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Ted Cruz

After a bitter primary battle that culminated with Ted Cruz being booed off the stage at the Republican National Convention, the Texas senator says he will vote for Donald Trump.

In a 741-word Facebook post Friday, Cruz wrote that he made the decision because he wants to "keep his word" to vote for the Republican nominee and because he finds Hillary Clinton "wholly unacceptable."

Washington state's Cruz supporters pose at the Republican National Convention. Reporter David Hyde said some have not transferred their allegiance to Donald Trump.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Deborah Wang speaks with David Hyde at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland about the Ted Cruz speech that made waves last night because it failed to endorse nominee Donald Trump.

Hyde tells us how the Washington state delegation reacted to Cruz's call for people to vote their conscience.

Less than 12 hours after he was booed for not endorsing GOP nominee Donald Trump during his late-night speech before the Republican National Convention, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz wasn't backing down.

At an emotional event with the Texas RNC delegation Thursday morning, Cruz defended his decision to withhold his endorsement at a time when Republicans are trying to rally around their nominee ahead of the general election.

Kerry French at American Lake in Lakewood. She's campaigning for Sen. Ted Cruz in Pierce County.
KUOW PHOTO/Amy Radil

Overnight, Washington Republicans have had to change gears.

Tuesday they were preparing to welcome candidates Ted Cruz and John Kasich at presidential campaign rallies and events in the state. 

Now with those candidates out of the race, they’re deciding whether they want to support Donald Trump, the party's apparent nominee, or anyone at all.

In this March 10, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich, right, speaks as Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, listens, during a Republican presidential debate.
AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File

Bill Radke speaks with Saul Gamoran, chair of Senator Ted Cruz's Washington state campaign, and former Attorney General Rob McKenna, Washington state co-chair for Governor John Kasich, about whether they'll unite behind Donald Trump's candidacy.

Ted Cruz raised the most money of any Republican presiddential candidate in Washington state.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Candidates who raise the most money tend to win elections.

But not always.

Republican Senator Ted Cruz was scheduled to speak at a rally in Spokane and a fundraiser in Redmond on Wednesday and at a rally in Bothell on Thursday.

But he dropped out of the presidential race Tuesday night after Donald Trump's big win in Indiana.

Former House Speaker John Boehner is a retired politician, so he seems to have retired from being politic. He went with radical honesty at a recent event at Stanford, according to the Stanford Daily, when he was asked about his opinion of Republican presidential candidate and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

"Lucifer in the flesh," the former speaker said. "I have Democrat friends and Republican friends. I get along with almost everyone, but I have never worked with a more miserable son of a bitch in my life."

Barbara Hagstrom of Duvall shows off her Trump t-shirt at the 5th Legislative District GOP Caucus.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The Republican presidential contest is going to be heating up very quickly in Washington state.

All three GOP candidates have announced that they are coming here to campaign before the state's primary.

In this March 10, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich, right, speaks as Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, listens, during a Republican presidential debate.
AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File

Governor John Kasich and Senator Ted Cruz have joined forces to try and stop Donald Trump, sort of. 

They've struck a deal to not compete in three states: Kasich will not campaign in Indiana and Cruz will not campaign in New Mexico or Oregon. But the truce ends at the Washington state line.

Oregon's Republican presidential primary is taking on a new look. The Ted Cruz campaign said the Texas senator will stand down in Oregon to clear a path for Ohio Governor John Kasich. The Cruz campaign will also pull back its efforts in New Mexico.

In return, the Kasich camp will back off in Indiana.

Kerry French at American Lake in Lakewood. She's campaigning for Sen. Ted Cruz in Pierce County.
KUOW PHOTO/Amy Radil

Kerry French, a Republican leader in Pierce County, campaigns for Ted Cruz, the presidential candidate, with a smart phone app.

Users earn “points” as they give information and get the word out. First comes a brief survey, which French demonstrated at a park in Lakewood, near her desk job at Camp Murray. 

“Would you describe yourself as evangelical? Yes. If I had to choose I’d probably say Tea Party-ish. Although Tea Party values are in our platform. So, Libertarian? Maybe a little.”

Barbara Hagstrom of Duvall shows off her Trump t-shirt at the 5th Legislative District GOP Caucus.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

It’s not at all clear who will win the Republican primary in Washington state next month —Donald Trump, Ted Cruz or John Kasich.

There's a lot on the line for both parties in Tuesday's Wisconsin contest. For Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, the state is a prime chance to stop Donald Trump and complicate the GOP front-runner's path to the nomination. For Bernie Sanders, a win over Hillary Clinton helps close his delegate deficit and gives the Vermont senator new momentum heading into the next stretch of the primary calendar.

Ted Cruz raised the most money of any Republican presiddential candidate in Washington state.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Along with the horror and sadness evoked by the bombings in Brussels on Tuesday, Seattle's Muslim community is also grappling with feelings of fear and anxiety. 

Once again, they're worried about the possible backlash which can occur after events like this. 

Sen. Ted Cruz won the Idaho Republican presidential primary. Cruz pulled in about 45 percent of the GOP vote Tuesday followed by businessman Donald Trump in a distant second place with 28 percent.

Idaho State Treasurer Ron Crane served as Ted Cruz’s honorary state chairman. Crane said Cruz’s values aligned with Idaho’s GOP electorate.

“He connected with Idahoans,” Crane said. “I think his visit to Idaho this last weekend was strategic. His timing was perfect.”

"I will not compromise away your religious liberty."

That was the vow Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz made to supporters in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho as he campaigned Saturday at the Kootenai County Fairgrounds.

Iowa voters took the first step in choosing a new president of the United States Monday night. Republicans in the state chose Texas Sen. Ted Cruz over Donald Trump.

Hillary Clinton won the Iowa Democratic caucuses, according to data from the Iowa Democratic Party. The Associated Press called the race for Clinton shortly after 1 p.m. ET Tuesday. Based on the results of Monday's caucuses, the state party said Clinton received 699.57 state delegate equivalents; Sanders, 695.49.

Terrorism and economic woes may be big concerns, but Republican candidate Ted Cruz sees another issue dominating the presidential race.

"I'm convinced 2016 will be a religious liberty election," he said in a recent interview.

Cruz says religious people, devout Christians in particular, are routinely marginalized and harassed for their beliefs, and that such treatment has gotten worse under the Obama administration.

The first presidential candidates have declared, and that means Rand Paul, Hillary Clinton, Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio all have shiny new logos to go with their new campaigns.

This early in the campaign, with little actual substance to pick apart so far, the logos are prime bait on the Internet, attracting supporters, haters, wanna-be graphic designers and more.

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz announced his bid for president early Monday. The Republican has been making the rounds with other 2016 hopefuls, so it's hardly a surprise, but he's the first major one to make it official. And if the early campaign trail is any indication of how the race will play out, Cruz, 44, will be exactly who he's always been. He's relatively new to public office, having been elected to the Senate in 2012. But he has made his career — and attracted support from the right's base along the way — as a staunch defender of conservative values.

Here's what you need to know: