focused on building its self-declared caliphate, or Islamic empire, in its core areas of Syria and Iraq. But it now says it was behind attacks in France, Egypt and Lebanon that killed nearly 400 people in a two-week span.

Basic questions — like the group's goals or whether it's getting stronger or weaker — are being examined anew.

Most deaths ever recorded, biggest increase ever observed, more countries affected than ever before: A new report on global terrorism in 2014 found a number of grim benchmarks were met last year.

The report finds that deaths from terrorist attacks increased by 80 percent, compared to 2013, and that Boko Haram was the deadliest terrorist group in the world last year.

More than 32,000 people were killed by terrorism in 2014, according to The Global Terrorism Index — compared to 18,111 the year before.

Jay Inslee says he won't join the growing list of governors who say they don't want Syrian refugees within their state borders.

In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, the governor of Washington state publicly welcomed refugees, citing the inscription on the Statue of Liberty, warning fellow governors against "fear," and insisting that background checks minimize whatever risk the refugees may pose.

The French flag flies over the Space needle on Saturday Nov. 14. It was one of several displays of solidarity with France in Seattle after the terrorist attacks on Nov. 13.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Does the Space Needle flying the French flag in solidarity with victims of the Paris terror attacks represent a racist monopoly on grief? Bill Radke talks with The Stranger's Charles Mudede.

The Paris attacks have brought new attention to Dimitri Bontinck, a member of Belgium's Dutch-speaking majority. His life was dramatically changed a few years ago, when his then-teenage son converted to Islam and went to Syria to join Islamist fighters there.

Now Bontick is trying to prevent other young Europeans from following the same path.

A handful of fairly-famous Eastern Washington winemakers and cult foodies have strong roots in France. One of them, Walla Walla winemaker Gilles Nicault, has felt really far away from his family in the wake of the ISIS attack on Paris.

Two major terrorist attacks happened last week. One killed at least 129 people in Paris, France. Another killed at least 43 people in Beirut, Lebanon.

ISIS claimed responsibility for both attacks, but the global support and attention given to each incident varied widely.

To quantify the difference in online attention since the attack in Beirut happened, PRI has done some simple estimations using several free online tools. The evidence unfortunately has confirmed the observation above.

At a news conference in Turkey on Monday, President Obama defended his administration's strategy against ISIS, calling Friday's deadly terrorist attacks in Paris "outrageous." He said, however, the U.S. would not send additional ground troops into Syria to combat the Islamic State.

A Southern California college student studying abroad in Paris was one of the 129 killed Friday.

Nohemi Gonzalez was 23 years old.

Her family called her Mimi. She was left-handed and had a tattoo of Pocahontas on her left arm. At the vigil held for her at Cal State Long Beach on Sunday night, her classmates, family and faculty wore feathers in her honor as the choir sang.

It was a somber affair, but everyone who got up to speak talked about how Gonzalez was anything but.

People gather Saturday at La Parisienne bakery in Seattle's Belltown to show support after the terrorist attacks in Paris.
KUOW photo/Kate Walters

The French anthem and cries of "Vive la France" swelled in Seattle's Belltown after a minute of silence Saturday for those killed and injured in the Paris attacks.